25 Chapters
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Chapter Eight: The Neurobiological Pathways of Murderous Rage and Guilt

Hickey, Catherine Karnac Books ePub

The first interview focused on the major mobilisation of the patient's unconscious and the total removal of the resistance. The next two interviews focused on the patient's transference neurosis with a previous therapist and the metapsychological and treatment considerations of this. The fourth interview in the series focused on the use of MUSC throughout the interview process and how MUSC are the building blocks for change in the patient's defensive and character structure. This next interview will focus specifically on the neurobiological pathways of murderous rage and guilt.

Vignette I: the phase of enquiry and the therapeutic task

TH: So we are meeting again.

PT: Yes.

TH: And you look forward to it?

PT: Yes.

TH: And again we move to this principle of honesty.

TH: To explore the most painful issues and honesty is the principle. How do you feel right now?

PT: I was anxious in the room.

TH: How do you feel right now?

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Chapter Six: Transference Neurosis: Part II

Hickey, Catherine Karnac Books ePub

The following case is a continuation of the previous chapter with a continued focus on the transference neurosis that had developed in a prior course of therapy. In the first session of the closed circuit training programme, the patient had a massive passage of murderous rage towards the therapist, an impulse to sadistically torture and murder him, and, finally, a massive passage of guilt as she looked into the eyes of the therapist and saw the green eyes of her grandmother. In the second session, she had a similar experience of murderous rage and guilt towards the grandmother.

What follows are vignettes from the third closed circuit training session. This interview was first published in the International Journal of Psychotherapy (Hickey, 2015e). This interview raises a number of important concepts that reflect Dr Davanloo's current-day understanding of the technique. Since this interview has been reviewed in multiple settings (Davanloo, 2013a, 2014a), there have been numerous group discussions on the themes it raises. These will be reviewed in detail at the end of this chapter.

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Chapter Thirteen: Pathological Mourning and the Mobilised Unconscious

Hickey, Catherine Karnac Books ePub

We continue with the tenth interview in the series. The focus of this interview will be pathological mourning. Specifically, Davanloo's approach to working with and removing pathological mourning will be illustrated through further vignettes. But before we can explore this further, there must be a brief review of the history of pathological mourning.

Freud first explored this concept in “Mourning and Melancholia” (Freud, 1917e). He noted that the deep feelings a patient experienced with the loss of a loved one were very similar to the feelings that a patient with melancholia experienced. Individuals suffering from melancholia shared the same loss of interest in the outside world and were absorbed in their own intra-psychic worlds. However, mourning was seen as a normal phenomenon whereas melancholia was viewed as a medical condition that required active intervention and treatment. Mourning occurred after an actual and apparent loss and was experienced as a conscious emotion. Melancholia did not occur after an actual death and the loss was seen as an unconscious one.

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Chapter Twenty Two: The Metapsychology of Forgiveness

Hickey, Catherine Karnac Books ePub

We are approaching the end of this series of interviews. As we review the twenty-second interview, it is clear that a number of principles have been recently discovered by Dr Davanloo. He has gone on to expand his metapsychology to include a number of sophisticated new elements in his approach to the unconscious.

With this more sophisticated understanding of the unconscious come numerous questions. As we approach the end of the interviews, the reader will undoubtedly be asking questions in an attempt to gain greater understanding and familiarity with the unconscious and how it works. Some of these questions may (or may not) include the following:

1. How do I begin to operationalise these concepts in my work with patients?

2. How do I begin to appreciate the subtlety and nuance of this work, both theoretically (from an academic perspective) and clinically (from a patient perspective)?

3. How do I know if I am applying this technique correctly? What can I do to ensure my competency in providing this technique?

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Chapter Seventeen: The Neurobiological Destruction of the Uterus

Hickey, Catherine Karnac Books ePub

We move on with the seventeenth interview of the series. By now, many of Davanloo's newer concepts should be familiar to the reader. One concept that has been touched on in previous chapters (albeit in less detail than what is covered in this chapter) is the neurobiological destruction of the uterus.

In some of the patient's previous breakthroughs, she has violently destroyed the uterus of the therapist. The visual image of the murdered body of the therapist and the destroyed uterus transferred to the visual image of the murdered body of an important genetic figure—usually the grandmother. The destruction of the uterus has dramatic psychodynamic implications. In this case, the patient is caught in a destructive competitiveness that triangulates her between her mother and grandmother. She wishes to destroy the grandmother to achieve closeness with the mother and vice versa. So destroying the uterus of the grandmother has extreme significance for her. It accomplishes her intra-psychic goal of achieving the undivided love of her grandmother (in the absence of her mother). But it also creates a tremendous volume of guilt towards the mother and grandmother as well.

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