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16: Capturing Trapped Birds

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16

Capturing Trapped Birds

Learning Objectives

action, allow some time (up to 24 h, if possible) for the bird to free itself. Some helpful tips include:

1. Problems to expect after birds have been trapped in a chimney.

2. Tricks to capture warehouse birds.

• Opening all doors/windows and turning out lights.

• Turning off any ceiling fans.

• Trying to create an environment that is quiet and free of activity for at least a few hours.

Birds trapped in chimneys

Owls may be trapped in chimneys during the nesting season when they are looking for a cavity to nest in. A bird may fall into the actual fireplace but it is more common for it to be trapped above the flue. If the bird is located above the flue, the flue door may have to be removed in order to extract the bird. Wear goggles to protect your eyes from falling soot and debris. Use of a long flexible pole with a loop on the end can assist in snagging the bird and gently pulling it down.

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15: Housing and Husbandry

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15

Housing and Husbandry

Learning Objectives

1. Appropriate perching.

2. Basic cage construction details.

3. Minimum requirements for caging.

4. Resident bird husbandry basics.

5. Common husbandry problems.

Chain link fence secured on the ground around the perimeter for at least 2′ (0.6 m) is very effective

(Fig. 15.3).

Vertical slats

The walls should be made of vertical wood slats or other similar material. The important detail

Indoor housing

In general, birds of prey do well in dog and cat carriers, as long as these are modified to include a perch (Fig. 15.1; Table 15.1). The appropriate sized carrier should be provided so there is space above the bird’s head when it is on the perch.

Outdoor Cage Construction

Cages of the appropriate construction and size are critical to the successful rehabilitation of raptors.

Some construction factors to consider are discussed below.

Double doors

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3: Species Overview

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3

Species Overview

A short species summary is presented including the common name, scientific name, abbreviation, the normal weight range, the typical diet, and habitat, as well as reproductive details. The species are arranged by continent but it is very common for a species to be present in many parts of the world. These data were compiled from multiple sources listed below but many species are not well documented.

The weights are provided in as much detail as current research allows. Note that the weight ranges can vary significantly based on geographic location and latitude. Ranges are printed separately for each sex, if available, or combined if not.

In some cases, multiple sources are listed if a discrepancy existed in the published literature.

In rare cases, only a few individual weights are provided.

Africa 

Name

African barred owlet

(Glaucidium capense)

Abbrev.

Weight range

Diet

Habitat

Male: 83–132 g

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Appendix F: Body Weights during Development

Scott, D.E. CABI PDF

Hatch

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

3 months

UNK

25–30

60–70

100–110

110–120

130–140

140+

140+

140+

140+

Barn owl

15–20

25–30

90–100

250–300

450–500

550–600

650–700

600+

600+

500+

Red-shouldered hawk

30–40

30–40

80–90

175–275

350–450

400–600

450+

450+

450+

450+

Barred owl

525–575

550–600

575–650

600+

600+

600+

1500+

1500+

1500+

1500+

1500+

1300–1500 1600–1800 1900+

2000+

2100+

Eastern screech owl

30–40

100–150

250–300

400–450

Turkey vulture

UNK

100–150

300–400

750–850 1100–1200

Black vulture

75–85

100–200

275–375

600–800

950–1200

All data collected from the RaptorMedTM database at Carolina Raptor Center and compiled by Carly Smith.

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8: Anesthesia

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8

Anesthesia

Learning Objectives

1. Basic anesthetic protocols.

2. Proper oxygen flow rates and endotracheal tube

­placement.

3. Safe monitoring of vital signs.

Induction and maintenance of anesthesia in raptors is relatively easy but, as with all species, careful monitoring is always necessary. Gas anesthesia is usually the safest and most convenient method. A nonrebreathing system such as an Ayers T-piece configuration with a high flow rate (Fig. 8.1) should be used.

Isoflurane works very well, is safe, and has a fast duration of onset and recovery. Newer gases such as sevoflurane are also becoming popular and may be advantageous in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

Induction is carried out by masking the bird down with 3–4% isoflurane in oxygen at a flow rate of at least 1 liter/min/kg.

Pre-oxygenation and premedication/pre-­emptive analgesia with butorphanol are very useful and are highly recommended. Birds appear to have a predominance of kappa opioid receptors so

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