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Chapter 1 Learning on Demand and Byod

Kipp D; Rogers Solution Tree Press ePub

The washing machine started the violent, shaking spin cycle again. This time it sounded as if it would explode. I thought, “I have to fix this thing now.” With wrench and level in hand, I went into the laundry room to try to level the washing machine. The bubble on the level quickly slid to the left as it was placed on the machine. I tilted the front up and carefully turned the screw supports to raise the left front slightly. The bubble in the glass tube slid quickly to the right of the level line. After about thirty minutes of doing the “washing machine tango,” my then fifteen-year-old came by and asked what I was doing. By then, I was sweating profusely and feeling frustrated to no end, but I unflappably shared that I was trying to level the washing machine but having no luck.

In a very matter-of-fact voice, my son said, “Why don’t you look it up on YouTube, Dad?” I responded, “Look what up?” He replied, “How to level a washing machine. I’ll look it up for you.” He pulled out his iPhone, went to YouTube, and pulled up a video on how to level a washing machine. I watched with my mouth open. The video was about three seconds shy of two minutes long. The smiling gentleman was dressed in coveralls and spoke with a slow, southern accent. He taught me that most washing machines are self-leveling in the rear and that with just a simple tilt towards the front, the washing machine should be level. To my surprise, I had the washing machine leveled in about five minutes. Had my son not had his phone, I wonder how long it would have taken me to fix it using my method.

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Chapter 4 Building A Culture of Teaching and Learning With Byod

Kipp D; Rogers Solution Tree Press ePub

I visited a teacher’s classroom where students were eagerly answering questions about the U.S. Great Depression using Poll Everywhere (www.polleverywhere.com). Students were discussing the questions in groups of two and three and then racing to input the correct answers on their devices. After only a couple of minutes, the teacher began a discussion on one of the questions. I asked myself, “How did this teacher get to the point where the students were comfortable using the technology in the classroom?” The lesson was not on the devices; the focus was clearly on the instruction that was taking place. The devices were just part of the learning process and the means to the end.

How is it that some schools are deemed more tech savvy than others? How do schools move toward becoming a tech-savvy school—a school that seamlessly integrates technology into instruction? It is obvious that much of the determination rests on the building principal’s work.

Although much of the school’s technology leadership rests with the principal, we must recognize that there are several other formal and informal leaders in schools who can help shape the technology identity: department chairs, team leaders, grade-level chairpersons, and other staff. Each leader plays an important role in shaping the path of other staff members when it comes to technology integration.

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Chapter 6 Monitoring and Evaluating The Culture of Byod in Schools

Kipp D; Rogers Solution Tree Press ePub

The expectations of how staff, students, and families use BYOD will continue to increase as you go through the initiative. Opportunities for using BYOD in imaginative ways will present themselves at unexpected times. Conversely, it is inevitable that the initiative will bring about consequences that were unintended.

Bring your own device will adjust the manner in which many things are done in your schools. It will provide opportunities to think of ways to complete activities and tasks more efficiently and effectively. For example, in YCSD, we are often asked to participate in research studies that have students, staff, and parents complete surveys. As an option for protecting instructional time, some of our schools used QR codes to provide links to the surveys, which make it easy for students to complete the survey at convenient times during the class period.

It is important for district planners and stakeholders to recognize that it is impossible to predict all outcomes. Information on BYOD use should be collected, discussed, and shared regularly by steering committees. Doing so helps build capacity and a culture of integrating BYOD that continues to grow.

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Chapter 2 Planning Byod in Eight Steps

Kipp D; Rogers Solution Tree Press ePub

I would spend hours using HyperStudio, a creativity software program, to create one science station activity in which small groups of students would spend approximately fifteen minutes at most on the activity. There were three computers in the back of my classroom when I taught eighth-grade science, and I wanted more. I would often design small-group activities and borrow three additional computers from a neighboring colleague who never used them. My students loved the lessons and activities. The time spent in class passed quickly, and students would often ask if they could do more computer-based activities.

At the time, I didn’t understand why my colleagues never embraced using computers to enhance what they were teaching. Later, I realized it was probably due to the lack of having a well-thought-out distribution plan that included professional development. Like many other teachers, we were given the three computers and told to go for it. It is interesting that years later I’ve seen the same thing happen with interactive whiteboards and iPad initiatives. Teachers are often provided with the latest and greatest technology tool without sufficient training to support using it in the classroom.

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Chapter 5 Enhancing Teaching, Learning, and Assessment With Byod

Kipp D; Rogers Solution Tree Press ePub

In earlier chapters, we discussed the fact that BYOD will inevitably change the manner in which students learn and the manner in which teachers teach. Allowing student-owned devices into schools will eventually bridge the gap between formal and informal learning. Additionally, BYOD is likely to shift the roles and relationships between teachers and students because of the access students have.

While I strongly believe that providing students with around-the-clock access is key to helping them obtain information when they need it most, we must be careful not to focus more on the devices than on the teaching and learning that the devices can support. For example, many school districts have spent millions of dollars on devices and infrastructure to support one-to-one computer initiatives. Education technology author and consultant Alan November (2012) refers to these initiatives as $1,000 pencil programs, or paper shoved down the wire, which means the devices alone will not improve student achievement. I agree. In order to lead to any significant level of academic improvement, a strong focus must be placed on clear curriculum goals, instructional pedagogy, and assessments that are aligned to the curriculum.

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