508 Slices
Medium 9781475816457

Faculty–Department-Chair Relationships: Examining the Nexus of Empowerment and Interpersonal Trust in Community Colleges in the Context of Change

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Melina J. Moye, Alan B. Henkin, and Deborah J. Floyd

Interpersonal communication in community colleges, like that in other social institutions, often depends on a degree of trust, given that initial moves are commonly made without complete knowledge of how the other will respond. Trust-based interactions constitute a critical synthetic force that affects the operations and levels of connectivity in these complex organizations (Lane & Bachmann, 1998; Nooteboom, 2002; Sztompka, 1999).

At the institutional level, trust is acknowledged as an essential component of well-functioning organizations and as a requisite foundation for constructive associations (Lane, 1998; Sztompka, 1999). In colleges and schools, trust is recognized as a key factor in organizational effectiveness (Carnoy & Hannaway, 1996; Coats, 2000; Cunningham & Gresso, 1993; Gmelch & Miskin, 1993; Gould & Caldwell, 1998; Hecht, Higgerson, Gmelch, & Tucker, 1999; Lucas, 2000; McArthur, 2002). Trust is, moreover, an essential mediating force in subsystems (here, departments) of educational organizations (Seagren, Creswell, & Wheeler, 1993).

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Medium 9781475816457

The Essence of Education in a Secular Islamic Land: One Is as Free as Is Responsible

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Kemal Duruhan and Süleyman Nihat Şad

To connect, even if in your mind’s eye, today and when everything about Islam started, this article follows a chronological order of the educational aspect of the Islamic lifestyle, ending up with the most recent happenings, such as global terrorism, September 11, Turkey’s participation in the European Union as an Islamic nation, so-called democratic maneuvers in the Middle East, and so forth. The article deals with and emphasizes education in Islam and, especially, humanistic tenets of Islamic education in Turkish history, starting from long before the foundation of the young Turkish Republic by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Because most of the divine religions promise to offer what we human beings seek to have in this world and the other, it is inevitable for them to soak into the thinnest nerve of an individual and the smallest cells of society. That is why all such religions imply some certain doctrines for the individual and the society. These, of course, include rights and obligations, dos and don’ts, all for structuring an orderly and comfortable life in this world, thereby pledging one a turnkey for the other world. With Christianity and the Jewish religion, Islam has been the leading divine religion, accepted and obeyed by millions over a large geography since its declaration in the early 7th century. This article sheds light on some milestones in Islamic civilization, such as the golden age, the Abbasids, the Ottomans, and the rise of Western civilization from the viewpoint of education. This makes for more than 14 centuries full of myths and truths, de factos and de jures, wars and peaces, policies and politics.

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Medium 9781475816068

RE:LEARNING: Exposing the Culture

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

JOSEPH L. FITZPATRICK

College of Education

University of Delaware

Newark, DE 19716

At RE: LEARNING’s beginnings in Delaware, the usual collection of optimists, idealists, and dreamers was there, but so were the somewhat cynical, who questioned the motives of the “pacers” proposing the reform. The cynical were and continue to be well placed — deeply and influentially entrenched throughout the state bureaucracy, in the business community, within the state P.T.A., in district offices, and in offices and classrooms of both RE:LEARNING and non-RE:LEARNING schools. RE:LEARNING would reveal the extent to which these two forces represent or dominate Delaware’s educational culture.

During the spring of 1988, early negotiations in Delaware accurately foreshadowed future struggles. Several of the prerequisites for membership in the national RE:LEARNING effort were relatively easy matters — an appropriation for the effort was secured, schools had been invited to participate, and the Governor, considerably influenced by his educational advisor, publicly endorsed the effort. The selection of a state coordinator and the establishment of a state cadre, an advisory group, remained.

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Medium 9781475816426

A Reformal Approach for Turkey: Emotional- and Social-Oriented Teacher Education

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Nilüfer Özabaci

Educational reforms and studies have focused on the school and ignored its relationships with the different dimensions of psychological, social, political, and economic life. Philosophers and scholars of education have reemphasized and debated the importance of the efforts of an educational reform (Turan, 2000). Discourses about teacher education have traditionally been regarded as national issues. National compulsory school and teacher education and training are usually interlinked. The purpose of schooling is not only to provide a nation with a qualified workforce but also to provide new generations with a cultural heritage and a language, strengthening their national identity. Increasing global competition intensifies the tension between the dual aims of education, which makes teacher education reforms ideologically and politically more important than before (Hargreaves, 1994). Popkewitz (1987) has underlined the importance of ideology and social formation in teacher education. The language, rituals, behaviors, and emotions are structured by cultural codes that govern the way people act and think toward schooling. The challenge comprises carrying out the responsibilities of a teacher, working as a part of a system of public education, and trying to do one’s best for the students.

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Medium 9781475816518

Attitudes of Turkish High School S̱tudents Toward Mathematics

International Journal of Educational Ref Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Kursat Yenilmez

The term attitude presents many definitions that complement one another. According to Thurstone (1928), attitude is the sum of inclinations and human feelings; prejudices and distortions; and preconceived notions, ideas, fears, and convictions regarding a certain matter. In this study, I consider the definition presented by Brito (1996), according to whom, attitude is defined as a personal inclination that is idiosyncratic and present in all individuals, directed to objects, events, and people, that takes on a different direction and intensity according to the experiences that each individual has had. Furthermore, it presents components from the affective, cognitive, and motor domain. Eagly and Chaiken (2005) define the concept of attitude as a psychological tendency that is expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor.

Attitude is so important that it can influence the mental and physical characteristics of a personality. A positive attitude is so strong that it can enhance the personal characteristics of a human being. A positive attitude may double the beauty of an already-beautiful person. A person who has a highly positive attitude can turn an insignificant event into one that others define as exciting. However, a negative attitude conceals and minimizes the positive characteristics that make a person look attractive.

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