11 Chapters
Medium 9781576751572

Chapter 1 The Nature of Multiple-Location T&D Systems

Krempl, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

In general, we can say that the larger the system becomes, the more the parts interact, the more difficult it is to understand environmental constraints, the more obscure becomes the problem of what resources should be made available, and deepest of all, the more difficult becomes the problem of the legitimate values of the system.

C. WEST CHURCHMAN

Vast business opportunities in Asia, South America, Africa, and other parts of the world have enticed many companies to expand their marketing and manufacturing capabilities worldwide. Truly, we are in a global age. Organizations all over the world are rushing to develop global operations. Odenwald (1993) has noted that “corporate human resource executives are setting up training management teams in regions around the world” (p. 160). This global expansion requires multinational corporations to examine how they manage the increased complexity of training and development (T&D) operations that involve multiple locations. Thus, we will begin by discussing the goals and impact of globalization on a multiple-location training organization and the three dilemmas that every training manager in this environment must face. How do we balance the desire for autonomy with the need for some central control and standardization? Do we position training and development near the power centers or near the people they serve? Do we want our professional staff seen as business managers or learning specialists?

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Chapter 7 How to Ensure Survival

Krempl, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage, than the creation of a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institutions and merely lukewarm defenders in those who would gain by the new ones.

MACHIAVELLI

With the multiple-location system and system review document developed and operational, the next step is to implement survival plans to ensure that all locations know how to operate skillfully within their political environment. As you know, the best training and development plans amount to little unless each field location is able to build bridges to critical power centers at all levels of the organization. In this chapter, we will look at nine critical success factors covering the gamut from planning to attitude to reliability. We will look at the creative tension between performance and politics and offer a case study on how that dynamic can derail your success. Finally, we will investigate how to respond to too many requests made too often and on too short a notice. Sound familiar?

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Chapter 6 How to Assess Performance

Krempl, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Measuring the return on investment (ROI) in training and development has consistently earned a place among the critical issues in the Human Resource Development (HRD) field. … Although the interest in the topic has heightened and much progress has been made, it is still an issue that challenges even the most sophisticated and progressive HRD departments.

JACK J. PHILLIPS

Conducting a regular audit is one of the most powerful ways to sustain a multiple-location training system. In this chapter we will describe exactly how to assess and review a multiple-location system and use assessment tools throughout the centers. Once you are comfortable with the tools, you can begin using the assessment results to develop local units using a teaching/consulting approach. Do you want to know whether the multiple-location system is being followed and how it is working? Then you must measure.

Whether the process is called a review, a measure, or an evaluation, each term means the same thing in this context, and each represents a systematic way of looking at the accomplishments of the various training organizations and their people. We recommend the system review document (Figure 6.1). Using this document at headquarters before you examine what the locations are doing is important because it shows your colleagues that gap analysis is not just for the “little” guys. The story of the old shoemaker applies well here. You may recall that the old shoemaker made shoes for everyone in the village. But his own children had no shoes. In just the same way the training director reviews his own processes and products before he says anything about other people’s operations.

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Contents

Krempl, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub
Medium 9781576751572

Chapter 2 A Model for Creating a Multiple-Location T&D System

Krempl, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

It is best to do things systematically, since we are only human, and disorder is our worst enemy.

HESIOD

A multiple-location T&D system can be characterized as a set of building blocks, with each block representing one aspect of the department. In this chapter we will describe this system and its components as viewed from two major perspectives: the training and development perspective and the business perspective. As seen in Figure 2.1, the system can be modeled after the classic ADDIE development process, covering all aspects from analysis to evaluation. For the system to stand as designed, each building block must be in place and held together with the “glue” of political savvy, which we will discuss in Chapter 7. If one block is missing, the structure is weakened.

The classic ADDIE process used for designing individual programs can be adapted to the design of a multiple location T&D system. As you learned in Chapter 1, the acronym ADDIE describes five steps in the instructional design process: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. From the training perspective, the upward arrows (Fig. 2.1) on the left side of the model summarize the process. It begins on the bottom row of blocks with an analysis (A) of the organization’s needs. The next row of blocks represents designing (D) an intervention or plan to respond to those needs. The third row of blocks represents developing (D) the tools to support the plan. The fourth stage entails implementing (I) the plan, and, finally, the fifth stage is evaluating (E) the results. Using a framework like ADDIE provides T&D professionals with a familiar framework for thinking about how to build a multiple-location organization. However, it is not the only perspective.

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