23 Chapters
Medium 9781780646169

10 Capacity Building and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

James, V. CABI PDF

10  a

Capacity Building and Economic

Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Robert Dibie1a, Felix Moses Edohob and Josephine Dibiea

Indiana University Kokomo, Indiana, USA; bLincoln University,

Jefferson City, Missouri, USA

Introduction

There have been many problems and challenges facing the African countries in the past four decades (World Economic Forum, 2015). The challenges range from lack of proactive initiatives for environmental sustainability to how to restore and revitalize economic growth (Dibie, 2014).

Some of these development challenges have been associated with lack of appropriate capacity building efforts. In addition, the low and inappropriate capacity building challenges have spilled over to severe political instability and poverty

(Ezana, 2011; Nwazor, 2013; UNDP, 2014). In some African countries, however, some of these development setbacks have been incrementally followed by favourable democratic and environmental renaissance (Gwin, 2014; World Economic Forum, 2015). On the other hand, these segmented improvements in the continent have become a model for economic growth. In countries where foreign investments have enhanced capacity building, these initiatives have brought about some levels of affordable energy, jobs, ­ revenues and an accompanying resurgence of manufacturing and agricultural products (UNDP, 2014).

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780646169

11 Business Sector and Global Sustainable Future

James, V. CABI PDF

11 

Business Sector and Global

Sustainable Future

Felix Moses Edoho1a and Robert Dibieb

Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri, USA; bIndiana University Kokomo,

Indiana, USA

1a

Introduction

The global environmental challenges of our time range from global warming, ozone depletion,

­deforestation and desertification, acid rain and declining biodiversity to toxic wastes (Millen­ nium Ecosystem Assessment, 2005; WWF, 2010;

Worldwatch Institute, 2010, 2011). Corporate industrial production has contributed significantly to these phenomena (Anderson, 2015; Kraft and

Furlong, 2017). It also accounts for the destruction of the natural habitats and colonies; contamination of ground waters and fish ponds; and release of greenhouse gas and toxic chemicals into the atmosphere (Bergesen and Parmann,

1995; Anderson, 2002; Shisanto, 2005; Utting and Ives, 2006; Mesa, 2007; Edoho, 2013;

­Anderson, 2015). Corporations in the resource extraction industries wreak havoc on the environment because they directly disturb and dislocate the ecosystems, causing the most severe impacts (Cragg and Greenbaum, 2002; Kapelus,

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780646169

14 Proactive Learning Framework: Educational Model for Capacity Building and Sustainable Development

James, V. CABI PDF

14 

Proactive Learning Framework:

Educational Model for Capacity Building and Sustainable Development

Victoria Oliaku Chiatula1

Indiana, USA

Introduction

Capacity building and sustainable development entail an educational model that is a proactive learning framework. By and large, both formal and informal education encompass the discipline of teaching and learning that involves ‘the act and process[es] of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life’ (Dictionary.com, 2015). The definition and application of education as described above and discussed in this chapter are within the grades K–5 primary learning context. E

­ ducation processes take on a multiplicity of approaches in terms of how students learn, what they learn, where they learn, and from whom they learn. Embedded within these processes are the socialization and enculturation of norms and mores which are transmitted through societies. In this role, education is the key to inculcating the content knowledge, skills, values and behaviours desired for societal change and transformation embedded within capacity building and sustainable development principles and targets. Specifically, education takes on a dimension of being ‘not simply about knowledge transfer and skills enhancement, [but] also about working with people to take charge of their own lives in a shared world’ (­Palmer, 2013, p. 306).

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780646169

16 Energy Production and Consumption for Sustainable Development

James, V. CABI PDF

16 

Energy Production and Consumption for Sustainable Development

Abel Olajide Olorunnisola1

University of Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria

Introduction

This chapter begins by defining the two key words or concepts: energy and sustainable development.

Energy

Energy is a Greek word, spelt ἐνέργεια or energeia, which possibly appeared for the first time in the work of Aristotle in the 4th century bc and was used to describe an activity or an operation.

As observed by Adenikiju (2012, p. 112):

. . . energy is a component of the natural resource. Like other natural resources, some are renewable and others are non-renewable.

However, energy is both a productive input and also provides final consumer services such as lighting, entertainment, among others. Energy has provided the fuel for modern economies. Its use has also generated significant negative impact on the environment and global warming.

The various energy sources that drive the various sectors of society today can be categorized as:

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780646169

23 Relationships of Climate Variability and Change to Development

James, V. CABI PDF

23  a

Relationships of Climate Variability and Change to Development

Anthony J. Vegaa1 and Robert V. Rohlib

Clarion University of Pennsylvania, USA; bLouisiana State University,

Baton Rouge, USA

Introduction

Any thoughtful and complete discussion of sustainable development in any region must

­ include consideration of the environmental

­

­controls that exist in that region. The long-term characterization of weather at a place, including the average, extremes and variability in weather parameters such as temperature, humidity, precipitation, fog and severe weather – the climate – is the primary environmental control. Climate affects and is affected by all other components of the natural environment. Therefore, geographers and environmental scientists usually consider the climate system, which includes not only the atmospheric features but also the components of the natural environment that interact with the atmosphere, such as ice-covered parts of the earth, the oceans and the terrain, rather than just the atmosphere in environmental analysis.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters