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1: Introduction – What is Veterinary Forensics?

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

1 

Introduction – What is Veterinary

Forensics?

David Bailey*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University,

Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

1.1 Introduction�

1.2  Current Projects�

1.2.1 Anti-terrorism�

1.2.2  Forensic analysis of hair�

1.2.3  Bitemark analysis�

1.2.4  Teaching and examining�

1.2.5  Contract research�

1.2.6  Expert witness appearance�

1.2.7  Toxicology and chemical analysis�

1.2.8  Veterinary call-out services�

1.2.9  Television and media�

1.2.10  Report writing�

1.2.11  Documentary evidence�

1.2.12  Blood pattern analysis�

1.2.13 Bestiality�

1.2.14 Ballistics�

1.2.15  DNA analysis and laboratory competence�

1.3  Conceptual Views�

1.3.1  Comparison to human forensics�

1.3.2  A definition of veterinary forensics�

1.3.3  Breadth of field�

1.3.4  Getting caught�

1.4  Biological Concepts�

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6: Forensic Examination of Animal Hair

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

6 

Forensic Examination of Animal Hair

Claire Gwinnett*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University,

Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

6.1 Introduction�

6.2  Hair as Evidence�

6.3  The Use of Animal Hair in Criminal Casework�

6.4 �Recovery, Documentation, Packaging and Storage Methods for Animal Hair Evidence�

6.4.1  Recovery of questioned aka target animal hairs�

6.4.2  Recovery of control aka known hair samples�

6.4.3  Packaging and storage�

6.4.4  Documentation of evidence�

6.5  General Structure of Hair�

6.5.1  Types of hair�

6.6  Forensic Animal Hair Analysis�

6.6.1  Stages of hair analysis�

6.6.2  Microscopy preparation of animal hairs�

6.6.2.1  Creating a whole mount�

6.6.2.2 �Scale casts and impressions of the animal hair surface�

6.6.2.3  Medulla slides�

6.6.3  Microscopical analysis of animal hairs�

6.7  Species Identification from Animal Hair�

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11: Bitemark Analysis

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

11 

Bitemark Analysis

David Bailey,1 Jennifer Hamilton-Ible,2* Lucy Leicester,3

Louise MacLeod4 and Adele Wharton5

1

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire University, Stroke-on-Trent,

Staffordshire, UK; 2Highcroft Veterinary Group, Bristol, UK; 3School of Veterinary

­Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, UK; 4Hills

­Veterinary Surgery, ­London, UK; 5Saphinia Veterinary Forensics, Bottesford,

Nottinghamshire, UK

11.1  Introduction: Dog Bitemarks – Pathology and Outcomes�

11.2  Risks and Relative Incidence�

11.3 �Comparison between Human Bitemarks, Dog Bitemarks and Bitemarks from Other Species of Forensic Relevance�

11.4  Overview of Forensic Techniques and Methods Used�

11.5  Literature Review�

11.6  Strategies for Prevention and Risk Mitigation�

11.7 Conclusion�

11.1  Introduction: Dog Bitemarks –

Pathology and Outcomes

Dogs are often referred to as ‘man’s best friend’, but conflicts between the two species are common with potentially catastrophic consequences for both parties.

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12: Report Writing

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

12 

Report Writing

David Bailey*

Department of Forensic and Crime Science, Staffordshire

University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

12.1   Definition of an Expert�

12.2   Requirements of an Expert Report�

12.2.1  Admissibility versus reliability�

12.3   Rules of Reliability�

12.4  Elucidation�

12.5   Obligations of an Expert�

12.6   Report Bias�

12.6.1  Resilience in a report�

12.7   Report Structure and Lucidity�

12.7.1  Confidentiality and records�

12.8   Accepting Instructions�

12.8.1 Assistance�

12.8.2  Relevant expertise�

12.8.3 Impartiality�

12.8.4  Evidentiary reliability�

12.9   Comparison of Jurisdictions (USA, UK and Australia)�

12.9.1  American views of admissibility and reliability�

12.9.2  The UK view�

12.9.3  The Australian view�

12.10 Conclusion�

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2: Forensic Philosophy

Bailey, D. CABI PDF

2 

Forensic Philosophy

Karl Harrison1* and David Bailey2*

Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, Defence Academy UK,

Shrivenham, Wiltshire,UK; 2Department of Forensic and Crime Science,

Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK

1

2.1 �One of Us Cannot Be Wrong: The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science by Karl Harrison�

2.1.1 Introduction�

2.1.2  Forensics: a plethora of different sciences�

2.1.3  The philosophy of science�

2.1.4 Conclusion�

2.2  Junk Science by David Bailey�

2.2.1 Pseudoscience�

2.2.2  Junk science�

2.2.3  conclusion bias�

2.1  One of Us Cannot Be Wrong:

The Structure of Knowledge and Reasoning in Forensic Science

Karl Harrison

2.1.1  Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is to consider how the science in forensics is structured.

Forensics is a crossroads discipline, which encompasses a breadth of skills, from investigative scene examination to analytical chemistry, but despite the vital importance of establishing conclusive facts in a court of law, little has been written about how forensics

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