15 Chapters
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15: Conclusions and Way Forward

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

15 

Conclusions and Way Forward

P.K. Joshi1* and Floor Brouwer2

International Food Policy Research Institute, New Delhi, India;

2

LEI Wageningen, UR, The Hague, The Netherlands

1

Introduction

India has registered impressive economic growth of 7–8% following economic liberalization in 1991. Consequently, there has generally been a reduction in poverty levels in both rural and urban areas, and the impact is clearly visible during the post-reform period.

Agriculture also performed better during the previous decade with an average annual growth rate of more than 3.5%. The agricultural sector witnessed a structural transformation which was not just restricted to the farm sector. Unfolding patterns include integration of agriculture with other non-farm activities (e.g. processing and retailing), farmers linkages with markets, and opening-up of the economy for many agricultural commodities for trade. The paradigm shift was a result of various policy initiatives and reforms in agricultural and non-agricultural sectors.

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13: High-value Production and Poverty: The Case of Dairy in India

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

13 

High-value Production and Poverty:

The Case of Dairy in India

Anneleen Vandeplas,1,2* Mara P. Squicciarini1 and Johan F.M. Swinnen1

1

LICOS, Center for Institutions and Economic Performance

KU Leuven, Belgium; 2European Commission, Brussels, Belgium

Introduction1

is traditionally considered as a sector that has strong potential for pro-poor growth in the

Rising incomes and expanding urbanization country (Das, 2006; Goswami, 2007). Dairy are rapidly changing dietary patterns in India animals have traditionally been serving as and other Asian countries. People are not the main source of draught power in the only consuming more food, but also diversify- fields, as well as for subsistence milk proing increasingly towards high-value commod- duction. The Indian dairy sector is dominities, such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, ated by small production units (hence, with meat, fish, eggs, etc. (Kumar and Birthal, a small number of animals). This means that

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6: India: Economic Growth and Income Distribution in Rural and Urban Areas

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6 

India: Economic Growth and Income

Distribution in Rural and Urban Areas

G. Mythili*

Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India

Introduction

India has registered an impressive gross

­domestic product (GDP) growth of 7–8% after launching economic liberalization in 1991.

Reforms were initiated in the public sector, financial sector and investment and trade regimes and this helped in better integration with the global economy. However, its crucial sector, agriculture, which is the source of livelihood for nearly two-thirds of the population, has lost its momentum. The sector is lagging behind at less than 3% growth and its share in GDP is falling sharply over the years. Moreover, the economy has witnessed a significant structural transformation in both agricultural production and consumption in the past decade or so.

The performance of the economy over the years has been marked by higher rates of savings, investments, and improvements in many other macroeconomic indicators. The investment to GDP ratio went up to 34% in

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7: Food Safety Standards for Domestic and International Markets: The Case of Dairy

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

7 

Food Safety Standards for Domestic and

International Markets: The Case of Dairy

Anneleen Vandeplas*1,2 and Mara P. Squicciarini2

European Commission, Brussels, Belgium; 2LICOS, Center for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven, Belgium

1

Introduction

Several chapters in this volume address the question of how demand and supply for key food commodities will evolve in India over the next 20 years, and in particular, whether

India will become deficit or surplus in these commodities by 2030. This is a question of high policy relevance to Indian policy makers, who have historically attached major importance to the issue of food self-sufficiency; in other words, of being able to produce all food commodities it needs by itself.1 However, over the next decades, quantitative considerations of food supply may need to be complemented by qualitative considerations as concerns for food safety and quality2 are becoming increasingly important.

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8: India’s Poultry Sector: Trade Prospects

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8 

India’s Poultry Sector: Trade Prospects

Rajesh Mehta,1* R.G. Nambiar2 and P.K. Joshi3†

Formerly of Research and Information System for Developing

Countries, New Delhi; 2FLAME University, Pune, Maharashtra;

3

International Food Policy Research Institute, New Delhi, India

1

Introduction

Today, poultry is one of the fastest growing segments of Indian agriculture and the poultry industry is growing at the rate of

8–10% per annum. India is also the third largest producer of eggs and the sixth largest producer of chicken meat in the world and has the potential to emerge as the world leader in poultry. India is also an exporter of poultry meat and eggs to the European

Union (EU), the Middle East and neighbouring South Asian countries. As of today, Indian poultry exports constitute only a fraction of the total world trade. The domestic poultry industry is definitely price competitive, and India is gifted with natural resources that favour the growth of poultry.

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