50 Slices
Medium 9780874251784

33 Progressive Introductions

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

33 Progressive Introductions

DESCRIPTION

This introductory activity extends the method described in Activity 27

(participants interview each other than introduce each other, thereby alleviating the stress of self-introduction) and utilizes progressively larger groups in the mutual introduction approach.

SITUATIONS

This is useful at the start of any course where the participants do not know each other, or know each other only minimally. Other approaches are possible when the course participants know each other well and are wellknown to the trainer, and more so when, although the participants are reasonably intimate, the trainer is the stranger. Additionally, this may be necessary to ease the transition when there may be difficulties in encouraging the participants to express themselves in a large group or when group interaction will be an essential part of the event.

OBJECTIVES

To encourage group development by starting the members talking within the group

To give each member some indication of the job, interests, etc., of the other members of the group

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

30 Pre-Introductions

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

30 Pre-Introductions

DESCRIPTION

Most training courses need to be started by the trainer introducing the course: its rationale, content, nature, and location. This activity can be used to replace a simple, straightforward statement by the trainer. At this stage of a course, the students are not very likely to retain much information given directly to them, particularly if this information is given in a didactic manner.

SITUATIONS

This activity can be used in virtually any course opening, although it is more likely to be of value in non-technical types of courses where the emphasis is more on human relations, and where the course content and method particularly have been described only minimally in the pre-course literature.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the activity, the participants will:

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

METHOD

Have obtained all the information about the course that they require

Have enjoyed obtaining this information

Retain the information longer than if received by direct means

None

1. Tell the participants that rather than try to give them course/hotel/personal information—some of which may not be of any interest or use to them—you are going to try another approach that they may find more effective.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

48 Trust Me

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

48 Trust Me

DESCRIPTION

This is a physical activity linked strongly to emotions in which each participant takes a walk with another participant and experiences events and feelings that can further develop feelings of trust in each other.

SITUATIONS

This activity is particularly useful in human relations events when it is helpful for participants to start to get to know each other at more than superficial levels. However, it is also valuable during other types of events to break a developing formal structure and lead the participants into a more experiential event.

OBJECTIVES

To enable the participants to increase their knowledge of each other

To develop feelings of trust between participants

To introduce a relaxed type of activity in an otherwise formal event

TRAINER

GUIDANCE

Very few problems arise with this activity either during the walk or in the subsequent discussion. Some trainers may be reluctant to introduce this type of activity that superficially appears to be a high risk one and that does not seem to fit into a structure.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

16 Group Role Analysis

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

16 Group Role Analysis

DESCRIPTION

The format of this activity is one of group role analysis and identification.

Through discussion, the strengths and weaknesses of the groups are revealed, and the opportunities available to them identified and linked to the existing and potential threats to their development.

SITUATIONS

This activity is one that is suitable (1) for a group or groups of individuals who are either part of an existing team, a developing team, or even an embryonic team, and (2) for a group at a course during which they go from being unfamiliar participants to a cohesive group or even a team. It is probably most appropriately considered as a bridging activity rather than an introductory activity, since more value appears to result when the people involved have started to settle down as a group rather than in the very early stages of group development when candidate statements are less likely to emerge.

OBJECTIVES

To identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of and to the individuals of the group and also the group itself

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874251784

37 Report Activity (1)

Lelslie Rae HRD Press, Inc. PDF

37 Report Activity (1)

DESCRIPTION

This is an activity requiring, at a minimum, two groups who have been involved together in a training event for at least one or two days in order for the maximum amount of interaction to take place. It requires the production, comparison, and scoring of a written report by each group.

SITUATIONS

The activity can be held at virtually any stage of a learning event, but it is most effective as described above, when the participants have been together for one or two days. It will be found to be at its most effective if a training group of 8 to 12 participants has been divided into two groups for part of the event and these participants have started to build up a group cohesiveness and loyalty.

OBJECTIVES

To enable a developing group to progress, but to discover the problems of over-cohesiveness and over-loyalty to the group

To enable participants to practice elements of planning from the viewpoints of both the group and the individual

To increase the interactive skills between groups of participants and individual participants in a meeting situation

See All Chapters

See All Slices