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11: Assessing the Benefits of Organic and Fair Trade Production for Small-scale Farmers in Asia

Parvathi, P.; Grote, U.; Waibel, H. CABI PDF

11 

Assessing the Benefits of Organic and Fair Trade Production for Small-scale

Farmers in Asia

Yuhui Qiao*

College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University,

Beijing, China

Organic agriculture and Fair Trade have the

­potential to provide improved livelihood opportunities, increased income and social benefits for small-scale farmers. The combination has thus become a popular strategy to reduce poverty in many developing countries. Cases of small-scale farmers who have both organic and Fair Trade certification in Asia will be analysed and summarized in this chapter.

11.1  Combination and

­ omplementarity of Organic and

C

Fair Trade Production: from Theory to Practice

Small-scale farmers in developing countries of

Asia, Latin America and Africa produce many bulk agricultural commodities. Most of them depend on agriculture as their main income

­ source, but sometimes they are faced with problems of low productivity, low prices received for their products and degradation of agroecological conditions. The majority of farmers in poverty worldwide depend on this sector for their livelihood; roughly 730 million are employed in agriculture in Asia, mostly as informal workers

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1: An Overview of Organic Agriculture and Fair Trade Systems

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1 

An Overview of Organic Agriculture and Fair Trade Systems

Priyanka Parvathi* and Hermann Waibel

Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics,

Leibniz University Hannover, Germany

1.1 Introduction

Since the Brundtland Commission coined the term

‘sustainable development’ in its report Our Common Future (Brundtland Commission, 1987), this approach has increasingly gained global prominence. The concept relating to agriculture and rural development has been at the heart of many discussions among supporters and sceptics of sustainability. In this context, eco-friendly and ethical aspects of production like organic agriculture and fair trade have been discussed. Also global awareness concerning economic development, social equity and environmental protection has grown considerably.

In international agricultural debates, certification systems like Fair Trade and organic farming are considered as serving niche markets.

Fair Trade certification is used as a unique selling proposition in markets like coffee, banana, cocoa, mango and traditional handicrafts. Organic certification is more centred on high-value markets like cotton, tea, coffee and spices. In recent years, organic fruit and vegetables have also captured consumer interest in the developed nations. Though extensive agricultural debates on these subjects are lacking, both these certification systems provide a possibility for agriculture

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2: Organic and Fairtrade Markets at a Glance

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2 

Organic and Fairtrade Markets at a Glance

Julia Lernoud and Helga Willer*

Department of Extension, Training and Communication, Research

Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Frick, Switzerland

2.1 Introduction

In this chapter, an overview of the global organic and Fairtrade market is presented(1). The data shown here were collected by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (Forschungsinstitut für biologischen Landbau (FiBL)) in the framework of its surveys on organic agriculture and Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS). The organic data are published annually in the statistical yearbook The World of Organic Agriculture (Willer and Lernoud, 2017)(2) by FiBL together with

­IFOAM – Organics International. The results of the

VSS survey are published in the report The State of Sustainable Markets (Lernoud et al., 2017)(3) produced in cooperation with the International

Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). These efforts are supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO). The Fairtrade

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14: Certifying Coffee Cooperatives in Ethiopia, India and Nicaragua: How Far Do Small-scale Coffee Producers Benefit?

Parvathi, P.; Grote, U.; Waibel, H. CABI PDF

14 

Certifying Coffee Cooperatives in Ethiopia, India and Nicaragua: How Far

Do Small-scale Coffee Producers Benefit?

Pradyot Ranjan Jena1,2*, Ulrike Grote2 and Till Stellmacher3

School of Management, National Institute of Technology, Karnataka, India; 2Institute for Environmental Economics and World Trade, Leibniz University Hannover,

Germany; 3Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, Germany

1

14.1 Introduction

Certification in general and coffee certification in particular are fuelled by consumer sensibility and awareness of what products they are buying and about the circumstances under which these products have been produced, processed and marketed. Increasingly consumers are willing to pay higher prices for products that meet certain required attributes. This movement has paved the way for bigger market shares of certified coffee in the major consuming countries and also created new opportunities for smallholder coffee producers in many developing countries to reap socio-economic benefits by participating in certified marketing channels.

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8: Consumers’ Information Search and Preferences for Fair Trade Coffee: a Case Study from Germany

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8 

Consumers’ Information Search and Preferences for Fair Trade Coffee: a Case Study from Germany

Rosa Schleenbecker1*, Katrin Zander2 and Ulrich Hamm1

Department of Agricultural and Food Marketing, University of Kassel, Germany;

2

Thünen Institute of Market Analysis, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas,

Forestry and Fisheries, Braunschweig, Germany

1

8.1 Introduction

The aim of this case study is to analyse

­consumers’ preferences as reflected in their information search when shopping for Fair Trade products. Information and its credibility play a crucial role since Fair Trade and organic products are, as described in Chapter 6, so-called credence goods (e.g. Padel and Foster, 2005; Janssen and Hamm, 2012). Information provided by food suppliers has to match consumers’ information needs in order to reduce the feeling of an information overload (Hwang and Lin, 1999; Verbeke,

2005). Knowing about consumers’ knowledge, motives and information search behaviour gives marketers the basis for designing effective communication measures.

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