20 Chapters
Medium 9781780648620

11 Tourists’ Interpretations of a ‘Feelgood In Lapland’ Holiday – A Case Study

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

11

Tourists’ Interpretations of a

‘Feelgood in Lapland’ Holiday –

A Case Study

Raija Komppula*

University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland

Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the different meanings and components that different people respectively hold and associate with well-being tourism. As a consequence of the differing motivations, life situations and other situational factors of tourists, well-being tourism comprises several sub-segments to which the value of a well-being holiday should respect­ ively be marketed. This chapter is informed by a study that aimed to find out what kind of interpretations customers of a hotel chain formed about a ‘Feelgood in Lapland’ experience. The initiative for the study came from the hotel chain. Based on the findings of the study, the hotel chain was able to develop the components of Feelgood offerings and market the experience to different target segments.

The chapter presents a case study undertaken in Finnish Lapland, which is the home of a private hotel chain with 13 hotels. The company has facilities close to wilderness areas on the fringes of national parks, and also in skiing centres. The motivation for the study was the need to develop the components of one of the product lines of the company, entitled ‘Feelgood’. This product relates to well-being tourism offerings. In a Nordic context, the term

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6 World Heritage List = Tourism Attractiveness?

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

6

World Heritage List = Tourism

Attractiveness?

Kjell Olsen*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

Heritage discourse is one that involves different fields of valorization. In some fields, old objects are valued for what they can tell us about the past, their aesthetic qualities or use value. In other fields, such as identity politics and the economy, the past is valued as a resource for new industries. One of the specific values attached to heritage is the capability of such objects and sites to attract tourists. Within global

UNESCO discourse, in the White Papers of

Norwegian ministries, as well as in local Nor­ wegian debates, the argument emerges that heritage, especially World Heritage listings, will attract visitors and provide local economic

­benefit. However, as Robinson and Silverman

(2015: 14) point out, not all heritages and heritage sites are popular and many of them ‘would be hard-pressed to stimulate any significant emotional response from tourists’ (Robinson,

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20 Arctic Tourism Experiences: Opportunities, Challenges and Future Research Directions for a Changing Periphery

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

20

Arctic Tourism Experiences:

Opportunities, Challenges and

Future Research Directions for a

Changing Periphery

Young-Sook Lee,*,1 David B. Weaver2 and

Nina K. Prebensen1,3

1UiT

The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway; 2Griffith

University, Australia; 3Buskerud and Vestfold University College,

Borre, Norway

Introduction

Macro-level issues such as climate change and heightened efforts for sustainable future life have focused attention on the Arctic. It is not uncommon to be presented with comparable before-and-now photos of some Arctic scenes to demonstrate fast-melting ice and snow in the region and the subsequent effects such as rising sea level (Hodell et al., 1991), changing flora and fauna (Chapin et al., 2012), and subsidence and other changes associated with rapidly melting permafrost (Romanovsky and Osterkamp, 1997). In tandem with these macro-level climatological and geophysical trends, the Arctic has also been increasingly in the limelight as a tourist destination (Pashkevich, 2014). Much of the attention given to the Arctic in tourism studies, indeed, can be attributed to the omnipresent effects of climate change, which is felt imminently and acutely in the region. However, the bigger and more ominous matter of global climate change and sustainable future life seem to occupy most research and business efforts, so that parallel efforts to understand their implications for Arctic tourism are still rather limited.

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8 Northern Lights Experiences in the Arctic Dark: Old Imaginaries and New Tourism Narratives

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

8

Northern Lights Experiences in the

Arctic Dark: Old Imaginaries and

New Tourism Narratives

Stein R. Mathisen*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

During the first decades of the third millennium, businesses offering ‘northern lights tourism’ activities have established themselves as some of the fastest-growing tourism businesses in northern Scandinavia (Northern Norway Tourist Board, 2016; Visit Norway, 2016). This development is evident in other Arctic and

­sub-Arctic areas, where the celestial phenomena of the aurora borealis frequently appear, and where destinations are relatively accessible to travelling visitors. Since 2000, due to increased solar activity and magnetic storms, there has been enhanced northern lights activity. Contemporaneously, interest in the Arctic areas and circumpolar regions has increased.

The landscapes in which the northern lights are now abundantly appearing have increasingly become strategically and politically important.

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16 Long Way Up: Powered Two-wheeled Journeys in Northern Peripheries

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

16

Long Way Up: Powered Twowheeled Journeys in Northern

Peripheries

Carl Cater*

Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK

Introduction

The opening of the continental Arctic for tourism has been largely facilitated by the extensive road building programmes of the 20th century.

While primarily aimed at the economic development and resource exploitation of these peripheral regions, the visitor economy has followed the branches of this network, and in many Arctic areas tourism is now a significant driver of development. The flexibility afforded by drive tourism in places that have traditionally been relatively inaccessible by public transport has particularly favoured the development of this sector. Drive tourism in general has received some scrutiny (for example Prideaux and

­Carson, 2011) as part of ‘the recognition that growing numbers of people desire a free and independent travel experience’ (Shih, 2006:

1029). Further, this freedom means that drive tourism is influential in the regional dispersal of tourism and is therefore particularly important for peripheral destinations. A specific subsector that has seen notable growth is that of motorcycle tourists, who have found a powerful attraction in the open and dramatic spaces of the continental Arctic.

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