23 Chapters
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17 Climate Change and Coping Strategies for Sustainable Food Production Among Small-scale Farmers in Nigeria

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17 

Climate Change and Coping

Strategies for Sustainable Food Production

Among Small-scale Farmers in Nigeria

Ibrahim Folorunsho Ayanda1

Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria

Introduction

Nigeria has been facing and will continue to face many significant challenges associated with variations in temperature, precipitation, humidity and other climatic elements which have become the primary environmental threat of the

21st century. In past centuries the perception among the residents of rural areas in Nigeria was that drought and famine were punishments from God. In Nigeria, it is established that there are increases in the ambient temperature as well as inconsistency in the amount, duration and distribution of precipitation (Ajetunmobi and

Abiodun, 2010). Global warming is projected to have significant impacts on conditions such as temperature, precipitation and the interaction of these elements that affect agriculture. These climatic factors affect agriculture and determine the adequacy of food and fibre supplies in two important ways. Firstly, they influence weather hazards on crops and livestock. On the other hand they control the types of crops, livestock and other branches of agriculture that can thrive in a given area. In addition, they influence all the stages of the agricultural production chain, from land cultivation to marketing.

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16 Energy Production and Consumption for Sustainable Development

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16 

Energy Production and Consumption for Sustainable Development

Abel Olajide Olorunnisola1

University of Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria

Introduction

This chapter begins by defining the two key words or concepts: energy and sustainable development.

Energy

Energy is a Greek word, spelt ἐνέργεια or energeia, which possibly appeared for the first time in the work of Aristotle in the 4th century bc and was used to describe an activity or an operation.

As observed by Adenikiju (2012, p. 112):

. . . energy is a component of the natural resource. Like other natural resources, some are renewable and others are non-renewable.

However, energy is both a productive input and also provides final consumer services such as lighting, entertainment, among others. Energy has provided the fuel for modern economies. Its use has also generated significant negative impact on the environment and global warming.

The various energy sources that drive the various sectors of society today can be categorized as:

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15 Can Competitiveness be the Framework for Sustainable Electricity Supply in Nigeria?

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15 

Can Competitiveness be the

Framework for Sustainable Electricity

Supply in Nigeria?

Robert Madua1, Ann Ogbob and Zita Mmamela

Institute of Management and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria; bUniversity of ­Nigeria,

Enugu Campus, Nigeria

a

Introduction

Background

This chapter seeks to unravel the possible ways competitiveness in the Nigerian Power sector can enhance a sustainable electricity supply in the country. For this study, data was collected from available literature on the issue and analysed to determine the problems f acing the ­

­

Nigerian power sector and how competition can serve as a panacea for such problems. Paul ­Collier, the renowned Oxford

University Professor of African Economies, lamented while commenting on the importance of power to Nigerian economy and summed it up as: ‘No power, no future’. The future of

Nigeria is tied in with its ability to provide sustainable energy for private and business uses.

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4 Globalization and Sustainable Development in Africa: the Imperatives of Capacity Building

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4 

Globalization and Sustainable

Development in Africa: the Imperatives of Capacity Building

Chinyeaka Justine Igbokwe-Ibeto1

Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

Introduction

Globalization is a worldwide phenomenon that has turned the world into a global village. Theoretically, it is expected that such interactions would engender a new vista of opportunities as well as challenges. However, in the political economy of

African countries, its impact has been a mixed bag of the good, the bad and the ugly (Igbokwe-­

Ibeto et al., 2014). While there is increasing world involvement in Africa, the putative benefits of globalization on sustainable development are hardly visible on the continent, due to lack of capacity to take advantage of the opportunities created by globalization. This is where capacity building becomes a prime issue in developing human resources of developing countries so that each sector and industry can best tap the opportunities offered in globalization. Specifically, the new trend requires higher skills and knowledge and changes in the areas of decision and policy making, industrial production, skills training and education to cope with technological advancement and vagaries of the international market.

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18 Capacity Building for Rural Development in Nigeria: The Case of Rural Road Networks

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18 

Capacity Building for Rural

Development in Nigeria: The Case of Rural Road Networks

S. Tunji Titilolaa1 and Valentine Udoh Jamesb

Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Nigeria; bClarion University of Pennsylvania,

Clarion, USA

a

Introduction

The majority of Nigerians still reside in rural areas and are engaged in farm and non-farm activities. Agriculture, however, still remains the main source of income in rural areas.

Roads and other infrastructures are therefore essential to rural welfare as well as critical for accelerating agricultural and rural development (FMARD, 2016). This argument still holds in the year 2017. Past rural development-oriented efforts, such as Operation Feed the Nation, the Green Revolution Programmes and others have had limited success in many areas of N

­ igeria due in part to poor road infrastructures. Therefore, development of rural road networks is deemed critical for agricultural production and overall rural welfare and development. As noted by Tunde and Adeniyi

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