12 Chapters
Medium 9781780647753

11: Characterizing Farmer Innovation Behavior for Agricultural Technologies in Transitional Areas Facing Environmental Change

Chan, C.; Sipes, B.; Lee, T.S. CABI PDF

11 

Characterizing Farmer Innovation

Behavior for Agricultural Technologies in

Transitional Areas Facing Environmental

Change

1

Jacqueline Halbrendt1* and Bikash Paudel2

Wageningen University, Netherlands; 2Local Initiatives for Biodiversity,

Research and Development (LI-BIRD), Pokhara, Nepal

11.1  Introduction

Nepal has gone through tumultuous developments in the recent past and the country has a strong desire to bring about peace and political stability. During this transitional phase, the country faces a lot of challenges, among them a desire for economic development while facing poverty and natural disasters. In recent years, many

­development agencies have targeted Nepal as a country that requires aid assistance due to its poor humanitarian indicators. A popular mechanism is assisting small farmers with relevant information and technology to increase their productivity for enhanced nutrition and income, but not much is understood regarding farmers’ behavior toward innovations. This chapter attempts to discover some of the salient characteristics of farmers who adopt innovations and where they get their information.

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2: Comparing Agri-entrepreneurs in Non-conflict Regions versus Conflict and Transitional Economies

Chan, C.; Sipes, B.; Lee, T.S. CABI PDF

2 

Comparing Agri-entrepreneurs in Non-conflict Regions versus Conflict and Transitional Economies

Pauline Sullivan*

Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee

2.1  Introduction

the ethnic minority population is growing and young, with comparatively large families (EuroThis chapter discusses agri-entrepreneurship monitor International, 2015). This group of in non-conflict zones, conflict zones, and tran- consumers are an attractive market for agri-­ sitional economies. The introduction provides entrepreneurs with niche products that are culan overview of global agriculture and entrepre- turally relevant to these customers. Similarly, there neurship, followed by separate sections for non-­ is an increasing number of Muslims around the conflict zones, conflict zones, and transitional world, some of whom observe dietary traditions. economies. Each section describes the region The demand for value-added Halal foods will grow. in general, then examines the agricultural secGlobal warming will affect agri-entrepreneurs tor in each group, and lastly discusses agri-­ in non-conflict zones, conflict zones, and tranentrepreneurship. The final section compares sitional economies (World Bank, 2011). Weasimilarities and dissimilarities among agri-­ ther patterns are increasingly volatile and affect entrepreneurs in the three groups. growing seasons. There is a need for agri-­

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7: Allowing Entrepreneurs to Save Profits is Important to Motivation, Sustainability, and Resilience: Can All Cultures Support This?

Chan, C.; Sipes, B.; Lee, T.S. CABI PDF

7 

Allowing Entrepreneurs to Save Profits is

Important to Motivation, Sustainability, and

Resilience: Can All Cultures Support This?

James R. Hollyer*

University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam

7.1  Introduction

Successful international development—skill development that creates societal transformation rather than a transfer of wealth—requires a keen understanding of the culture where one works (Hall, 1976). As leadership and business guru Peter Drucker said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” All the great strategy and plans in the world will not create change or transformation if they do not, in some way, benefit the existing culture (or those in power). Anything that threatens a culture’s norms will be resisted by those who benefit from the status quo (Morris et al., 2011). In some cases, sole entrepreneurs striking out on their own to make their

“fortune” are such a threat in some countries’ cultures. Entrepreneurs are especially threatening in cultures where collective behaviors frown on individual success because it disturbs the status quo or the culture’s version of “sustainable” or “equilibrium” (Hall, 1976). Yet, a huge untapped potential of creativity and hard work exists just waiting to be given to the world’s 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and

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8: Assessing Gender Gaps in Information Delivery for Better Farming Decisions: The Case of Albania

Chan, C.; Sipes, B.; Lee, T.S. CABI PDF

8 

Assessing Gender Gaps in Information

Delivery for Better Farming Decisions:

The Case of Albania

Edvin Zhllima1* and Klodjan Rama2

Agriculture University of Tirana, Albania; 2European University of Tirana, formerly

Leibniz Institute of Agriculture Development in Transition Economies

(IAMO) and Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

1

8.1  Introduction

Public sector agricultural advisory services remain one of the most crucial and critical mechanisms to enhance farmers’ efficiency and profitability in both developed and developing countries. These services are means for disseminating and changing the modality of supply and adoption of innovative technologies. In transitioning economies, including those exiting conflict or the transitional ones, where structural and institutional changes happen rapidly during the transition, well functioning agricultural advisory services are critical for delivering effective new practices and knowledge to farmers.

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6: Coping Strategies for Youth Entrepreneurs in Conflict Areas

Chan, C.; Sipes, B.; Lee, T.S. CABI PDF

6 

Coping Strategies for Youth

Entrepreneurs in Conflict Areas

Tina S. Lee,1* Katherine A. Wilson,1 Catherine Chan,1

Jovelyn Bantilan2 and Emilie Bayona2

1

University of Hawai‘i at Maˉnoa, Honolulu, Hawaii;

2

Southern Christian College, Midsayap, Philippines

6.1  Introduction

Entrepreneurship is considered a pathway to global peace and economic development that increases localized economic freedom for marginalized populations to escape the poverty trap

(Strong, 2010). Entrepreneurship has been shown to have a positive impact on job creation, economic growth, and innovation creation (Van

Praag and Versloot, 2008). In countries or regions that have dire need to increase jobs and growth, entrepreneurship has been recognized as a solution. International development aid funds have designed and implemented market development initiatives to help crisis and post-crisis areas by increasing the participation of small enterprises in the economy (SEEP,

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