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6: Forensic Examination of Animal Hair

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

6 

Forensic Examination of Animal Hair

Claire Gwinnett*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University,

Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

6.1 Introduction�

6.2  Hair as Evidence�

6.3  The Use of Animal Hair in Criminal Casework�

6.4 �Recovery, Documentation, Packaging and Storage Methods for Animal Hair Evidence�

6.4.1  Recovery of questioned aka target animal hairs�

6.4.2  Recovery of control aka known hair samples�

6.4.3  Packaging and storage�

6.4.4  Documentation of evidence�

6.5  General Structure of Hair�

6.5.1  Types of hair�

6.6  Forensic Animal Hair Analysis�

6.6.1  Stages of hair analysis�

6.6.2  Microscopy preparation of animal hairs�

6.6.2.1  Creating a whole mount�

6.6.2.2 �Scale casts and impressions of the animal hair surface�

6.6.2.3  Medulla slides�

6.6.3  Microscopical analysis of animal hairs�

6.7  Species Identification from Animal Hair�

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13: The Human–Animal Interaction

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13 

The Human–Animal Interaction

Pippa Swan*

Clare Veterinary Group, Ballyclare, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK

13.1  Introduction�

13.2   A Historical Context�

13.3   Towards Enlightenment and Legislation�

13.4   The Status of Animals�

13.5   Moral Considerations�

13.6   Human Attitudes�

13.7   The Range of Relationships�

13.8   Positive Human–Animal Relationships�

13.9   Animal Cruelty�

13.10  Family Violence and the Link�

13.11  Hoarding and Bestiality�

13.12 Conclusion�

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13.1 Introduction

13.2  A Historical Context

That animals and humans always were, and will continue to be, intricately and inextricably linked is borne out by the arts, from caveman drawings through painting and literature to photography; and by science, from Darwin to current studies of animal biology and behaviour. The relationship includes dependence, respect and affection, as well as power, exploitation and abuse.

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5: Evidence Collection and Gathering:The Living Evidence

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5 

Evidence Collection and Gathering:

The Living Evidence

David Bailey*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University,

Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

5.1 Introduction�

5.2  Animals as Property�

5.3  Living Evidence�

5.4 Necessity�

5.4.1  What is the necessity for this suffering?�

5.5  What Is a Crime Scene?�

5.5.1  Arrival on scene�

5.6  The Five Cardinal Rules for Examining a Crime Scene�

5.7 PREGS�

5.7.1 Protect�

5.7.2  Recording the crime scene – measuring and sketching�

5.7.2.1 Photography�

5.7.2.2 Sketching�

5.7.2.3  Evidence logs�

5.7.3  Evaluate physical evidence possibilities�

5.7.4  Gathering of evidence�

5.7.4.1  Final survey�

5.7.5 Storage�

5.7.5.1  Dead animals�

‘The cat had fleas.’

Prosection Expert

‘Prove it.’

Defence Expert

5.1  Introduction

There are many texts and much guidance relating to the successful gathering of evidence

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2: Forensic Philosophy

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2 

Forensic Philosophy

Karl Harrison1* and David Bailey2*

Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, Defence Academy UK,

Shrivenham, Wiltshire,UK; 2Department of Forensic and Crime Science,

Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

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2.1 �One of Us Cannot Be Wrong: The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science by Karl Harrison�

2.1.1 Introduction�

2.1.2  Forensics: a plethora of different sciences�

2.1.3  The philosophy of science�

2.1.4 Conclusion�

2.2  Junk Science by David Bailey�

2.2.1 Pseudoscience�

2.2.2  Junk science�

2.2.3  conclusion bias�

2.1  One of Us Cannot Be Wrong:

The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science

Karl Harrison

2.1.1  Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is to consider how the science in forensics is structured.

Forensics is a crossroads discipline, which encompasses a breadth of skills, from investigative scene examination to analytical chemistry, but despite the vital importance of establishing conclusive facts in a court of law, little has been written about how forensics

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4: Forensic Science and Applications to One Health

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

4 

Forensic Science and Applications to One Health

Lloyd Reeve-Johnson1* and David Bailey2*

Institute of Health and BioMedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology,

Brisbane, Australia and Principal Research Fellow, Translational Research Institute,

Brisbane, Australia; 2Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire

University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

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4.1 Introduction�

4.2  The Need for Translational Research and One Health Collaborations�

4.3  Why Interest in One Health Now?�

4.4 �Macro-economic Issues of the 21st Century Where Animal Health-based

Innovation is Integral to Human Survival�

4.4.1  Food production and security�

4.4.2  Energy demands�

4.4.3 Poverty�

4.4.4  Zoonotic disease�

4.4.5  Environmental disaster relief�

4.4.5.1  Ethical use of animals�

4.4.6  Mental health�

4.4.7  Cloning, embryo research and genetic manipulation�

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