12 Chapters
Medium 9781780648156

7: Climate Variability and Agriculture

Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P. CABI PDF

Climate Variability and

Agriculture

7

A.V.R. Kesava Rao,* Suhas P. Wani and K. Srinivas

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics

(ICRISAT), Patancheru, India

7.1  Introduction

Evidence over the past few decades has shown that significant changes in climate are taking place all over the world as a result of enhanced human activities in deforestation, emission of various greenhouse gases and indiscriminate use of fossil fuels. The results of climate change research indicate that climate variability and change may lead to more frequent weather-related disasters in the form of floods, droughts, landslides and sea level rise. Many countries, including India, are making efforts to undertake adaptation measures as well as to mitigate the challenges posed by global warming and climate change. There is an urgent need to develop a climate change network for Indian agriculture that will go a long way to build the resilience of the community to cope with the impacts of climate change, particularly in rainfed areas

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780648156

3: Soil Nutrient Mapping for On-farm Fertility Management

Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P. CABI PDF

Soil Nutrient Mapping for On-farm

Fertility Management

3

K.L. Sahrawat,† Suhas P. Wani, Girish Chander,*

G. Pardhasaradhi and K. Krishnappa

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid

Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, India

3.1  Introduction

Feeding the projected population of 9.1 billion globally and 1.6 billion in India by 2050 is one of the greatest challenges of the century, and in this endeavour to ensure future food security, efficient soil nutrient management is crucial (Wani et al., 2003; Sahrawat et al.,

2010; Chander et al., 2013). Since the era of the Green Revolution in

India in the late 1960s, the focus has been on only three macronutrients, namely nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), and this has brought nutrient imbalances and widespread deficiencies of micro and secondary nutrients such as sulfur (S), boron (B) and zinc

(Zn) in addition to macronutrients (Wani et al., 2009; Sahrawat and

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780648156

2: Evolution of Bhoochetana

Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P. CABI PDF

Evolution of Bhoochetana

2

Suhas P. Wani*

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid

Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, India

2.1  Introduction

Long-term experiments at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) campus since 1976 as well as a number of studies in different countries (Rockström et al., 2007; Wani et al., 2008) clearly showed that current farmers’ field yields were lower than their potential yields by two- to fivefold. These studies also demonstrated that there exists a large potential to increase farmers’ crop yields by adopting available technologies. However, large yield gaps are largely due to lack of knowledge about the improved management practices for increasing productivity for the farmers and not due to lack of technologies (Wani et al., 2008). If we can bridge the knowledge gap and make the necessary inputs needed for implementing improved management practices (seeds, fertilizers, credit, etc.) on farmers’ fields, productivity can be substantially increased by bridging the yield gaps. With this knowledge and pilot studies in Adarsha Watershed, Kothapally, India, as well as other watersheds in different parts of the country, it was demonstrated that yields from farmers’ fields can be substantially increased by up to 240%, providing farmers have the right information and inputs at the right time at the right price. By adopting a holistic approach, yield gaps even on small farmers’ fields were successfully bridged and farmers benefited with increased productivity and profitability with the help

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780648156

9: An Integrated Approach for Productivity Enhancement

Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P. CABI PDF

An Integrated Approach for

Productivity Enhancement

9

Gajanan Sawargaonkar,* Sudi

Raghavendra Rao and Suhas P. Wani

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid

Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, India

9.1  Introduction

During the past six decades, state agricultural universities (SAUs) in India, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) institutes and international centres have invested efforts to develop improved agricultural technologies for poor tropical and subtropical countries targeting the innovations that could yield quick benefits. However, agricultural research emphasizes mainly component- and commodity-based research involving improvement of the genetic base of potential crops in order to enhance productivity and improve resistance to pests and diseases, development of animal breeding, farm implements and machinery, fertilizer use, and other production and protection technologies. These technologies are mostly conducted in isolation and at the institute level, which enables the farmers to increase productivity, but this has led to overexploitation of natural resources, resulting in decreased factor productivity and resource use efficiency, and ultimately decreased farm productivity and profitability

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780648156

4: Human Capacity Development to Adopt Best Practices

Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P.; Raju, K.V.; Wani, S.P. CABI PDF

Human Capacity Development to Adopt Best Practices

4

K.H. Anantha,* Suhas P. Wani, Girish Chander and Gajanan Sawargaonkar

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics

(ICRISAT), Patancheru, India

4.1  Introduction

The concept of capacity development, which emerged during the 1980s, gained prominence in the 1990s and currently has wide usage in community development (Eade, 1997; UNDP, 1998; Bolger, 2000). The term capacity development is usually discussed as an approach to development and cooperation. Capacity development encompasses human resource development as an essential part of development (FAO, 1998).

It is a process by which individuals, groups, organizations and societies enhance their abilities to identify and meet development challenges in a sustainable manner (UNDP, 1998). It is human resource development, which is a process of equipping individuals with the understanding of access to information, knowledge, training and skills that enables them to perform effectively. There is a direct relationship between capacity building and agricultural education.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters