36 Chapters
Medium 9781780644608

7: Significant Innovation in the Development and Provision of Heli-ski Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

7 

Significant Innovation in the

Development and Provision of Heli-ski

Mountain Experiences: The Case of Mike

Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Harold Richins*

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Innovation in Special Niche Tourism

Experience Development

Tourism, and particularly special niche tourism, has advanced through a multitude of innovative practices over the last 50 years (Poon, 1993;

Rachman and Richins, 1997; Benckendorff et al., 2014; Neuhofer et al., 2014). These innovative practices are found in both major and minor tourism product/service experience

­provision developments; through innovation in channel/promotion methods; and in the methods for accessing these experiences (Novelli, 2005;

Swarbrooke and Horner, 2005; Scarinci and

Richins, 2008).

Innovation has been defined and conceptualized in diverse ways (Peters and Pikkematt,

2005). The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development defined enterprise innovation as: ‘The implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), or process, a new marketing method, or a new organizational method in business practices, workplace organization or external relations’

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1: Overview of Mountain Tourism: Substantive Nature, Historical Context, Areas of Focus

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

1 

Overview of Mountain Tourism:

Substantive Nature, Historical Context,

Areas of Focus

Harold Richins,1* Sydney Johnsen2 and Dr John S. Hull1

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada;

2

Peak Planning Associates, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

1

The Aim of This Book on Mountain

Tourism

The aim of this book is to advance the literature in the field of mountain tourism. In particular, this book aims to broaden the discussion on the diversity of perspectives, interactions and roles of mountain tourism, through an interdisciplinary and management context that addresses communities, impacts, development approaches, planning and governance, natural environment, and creation of mountain tourism experiences.

Mountain Tourism: Experiences, Communities, Environments and Sustainable

Futures contains five thematic areas, each with an overview and relevant case studies. These themes include: (i) the creation of mountain tourism experiences; (ii) people and communities in mountain tourism; (iii) natural environments in mountain tourism; (iv) impacts and solutions in mountain tourism; and (v) development, planning and governance approaches in mountain tourism. Mountain areas from around the world are covered in this edited book including areas within Europe, Asia-Pacific, North

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34: Non-government Organizations’ Mountain Management: A Sustainable Support Model for Southern Oregon’s Mountain Destinations

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

34 

Non-government Organizations’

Mountain Management: A Sustainable

Support Model for Southern Oregon’s

Mountain Destinations

1

Byron Marlowe1* and Alison Burke2

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; 2Southern Oregon

University, Ashland, Oregon, USA

Introduction

Mountains are increasingly dependent upon the support of non-governmental organizations

(NGOs). These usually involve grassroots efforts, mobilized by ordinary citizens. NGOs and communities are representative of a broad spectrum within a targeted region and are indicative of the heterogeneity of their various community groups (Maxwell, 2005). Their nonprofit status allows them the freedom to tackle different objectives specific to the region, such as climate considerations, sustainability and community support. In southern Oregon, NGO employees and volunteer workers are increasingly valuable in the sustainable future of the region’s mountain recreation and tourism.

Non-governmental organizations in the

Southern Oregon region within the USA are responsible for several management strategies including land stewardship, fundraising, hotel operations, food service, travel marketing and education. Each NGO is comprised of local individuals and private citizen donations, there is a unique devotion and commitment to longterm goals, protecting the ecology of the region,

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22: Impacts and Solutions in Mountain Tourism: Overview, Contextual Development and Areas of Focus

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

22 

Impacts and Solutions in Mountain Tourism: Overview, Contextual

Development and Areas of Focus

John S. Hull* and Harold Richins

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Introduction

Chapter 22 provides an introduction to Part V, which explores the diversity of impacts, approaches and solutions in mountain tourism, through utilization of a number of case studies and relevant writings. By gaining a greater understanding of the complex effects and approaches used to achieve viable outcomes and successful results, this may also provide substantially greater possibility in minimizing adverse consequences in mountain tourism.

Introduction to literature on Impacts and Solutions in Mountain Tourism

Regional development and mountain tourism

Policy makers argue that tourism is an important tool for regional development that has the potential to improve quality of life in mountain destinations by providing employment opportunities for local residents, important tax revenues for governments, and economic diversification for local economies (Godde et al., 2000;

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26: Mountain Tourism in Germany: Challenges and Opportunities in Addressing Seasonality at Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Richins, H.; Hull, J.S. CABI PDF

26 

Mountain Tourism in Germany:

Challenges and Opportunities in

Addressing Seasonality at

Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Joel T. Schmidt,1* Christian H. Werner1 and Harold Richins2

1

University of Applied Management, Erding, Germany;

2

Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Introduction

Mountain tourism has traditionally had a preponderance of visitors during the winter high season, associated particularly with snow sports and related activities (Hudson, 2004; Mill, 2007;

Pegg et al., 2012). Over the last few decades, a number of changes and enhancements to the experiences people may have in mountain destinations has provided for an increased diversity of options (Godde et al., 2000; Needham and

Rollins, 2005; Flognfeldt and Tjørve, 2013;

De Grave, 2014; Whistler, 2015).

Some mountain destinations have had challenges, however, in reinvigorating their infrastructure and amenity provision to accommodate an increased interest in other seasonal activities, as they have been more oriented toward snow sports experiences (Mill, 2007;

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