50 Slices
Medium 9780874251784

23 Individual Interim Course Review

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Individual Interim Course

23 Review

DESCRIPTION

SITUATIONS

OBJECTIVES

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

It is valuable during many events, if there is no regular review system (see At the End of the Day Reviews), to have a method of discovering participants’ attitudes about what is happening during the course. This is one of four simple activities that summarizes the basic approaches to “Interim Reviews,” which are course reviews held about halfway through the event so that there is time to take remedial action if necessary. (See also Activities 15, 29, and 32.)

This is useful at about the midway point in any training course where:

It is desirable to know how the training is being received.

There is the intention to make modifications or take remedial action, if this is necessary.

To give the participants the opportunity to review and reflect on the training and learning up to that stage

To give participants time and guidelines to consider their views about the course and learning process

To preface a discussion about the training process

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

31 Priorities

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

31 Priorities

DESCRIPTION

This activity is a mini-session describing a model for setting priorities that precede an activity intended to allow practice of the skills determined by the model.

SITUATIONS

The activity can be used during any training event requiring participant practice in establishing priorities, decision making, problem solving, etc., and in general as well as in specific time management situations.

OBJECTIVES

To provide a basis for the introduction of a model that describes establishing priorities

To provide practice in the use of the priority model in planning problem solving, decision making, and time management

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

METHOD

There are no particular trainer problems in conducting this activity, but it will help the process if the participants are advised before the event, preferably before they arrive at the training course, that during the course there will be discussion of the problems in assigning priorities to tasks, and they should identify a number of their job responsibilities they wish to have discussed.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

30 Pre-Introductions

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

30 Pre-Introductions

DESCRIPTION

Most training courses need to be started by the trainer introducing the course: its rationale, content, nature, and location. This activity can be used to replace a simple, straightforward statement by the trainer. At this stage of a course, the students are not very likely to retain much information given directly to them, particularly if this information is given in a didactic manner.

SITUATIONS

This activity can be used in virtually any course opening, although it is more likely to be of value in non-technical types of courses where the emphasis is more on human relations, and where the course content and method particularly have been described only minimally in the pre-course literature.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the activity, the participants will:

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

METHOD

Have obtained all the information about the course that they require

Have enjoyed obtaining this information

Retain the information longer than if received by direct means

None

1. Tell the participants that rather than try to give them course/hotel/personal information—some of which may not be of any interest or use to them—you are going to try another approach that they may find more effective.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

48 Trust Me

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

48 Trust Me

DESCRIPTION

This is a physical activity linked strongly to emotions in which each participant takes a walk with another participant and experiences events and feelings that can further develop feelings of trust in each other.

SITUATIONS

This activity is particularly useful in human relations events when it is helpful for participants to start to get to know each other at more than superficial levels. However, it is also valuable during other types of events to break a developing formal structure and lead the participants into a more experiential event.

OBJECTIVES

To enable the participants to increase their knowledge of each other

To develop feelings of trust between participants

To introduce a relaxed type of activity in an otherwise formal event

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

Very few problems arise with this activity either during the walk or in the subsequent discussion. Some trainers may be reluctant to introduce this type of activity that superficially appears to be a high risk one and that does not seem to fit into a structure.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

2 Activity Appraisal

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

2 Activity Appraisal

DESCRIPTION

Many of the activities in this collection end with the requirement for an appraisal of the task achievement, the relevant process, or the interpersonal relationships involved. There are, of course, many ways to conduct appraisals; this is one recommended approach that places most of the responsibility for the appraisal process in the hands of the participants themselves.

SITUATIONS

This activity, or a modified version of it, can be used after any activity that requires an assessment of how the task has been performed and that also requires the appraisal to be participant-centered.

OBJECTIVES

To assess performance in terms of task, process, attitude, and/or relationships

To enable the participants to take control of the appraisal rather than to rely on the trainer

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

In many cases, this approach to appraisal should be reserved for events taking place during a training session when the delegates are ready to take responsibility for activities themselves. However, I have successfully used this activity for appraisal after the first activity of a training event during the first afternoon, when it was desirable to encourage the participants to take early responsibility for their activities, for the way they learned, and to a large extent, for what they did and how they did it during the event.

See All Chapters

See All Slices