20 Chapters
Medium 9781780648620

3 Roles of Adventure Guides in Balancing Perceptions of Risk and Safety

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

3

Roles of Adventure Guides in

Balancing Perceptions of Risk and

Safety

Arild Røkenes*,1 and Line Mathisen2

1UiT

The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway; 2Northern

Research Institute, Alta, Norway

Introduction

Risk is usually associated with dangerous situations. However, for adventure tourists, the desire for risk is connected to the experiential values that these tourists associate with performing an activity, such as thrill, enjoyment and excitement

(Cater, 2006; Buckley, 2012; Mackenzie and

Kerr, 2012; Piekarz et al., 2015). In particular, desirable risk is a subjective evaluation based on previous and ongoing experiences; thus, the manner in which guides interact with tourists influences possibilities for co-creation of experiences, as well as tourists’ perceptions of risk.

Despite the influence the perceived risk of tourists can have on the value created when performing an adventure activity (­Mackenzie and

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1 Arctic Destinations and Attractions as Evolving Peripheral Settings for the Production and Consumption of Peak Tourism Experiences

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

1

Arctic Destinations and Attractions as Evolving Peripheral Settings for the

Production and Consumption of Peak

Tourism Experiences

Young-Sook Lee,*,1 David B. Weaver2 and

Nina K. Prebensen1,3

1UiT

The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway; 2Griffith

University, Gold Coast, Australia; 3Buskerud and Vestfold University

College, Borre, Norway

Background

The Arctic has attracted considerable research attention from various disciplines and this trend has intensified in recent decades. Reasons for this increased scrutiny include growing social and political foci on climate change that is felt sharply in the region (Sturm et al., 2001; Ford and Smit, 2004; Hinzman et al., 2005); increased debates over the sustainable use of natural and cultural resources of the Arctic

(Kaltenborn, 1998; Riedlinger and Berkes,

2001); and amplified geopolitical tensions that result from the opening of the region (Heininen and Nicol, 2007; Young, 2009). The Arctic tourism experiences described and analysed in this edited book are informed by all of these ‘macro issues’. Despite this increased interest in the macro issues in the Arctic area, there is still a need for knowledge regarding the micro issues, such as how to facilitate sustainable tourism.

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14 Factors of Peripherality: Whale Watching in Northern Norway

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

14

Factors of Peripherality: Whale

Watching in Northern Norway

Giovanna Bertella*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway

Introduction

This chapter reflects on the dialectic between the concepts of periphery and core; specifically, the paradox of tourists searching for core experiences in peripheral places (Hall, 2015; Weaver,

2015). Using a case study of wildlife tourism, the chapter investigates how periphery-related dimensions of a destination shape premises for core wildlife experiences.

When initially applied to tourism contexts, the notion of periphery was used to refer to rural areas around European urban centres.

More recently, periphery has also been used to refer to remote areas (Stonehouse and Snyder,

2010; Müller, 2015). Such areas are often characterized by the fragility of natural and social environments and the possibility of hosting wilderness experiences (Krakover and Gradus,

2002; Lemelin and Wiersma, 2007; Müller and

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5 Tourists and Narration in the Arctic: The Changing Experience of Museums

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

5

Tourists and Narration in the Arctic:

The Changing Experience of Museums

Johan Edelheim*,1 and Young-Sook Lee2

1University

of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland; 2UiT The Arctic

University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

Attractions, what they can be and their relation to narratives

Tourism without any form of tourist attractions does not make sense. Attractions are at the heart of tourism, the raison d’être for people to travel to different destinations and, in many cases, they are what is remembered and narrated during the journey or re-narrated after the journey. A narrow definition of attractions leads people to think of objects, specific places and iconic features in destinations. All of this is part of the truth, but a broader definition leads us to understand how feelings, stories, people, art and lived cultural features, to name just a few aspects, can also be attractions in travellers’ minds (Leiper, 2005). Beyond the more common superficial motivations, many journeys to geographical peripheries might be aiming for an experiential fulfilment that is not expressed even to the traveller self, apart from the journey and the goal. Due to the geographic extremeness the tourist is striving for, there is seldom a need along the way to verbalize an experiential expectation, since the goal seems to be enough.

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19 Tourism Experiences in Post-Soviet Arctic Borderlands

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

19

Tourism Experiences in Post-Soviet

Arctic Borderlands*

Peter Haugseth** and Urban Wråkberg

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Kirkenes, Norway

Introduction

The Euroarctic today has a rich and complex cultural heritage (Elenius et al., 2015) that is often overlooked in favour of its impressive natural attractions. Euroarctic tourism, accordingly, would gain from more knowledge about northern nomadizing peoples, acculturation processes, waves of immigration, geopolitical trends and periods of economic boom and bust.

These phenomena, which reveal a layered and convoluted cultural heritage imbued with flexible meanings for different observers, will be explored here in the context of guided tours conducted in Russia’s Murmansk region. In recent times the sparsely populated tundra and borderlands of the Euroarctic have transitioned from an almost completely closed, Cold War border zone between NATO member Norway and the Soviet Union (Tjelmeland, 2012) to a zone of geopolitical reconciliation. More specifically, the establishment of the so-called Barents

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