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12: Report Writing

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

12 

Report Writing

David Bailey*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire

University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

12.1   Definition of an Expert�

12.2   Requirements of an Expert Report�

12.2.1  Admissibility versus reliability�

12.3   Rules of Reliability�

12.4  Elucidation�

12.5   Obligations of an Expert�

12.6   Report Bias�

12.6.1  Resilience in a report�

12.7   Report Structure and Lucidity�

12.7.1  Confidentiality and records�

12.8   Accepting Instructions�

12.8.1 Assistance�

12.8.2  Relevant expertise�

12.8.3 Impartiality�

12.8.4  Evidentiary reliability�

12.9   Comparison of Jurisdictions (USA, UK and Australia)�

12.9.1  American views of admissibility and reliability�

12.9.2  The UK view�

12.9.3  The Australian view�

12.10 Conclusion�

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4: Forensic Science and Applications to One Health

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4 

Forensic Science and Applications to One Health

Lloyd Reeve-Johnson1* and David Bailey2*

Institute of Health and BioMedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology,

Brisbane, Australia and Principal Research Fellow, Translational Research Institute,

Brisbane, Australia; 2Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire

University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

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4.1 Introduction�

4.2  The Need for Translational Research and One Health Collaborations�

4.3  Why Interest in One Health Now?�

4.4 �Macro-economic Issues of the 21st Century Where Animal Health-based

Innovation is Integral to Human Survival�

4.4.1  Food production and security�

4.4.2  Energy demands�

4.4.3 Poverty�

4.4.4  Zoonotic disease�

4.4.5  Environmental disaster relief�

4.4.5.1  Ethical use of animals�

4.4.6  Mental health�

4.4.7  Cloning, embryo research and genetic manipulation�

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2: Forensic Philosophy

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2 

Forensic Philosophy

Karl Harrison1* and David Bailey2*

Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, Defence Academy UK,

Shrivenham, Wiltshire,UK; 2Department of Forensic and Crime Science,

Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

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2.1 �One of Us Cannot Be Wrong: The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science by Karl Harrison�

2.1.1 Introduction�

2.1.2  Forensics: a plethora of different sciences�

2.1.3  The philosophy of science�

2.1.4 Conclusion�

2.2  Junk Science by David Bailey�

2.2.1 Pseudoscience�

2.2.2  Junk science�

2.2.3  conclusion bias�

2.1  One of Us Cannot Be Wrong:

The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science

Karl Harrison

2.1.1  Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is to consider how the science in forensics is structured.

Forensics is a crossroads discipline, which encompasses a breadth of skills, from investigative scene examination to analytical chemistry, but despite the vital importance of establishing conclusive facts in a court of law, little has been written about how forensics

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3: Law and Animals

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3 

Law and Animals

Deborah Rook1* and Pippa Swan2*

Northumbria Law School, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK;

2

Clare Veterinary Group, Ballyclare, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK

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3.1 �Challenges to the Legal Status of Domestic and Captive Animals by Deborah Rook�

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3.1.1  The property status of domestic and captive animals�

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3.1.2  Pet custody cases�

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3.1.3  Direct legal challenges to the property status of animals�

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3.1.4 �The basis of a challenge to the legal status of animals – autonomy versus sentiency�27

3.1.5  Utilitarianism in practice�

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3.1.6  The concept of unnecessary suffering�

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3.1.6.1  Necessity as a balancing exercise�

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3.1.6.2  Property status and proportionality�

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3.1.7 Conclusion�

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3.2  Unnecessary Suffering by Pippa Swan�

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3.2.1 Introduction�

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3.2.2  A legal definition�

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1: Introduction – What is Veterinary Forensics?

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

1 

Introduction – What is Veterinary

Forensics?

David Bailey*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University,

Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

1.1 Introduction�

1.2  Current Projects�

1.2.1 Anti-terrorism�

1.2.2  Forensic analysis of hair�

1.2.3  Bitemark analysis�

1.2.4  Teaching and examining�

1.2.5  Contract research�

1.2.6  Expert witness appearance�

1.2.7  Toxicology and chemical analysis�

1.2.8  Veterinary call-out services�

1.2.9  Television and media�

1.2.10  Report writing�

1.2.11  Documentary evidence�

1.2.12  Blood pattern analysis�

1.2.13 Bestiality�

1.2.14 Ballistics�

1.2.15  DNA analysis and laboratory competence�

1.3  Conceptual Views�

1.3.1  Comparison to human forensics�

1.3.2  A definition of veterinary forensics�

1.3.3  Breadth of field�

1.3.4  Getting caught�

1.4  Biological Concepts�

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