250 Slices
Medium 9781442267688

Risk Management as a Strategic Driver for a Large Archive

AltaMira Press ePub

Anna E. Bülow

The National Archives, Collection Care Department, Ruskin Ave, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU, United Kingdom, phone: +44 20 8392 5330 ext 2364; fax: +44 20 8487 9201; email: anna.buelow@nationalarchives.gov.uk, www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/preservation/advice

Abstract    Archives are faced with fast-paced changes in the world in which they operate. In particular, innovation in digital technology have transformed the way people access and retrieve information. In view of this, The National Archives, UK has formulated a vision which aims to lead information management within government, and find new ways of preserving and making information accessible. In this climate, a preservation risk assessment was carried out in order to inform strategic planning as well as guarantee the survival of records. Results have highlighted the degree of environmental problems within the main site. In addition, it illustrated the amount of damage resulting from current policies and practices associated with storage, retrieval, and substitution copying; it also proved policies already in place to be highly effective. The results of the assessment have led to a number of improvements to the repository environment as well as policies on storage and retrieval.

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Medium 9781442267657

Visual Artists Rights Act: Analyzing the Moral Right of the Artist and the Public

AltaMira Press ePub

Analyzing the Moral Right of the Artist and the Public

Anna Heineman

309 ABW, 141 North Riverside Drive,150 Art Building West, Iowa City, IA 52242, anna-heineman@uiowa.edu

Abstract      Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc, a controversial piece of public art, was inconspicuously taken down by the United States General Services Admin istration. The Cor-ten steel arc was dismantled and placed in a storage warehouse in Brooklyn, New York. A year and a half later, the United States Congress passed the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA), protecting artists and their work from public destruction. Because an artist’s identity is associated with the work itself, the destruction or modification of work in public spaces is now protected by law. The question is posed, would Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc, have been protected if the controversy began after the enactment of the Visual Artists Rights Act? This paper will look at both sides of the enacted law, and whether the law is beneficial to public as well as the artist.

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Medium 9781442267589

DNA Preservation Research: The Downside and Upside of an Enigma

AltaMira Press ePub

Stephen L. Williams and Margaret E. Malone

Department of Museums Studies, Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798-7154 (e-mail:).

AbstractResearch leading to a better understanding of the deterioration and preservation processes of DNA could provide a favorable future for natural history collections by reducing unnecessary destructive sampling and by increasing collection use for modern molecular studies. More information is needed to assess the value of existing collections for DNA investigations. Equally important is the need to improve preservation strategies at multiple levels so that future specimens can better accommodate such investigations. On the downside, only a few researchers have touched upon these needs over the past two decades; on the upside, there are currently good opportunities for developing this type of research program. To demonstrate these opportunities, four areas of preservation research are proposed, followed with comments regarding resources.

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Medium 9781442267664

FOCUS: Public Art

AltaMira Press ePub

This issue is once again focused on public art—a topic whose relevancy is proved by the continuing public funding of major public art commissions. As noted in the Guest Editor’s foreword, another major project is opening in New York Harbor and its success with its various audiences will be followed by major art critics nationwide.

This issue presents a consideration of Chicago’s Millennium Park. Such all­encompassing public spaces incorporating art as well as featuring diverse cultural offerings is perhaps the way of the future. In the park, art is set within a landscape space that is appropriate for its appreciation and consideration. The museums of the past once were surrounded by grand parks. As an example, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural History are connected by Central Park. More recently, museums with a more narrow focus were placed in settings that were not park-like at all. Often, the settings were abrupt urban streetscapes. Yet in today’s world, museums, sculpture, and art centers openly compete with shopping centers for audiences, making creative leveraging a necessity to attract the optimum number of visitors.

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Medium 9781442267657

Forming an Urban Public Art Collection: A Case Study of the Fairmount Park Art Association

AltaMira Press ePub

A Case Study of the Fairmount Park Art Association

Laura S. Griffith

Assistant Director, Fairmount Park Art Association, 1616 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-5313, 19lgriffith@fpaa.org

Abstract      Chartered in 1872 as the nation’s first public art organization, the Fairmount Park Art Association can be used as a case study for how urban public art collections form and evolve over time. From acquisi tions, purchases and donations, to new commissions and involvement with monuments and memorials, the Art Association has helped build Philadelphia’s collection of cultural treasures. Programs such as Form and Function and New·Land·Marks have changed the approach to the commission process, resulting in artworks that are integrated with the site and connected to the community. Over the years the Art As sociation’s related public art activities have included planning projects, establishing an ongoing conservation maintenance program, advocacy, documentation, and interpretation. These efforts combined with those of other entities and individuals have established Philadelphia as a public art destination with the largest collection of outdoor sculpture in the United States—an attraction for tourists that contributes to the quality of life in the city.

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