50 Chapters
Medium 9780874256017

EQ #19 A Note of Thanks

Adele Lynn HRD Press, Inc. PDF

A Note of Thanks

Trainer’s/Coach’s Notes

Approximate

Time

2 minutes

1. Overview

Explain to the individual or group that habit is an important element that dictates how we are perceived by others. Explain that if we are in the habit of never saying good morning, we could be perceived as cold and unfriendly even if that isn’t the truth. Also, explain that habit in expressing or not expressing our positive feelings about others is no different. Even though we may greatly value our employees or co-workers, if we never express it, we could be perceived as not valuing them.

2.

1 minute

Purpose

“The purpose of this exercise is twofold:

3.

For those leaders who don’t normally think about the good things that people are doing in the workplace, this exercise forces that thought

For those leaders that think about the good things, but fail to acknowledge it, this exercise will encourage action and initiative.”

5 minutes

Give Directions

A. Give the participant(s) Exercise #19 and a package of 25 thank you notes.

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EQ #23 Action/Reaction

Adele Lynn HRD Press, Inc. PDF

EQ #23

Action/Reaction

EQ Target

Self-Awareness and Control

Empathy

Social Expertness

Personal Influence

Mastery of Vision

Objectives

• To help participants realize the impact of their actions with different employees

• To help participants recognize the need for assessing the emotional impact of their actions before taking actions

• To understand the role the leader has on creating an emotionally positive environment

Estimated Time

40 minutes

Materials

Emotional Intelligence Exercise #23

Uses

Training workshops on leadership

Private coaching sessions with all levels of leaders

Risk/Difficulty

Medium

Coaching Tips for the Coach/Trainer

Newton may not have had emotions in mind when he came up with his law of motion that states, “For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.” However, this often applies to human emotion. It is essential for every leader to be sensitive to and assess his or her actions as to the reaction that they may cause. And unfortunately, unlike the laws of nature, this assessment may have a different answer for each person involved.

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EQ #35 Advice from the Pros

Adele Lynn HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Advice from the Pros

Trainer’s/Coach’s Notes

Approximate

Time

1.

1 minute

Overview

Explain to the individual or group that they can draw on resources for advice. The great leaders who were used in

EQ 28 could be called upon at any time to give feedback to the participants if we just ask them for help.

2.

1 minute

Purpose

“The purpose of this exercise is to call upon a leader that we respect or admire greatly for their visionary ability. You are going to ask that leader to help you, to critique your actions, and to otherwise give you advice on how to drive your vision to be a reality with your employees.”

3.

15 minutes

Give Directions

A. Give the participant(s) Exercise #35.

B. Recall the great leader that you studied in EQ 28.

C. Instruct the participants to ask this great leader to critique and give advice to them about vision. Ask the great leader to tell the participant what they could do to strengthen their vision, to articulate it more clearly, to connect people with their vision, or to otherwise strengthen their position as a leader.

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EQ #37 Advice from Employees

Adele Lynn HRD Press, Inc. PDF

50 Activities for Developing Emotional Intelligence

The emotionally intelligent leader knows that his or her behaviors influence perceptions. These perceptions are critical to motivating employees toward the vision. However, most leaders don’t think about vision in terms of behavior so they may be unaware that certain behaviors can affect people’s commitment toward the vision.

The top ten vision killers identified by employees include the following:

1.

Treating people badly, such as, not showing people they care, forgetting to say thank you, not respecting people, not making people feel valued.

2.

Not setting good examples, living by the adage, ”Do as I say, not as I do.”

3.

Focusing on too many things at once.

4.

Pushing too hard on the task and forgetting the people.

5.

Not giving clear direction.

6.

Giving inconsistent direction.

7.

Not taking responsibility for failure.

8.

Focusing on the detail and forgetting to tell the “whys” or the big picture.

9.

Showing little or no personal commitment to the vision.

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EQ #15 A Grateful Heart

Adele Lynn HRD Press, Inc. PDF

50 Activities for Developing Emotional Intelligence

However, using positive energy requires many attributes on the part of the leader. The first of which demands that the leader be genuine about his or her positive feelings for the people in the workplace and their contributions.

If the leader isn’t genuine, more harm and damage can be done to try to express feelings that are not honest. The paradox lies in the fact that most leaders have been trained to think critically. Critical thinking allows leaders to make improvements to the status quo, to improve quality, and to otherwise drive for excellence. However, sometimes too much critical thinking has blocked our path to being grateful for the existing contributions, gifts, and skills that are present around us.

Therefore, the challenge for leaders is to maintain their critical thinking, yet balance it with genuine appreciation for what exists. This requires looking at things with a grateful heart and being able to see the good, not just what needs improving in our workplace and in our workforce.

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