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43. Decisions, Decisions

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

43

Decisions, Decisions

Walt Hopkins, Castle Consultants 

Crook of Devon, Scotland 

Purpose 

To help a group examine the cross-cultural dimensions of decision making and prepare to work together by coming to agreement about how they will cooperate, given their differences

Target audience 

Any group of individuals or teams who must make decisions across cultural lines. Works best with groups of five to nine. If you have more than eight or nine in the total group, form multiple groups.

Time 

This can go as long as you like (30—120 minutes), depending on your time and skill in dealing with a group and the importance of the objectives and length of time that they will be working together.

Materials and environment 

• Flipcharts and markers for the number of groups you have

• Adequate room space for the groups to work separately

Procedure 

1. Assign groups if you need to have more than one.

2. Ask people in each group to stand at a flipchart. Tell them to begin this task: List all the ways that we as a group can make a decision.

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45. Six Key Aspects of International Business Contact

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

45

Six Key Aspects of

International Business Contact

Eric Lynn, LCT Consultants 

Nürnberg, Germany 

Purpose and learning objectives 

Listed below are six key aspects of this activity

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

trust commitment success working together decision-making time (punctuality, efficiency, getting down to business, etc.)

The way we as individuals and as cultures perceive these key aspects defines what we think is the “right” way to do things. Furthermore, it defines what we perceive as reality.

A team of six people from six countries creates six realities from the same situation. Because they have formed a “team,” they are in the process of creating a new reality. If they are not aware of this process, the potential for collapse is great. This activity develops the participants’ understanding of these different “realities,” enabling them to move away from thinking that there is a “right” or “wrong” way of doing things. It helps them create a process that incorporates everyone’s perspective concerning these six aspects.

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27. Global Management Skills

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Global Management Skills

27

Farid Elashmawi, Global Success 

San Jose, California, USA 

Purpose 

This activity will help participants assess their multicultural management skills with respect to several important global cultures and help participants recognize how values influence our communication across cultures. Specifically, participants will:

• test their “multicultural management” skills;

• see how their cultural assumptions can differ from those of others; and

• understand how they need to improve their knowledge about other cultures and skills

related to “multicultural management.”

Target audience 

This activity is designed for business executives and managers who deal with individuals from different cultures who are managers, negotiators, salespersons, trainers, etc. An audience of 20 or fewer is ideal.

Time 

30 minutes

Materials 

• Copies of Handout 1, “Test Your Global Multicultural Management Skills: Quiz Sheet”

for each participant

• Flipchart or chalkboard

Procedure 

1. Give each participant a copy of Handout 1, listing 20 global multicultural management true or false questions. Ask participants to answer the questions.

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3. Where in the world do you come from?

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Where in the world do you come from?

3

Walt Hopkins, Castle Consultants 

Crook of Devon, Scotland 

Purpose 

To involve people in the discussion of cultural origins and background in a low risk, engaging, and instructive way

Target audience 

This is a good opening exercise for a group starting a training program. It is useful for groups ranging in size from six people up to the capacity of the room.

Time 

20 minutes or more, depending on the size of the group and the number of questions to which you ask the group to respond

Materials and environment 

• A large world map, preferably the Peters Projection World Map (see the Resources

listing)

• Flipchart and markers

• A large open area

Procedure 

Put the map on the floor in the middle of the room. Ask the group to stand around it. (If using the Peters Map, give them some background about how it changes our perspective of the world. The materials that come with the Peters Map can help you with this.)

Ask people to use the map as a guide and place themselves in the room at the place where they were born. Invite them to observe where people are standing, introduce themselves, make remarks, and ask one another questions about their background. You can also do the exercise in several stages (ask them to move from where they were born to where they live now, to where they would like to live, etc.).

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47. Peer Supervision

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

47

Peer Supervision

Fredrik Fogelberg, Nomadic Life Management Consultants 

Voorschoten, The Netherlands 

Purpose and learning objectives 

Peer supervision builds on the philosophy that one’s own personal experiences are a very rich source of learning and that peers in a group can stimulate and help one another reflect on experience and enhance one another’s learning. The peer-supervision instrument can be used in a variety of contexts. It is a powerful tool to learn about cross-cultural communication and management. It can be used as part of a wider training effort, or on a stand-alone basis.

Specific purposes include

• learning by reflecting on day-to-day experience and

• transfer of knowledge from a training program back to the workplace.

Target audience 

For the method to work, the participants should

• have some experience in working or living in a cross-cultural or diverse environment;

• be willing to reflect on their own assumptions and behavior;

• establish a climate of openness and trust within the group;

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