15 Chapters
Medium 9781780642826

14: Changing Structure of Retail in India: Looking Beyond Price Competition

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

14 

Changing Structure of Retail in India:

Looking Beyond Price Competition

Devesh Roy,1* Shwetima Joshi,2 P.K. Joshi1 and Bhushana Karandikar3

1

International Food Policy Research Institute, New Delhi,

India; 2University of Texas, El Paso, USA; 3 Indian School of

Political Economy, Pune, India

Introduction

The food and grocery segment in organized retail has been growing at a fast pace in

India. The compound annual growth rate of food and grocery in organized retail has been estimated to be 16% during 2004–2007

(Joseph et al., 2008). The India Retail Report

(GoI, 2007) put the growth rate of the organized food and grocery sector at 42% in 2006 over 2005. The report by Planet Retail

(2004) projected the sales of the top five

­grocery retailers in India to grow from US$1 billion in 2007 to US$15 billion in 2012, a

15-fold increase in 5 years. It is expected that these changes comprising the growth of the organized sector vis-à-vis unorganized retail would be more pronounced with

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780642826

4: Food Demand and Supply Projections to 2030: India

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

4 

Food Demand and Supply Projections to 2030: India

Praduman Kumar1* and P.K. Joshi2

Division of Agricultural Economics, Indian Agricultural Research Institute,

New Delhi; 2International Food Policy Research Institute, New Delhi, India

1

Introduction

Achieving food self-sufficiency has always been the primary objective of agricultural policy in India. Driven by rising population, growing economy, expanding urbanization and changing tastes and preferences, the demand for food is continuously increasing in the country. On the other side, India is facing the problems of plateauing productivity, decreasing farm sizes and diminishing natural resources. This scenario has raised questions such as: ‘Will India be able to produce enough to meet its growing food demand or will it be open for imports of food commodities by 2030? What would be the likely trends of future demand for various food commodities? Will the supply of key food commodities continue to keep pace with their demand?’ These questions need to be answered in order to evolve an appropriate strategy for meeting the future demand for food commodities in India. In this chapter, an attempt has been made to project the demand for and supply of key food commodities by 2020 and 2030. It also assesses their trade potential by computing demand– supply gaps. This information will help to evolve appropriate medium- and long-term strategies in the Indian food sector.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780642826

5: Indian Economic Growth and Trade Agreements: What Matters for India and for Global Markets?

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

5 

Indian Economic Growth and Trade

Agreements: What Matters for India and for Global Markets?

Geert Woltjer* and Martine Rutten

Public Issues Division, LEI Wageningen UR, The Hague, The Netherlands

Introduction

India is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. Despite global downturn, India has recorded an average growth rate of 7.6% per year over the past decade

(IMF, 2012), with growth expected to rise again to 6.3% in 2014. This growth rate is well above the 2.1% growth estimated for the advanced economies (including the

USA, the Euro area and Japan) and the 3.8% growth for the world average (IMF, 2013).

Given that India has a relatively large population of over 1.2 billion, which is estimated to grow to around 1.6 billion by 2050 (UN,

2012), it is very likely that the development path followed by India influences the world economy. India’s trade with the world is estimated at €815 billion in 2012, which represents a fairly small share of less than 2% in world trade (WTO, 2012; European Commission, 2013). Although India is currently little integrated with the world economy, merchandise trade is growing fast at a rate of 17% per year since 2005, which is more than twice the global growth rate (WTO,

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780642826

6: India: Economic Growth and Income Distribution in Rural and Urban Areas

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

6 

India: Economic Growth and Income

Distribution in Rural and Urban Areas

G. Mythili*

Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India

Introduction

India has registered an impressive gross

­domestic product (GDP) growth of 7–8% after launching economic liberalization in 1991.

Reforms were initiated in the public sector, financial sector and investment and trade regimes and this helped in better integration with the global economy. However, its crucial sector, agriculture, which is the source of livelihood for nearly two-thirds of the population, has lost its momentum. The sector is lagging behind at less than 3% growth and its share in GDP is falling sharply over the years. Moreover, the economy has witnessed a significant structural transformation in both agricultural production and consumption in the past decade or so.

The performance of the economy over the years has been marked by higher rates of savings, investments, and improvements in many other macroeconomic indicators. The investment to GDP ratio went up to 34% in

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780642826

13: High-value Production and Poverty: The Case of Dairy in India

Brouwer, F.; Joshi, P.K. CABI PDF

13 

High-value Production and Poverty:

The Case of Dairy in India

Anneleen Vandeplas,1,2* Mara P. Squicciarini1 and Johan F.M. Swinnen1

1

LICOS, Center for Institutions and Economic Performance

KU Leuven, Belgium; 2European Commission, Brussels, Belgium

Introduction1

is traditionally considered as a sector that has strong potential for pro-poor growth in the

Rising incomes and expanding urbanization country (Das, 2006; Goswami, 2007). Dairy are rapidly changing dietary patterns in India animals have traditionally been serving as and other Asian countries. People are not the main source of draught power in the only consuming more food, but also diversify- fields, as well as for subsistence milk proing increasingly towards high-value commod- duction. The Indian dairy sector is dominities, such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, ated by small production units (hence, with meat, fish, eggs, etc. (Kumar and Birthal, a small number of animals). This means that

See All Chapters

See All Chapters