36 Chapters
Medium 9781780644608

21: Two Canadian Mountaineering Camps: Participant Motivations and Sense of Place in a Wilderness Setting

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

21 

Two Canadian Mountaineering

Camps: Participant Motivations and Sense of Place in a Wilderness Setting

Robin Reid* and Terry Palechuk

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Introduction

Since the early 1900s, the presence of the

Alpine Club of Canada’s (ACC) General

­

Mountaineering Camp (GMC) on the Canadian landscape has been significant to the mountaineering, exploration and holiday activities in remote locations in the Rocky

Mountain ranges of Western Canada. More recently the Boutique Mountaineering Camp

(BMC) has also started offering unique opportunities for participants to engage in mountaineering and hiking activities in a

Canadian wilderness setting. When one considers holiday experiences and the notion of

‘place’ in a wilderness setting, a question comes to mind: of all the available vacation options, why choose a mountaineering camp? What makes these particular wilderness place-­ experiences stand out from the multitude of other offerings on the ‘brochure rack’ of possible holidays?

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28: Rural Tourism and Small Business Networks in Mountain Areas: Integrating Information Communication Technologies (ICT) and Community in Western Southland, New Zealand

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

28 

Rural Tourism and Small Business

Networks in Mountain Areas: Integrating

Information Communication Technologies

(ICT) and Community in Western

Southland, New Zealand

Carolyn Deuchar* and Simon Milne

AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand

Introduction

Tourism offerings in mountain destinations are often diverse, fragmented and uncoordinated in terms of management, due to the wide variety of stakeholders involved (Strobl and Peters,

2013). This is compounded for small tourism enterprise (STE) owners/operators in rural areas where geographical isolation, distance from markets, and often limited transport and infrastructure impact on their ability to be competitive at a national and global level.

Western Southland is a rural destination located at the very south of New Zealand’s South

Island (see Fig. 28.1). Tucked between the towering peaks of Fiordland to the west, the Takitimu mountain range to the north, and the wild Southern Ocean, Western Southland boasts spectacular unspoilt scenery and coastline, lush rolling farmland, and is an area that is rich in Maori culture and early settler history. It is a lesser-known rural destination that, in terms of touristic activity, is considered ‘well off the beaten track’.

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34: Non-government Organizations’ Mountain Management: A Sustainable Support Model for Southern Oregon’s Mountain Destinations

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

34 

Non-government Organizations’

Mountain Management: A Sustainable

Support Model for Southern Oregon’s

Mountain Destinations

1

Byron Marlowe1* and Alison Burke2

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; 2Southern Oregon

University, Ashland, Oregon, USA

Introduction

Mountains are increasingly dependent upon the support of non-governmental organizations

(NGOs). These usually involve grassroots efforts, mobilized by ordinary citizens. NGOs and communities are representative of a broad spectrum within a targeted region and are indicative of the heterogeneity of their various community groups (Maxwell, 2005). Their nonprofit status allows them the freedom to tackle different objectives specific to the region, such as climate considerations, sustainability and community support. In southern Oregon, NGO employees and volunteer workers are increasingly valuable in the sustainable future of the region’s mountain recreation and tourism.

Non-governmental organizations in the

Southern Oregon region within the USA are responsible for several management strategies including land stewardship, fundraising, hotel operations, food service, travel marketing and education. Each NGO is comprised of local individuals and private citizen donations, there is a unique devotion and commitment to longterm goals, protecting the ecology of the region,

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7: Significant Innovation in the Development and Provision of Heli-ski Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

7 

Significant Innovation in the

Development and Provision of Heli-ski

Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike

Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Harold Richins*

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Innovation in Special Niche Tourism

Experience Development

Tourism, and particularly special niche tourism, has advanced through a multitude of innovative practices over the last 50 years (Poon, 1993;

Rachman and Richins, 1997; Benckendorff et al., 2014; Neuhofer et al., 2014). These innovative practices are found in both major and minor tourism product/service experience

­provision developments; through innovation in channel/promotion methods; and in the methods for accessing these experiences (Novelli, 2005;

Swarbrooke and Horner, 2005; Scarinci and

Richins, 2008).

Innovation has been defined and conceptualized in diverse ways (Peters and Pikkematt,

2005). The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development defined enterprise innovation as: ‘The implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), or process, a new marketing method, or a new organizational method in business practices, workplace organization or external relations’

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23: Regional Collaboration in Community-based Mountain Tourism in World Heritage Sites: The Ifugao Rice Terraces of the Cordillera Central Mountains in the Philippines

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

23 

Regional Collaboration in Community-based Mountain Tourism in World Heritage Sites: The Ifugao Rice

Terraces of the Cordillera Central

Mountains in the Philippines

1

Jovel Ananayo1* and Harold Richins2

Ifugao State University, Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines;

2

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Introduction

This chapter examines the role of tourism development on the conservation of world heritage sites, focusing on the Ifugao Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras. These terraces, bounded by rugged peaks, are located within the Cordillera Central Mountains on the northern part of the island of Luzon, in the northernmost region of the Philippines archipelago

(see Fig. 23.1). The interrelationship between tourism development and world heritage site conservation are explored by analysing the tourism programme of the Save the Ifugao Terraces

Movement (SITMo), which was intended to help conserve the Ifugao world heritage sites.

This case study includes a description of a locally developed method in addressing long-term conservation and community development issues within a world heritage cultural site. The case acknowledges, in the context of its broader plan, the background and approach in developing locally based tourism within the region

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