20 Chapters
Medium 9781780648620

15 Responsible Fishing Tourism in the Arctic

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

15

Responsible Fishing Tourism in the

Arctic

Nina K. Prebensen*1,2 and Sølvi Lyngnes3

1Buskerud

and Vestfold University College, Borre, Norway; 2UiT

The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway; 3BI Norwegian

Business School, Oslo, Norway

Introduction

Fishing tourism is an industry in which its actors

– that is, firms, destinations and customers – benefit from utilizing nature-based resources.

This practice can be performed in a responsible or an irresponsible way. As the tourist is the vital actor performing fishing activities in a natural environment, a central route to ensure a more responsible tourism industry is to help and teach the tourist to act in a responsible way. Williams and Ponsford (2009) claim that more collective and vision-oriented approaches to tourism industry planning are needed to address broader and more pervasive environmental and sustainability challenges.

This chapter highlights different types of fishing tourism in the Arctic and discusses how the industry can become responsible through its customers. The chapter ends by presenting a practical tool, the business canvas model

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12 Negotiating Sami Place and Identity: Do Scottish Traditions Help Sami to be More Sami?

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

12

Negotiating Sami Place and Identity:

Do Scottish Traditions Help Sami to be More Sami?

Beate Bursta*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

Imagine a quiet village in northernmost Norway.

Imagine it lively here. Boats in the harbour, loaded with fish from the fjord. The air mixed with heavy smells of fish hung up to dry. Children playing around the scattered houses. Women walking between kitchens and barns, taking care of sheep and households. The boarding school filled with children from smaller nearby villages.

A hundred years ago, it was lively here. A hundred years ago, nearly everyone had mastered the Sami language; today, hardly anyone. The school did a good job with the children, turning them into proper Norwegians.

Finally, when the road was built connecting this place by land to the rest of the world, the ­village became even busier. Twice a day, the ferry unloaded and reloaded cars and people who were passing through. After a while, the ferry’s arrival became the liveliest moment in the village. Why? Because people had started moving out, not only from this village, but also from all the little surrounding villages. The boarding school closed down. Nevertheless, there were still enough children in the fjord to keep it going, for a few more years. During the vital years, many institutions were established here connecting the village to the emerging

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6 World Heritage List = Tourism Attractiveness?

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

6

World Heritage List = Tourism

Attractiveness?

Kjell Olsen*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

Heritage discourse is one that involves different fields of valorization. In some fields, old objects are valued for what they can tell us about the past, their aesthetic qualities or use value. In other fields, such as identity politics and the economy, the past is valued as a resource for new industries. One of the specific values attached to heritage is the capability of such objects and sites to attract tourists. Within global

UNESCO discourse, in the White Papers of

Norwegian ministries, as well as in local Nor­ wegian debates, the argument emerges that heritage, especially World Heritage listings, will attract visitors and provide local economic

­benefit. However, as Robinson and Silverman

(2015: 14) point out, not all heritages and heritage sites are popular and many of them ‘would be hard-pressed to stimulate any significant emotional response from tourists’ (Robinson,

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18 Arctic Tourism in Russia: Attractions, Experiences, Challenges and Potentials

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

18

Arctic Tourism in Russia:

Attractions, Experiences,

Challenges and Potentials

Sergey Ilkevich*,1 and Per Strömberg2

1Russian

State University of Tourism and Service, Moscow Region,

Russia 2University College of Southeast Norway, Bø, Norway

Introduction

For a westerner, Arctic tourism in Russia is generally associated with atomic icebreaker vessels, pristine natural landscapes in vast peripheral areas with extreme conditions that are suitable for hunting and fishing, indigenous communities isolated from modern centres and, finally, in the far north, post-Soviet nostalgia related to abandoned military establishments. Of course, this represents only part of the picture of Russian Arctic tourism and is not dissimilar to other parts of the Arctic involved in tourism. However, there are many more nuances of tourism in the Russian Arctic that remain under-utilized or under-recognized. The Russian Arctic is one of the last great wildernesses on Earth and geographically encompasses the largest part of the

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8 Northern Lights Experiences in the Arctic Dark: Old Imaginaries and New Tourism Narratives

Lee, Y.-S.; Weaver, D.B.; Prebensen, N.K. CABI PDF

8

Northern Lights Experiences in the

Arctic Dark: Old Imaginaries and

New Tourism Narratives

Stein R. Mathisen*

UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway

Introduction

During the first decades of the third millennium, businesses offering ‘northern lights tourism’ activities have established themselves as some of the fastest-growing tourism businesses in northern Scandinavia (Northern Norway Tourist Board, 2016; Visit Norway, 2016). This development is evident in other Arctic and

­sub-Arctic areas, where the celestial phenomena of the aurora borealis frequently appear, and where destinations are relatively accessible to travelling visitors. Since 2000, due to increased solar activity and magnetic storms, there has been enhanced northern lights activity. Contemporaneously, interest in the Arctic areas and circumpolar regions has increased.

The landscapes in which the northern lights are now abundantly appearing have increasingly become strategically and politically important.

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