151 Slices
Medium 9781599960722

Activity 8 Leadership Building Blocks

Peter Garber HRD Press PDF

Activity 8

Leadership Building Blocks

Purpose

To illustrate the importance of the sum total of all a leader’s life experiences to his or her leadership style and capabilities

Description

A model is presented that outlines the various influencers that ultimately determine a leader’s style and effectiveness.

Time

45 minutes

Resources

Handouts 8.1 and 8.2

Presentation

1. Begin the activity by explaining the following to participants:

Y

There are many variables and factors that ultimately determine the success of a leader. Many of these variables are determined or, at a minimum, are greatly influenced by what has previously occurred in the leader’s life that shaped and influenced who he or she is today.

Y

This activity explores these influences or leadership building blocks.

2. Distribute or display Handout 8.1.

3. Review each of these blocks, beginning with the bottom of the pyramid and moving to the top:

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Early Experiences

Character Builders

First Attempts

Finding a Formula for Success

Capitalizing on Success

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874259193

ACTIVITY 43: Ghosts of Collaborations Past

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

ACTIVITY 43:

Ghosts of Collaborations Past

Purpose

To illustrate how our past experiences influence our feelings and perceptions about collaboration

Description

Participants are asked to complete a brief questionnaire concerning their past collaborative experiences.

Time

45 minutes

Resources

Handout 43.1

Presentation

1. Introduce the activity by explaining that a person’s past collaborative experiences will influence his or her perceptions and receptivity concerning collaboration today:

However, these perceptions can be changed either positively or negatively.

People may be resistant to collaboration for reasons that really are not valid in today’s work environment based on these past experiences.

Helping people understand and address these perceptions and feelings can be important to the success of collaborative initiatives today.

When introducing collaboration in an organization, a good first step is to gain a better understanding of how people feel about collaboration going in.

2. Distribute a copy of Handout 43.1 to each participant and explain that the questions are designed to help them gain a better understanding of how they may presently feel about collaboration based on their past experiences.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781599961552

Activity 17. Communications Circles

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

50 Communications Activities, Icebreakers, and Exercises

4. The next level is information that an employee should know but doesn’t have to in order to perform the job. However, receiving this information can help an employee perform better, and they also appreciate being in the

“know” about this type of information. There is no guarantee that this level of communication is always achieved since employees don’t have to have this information to do their jobs.

This level of information may just help them perform their jobs.

5. The next circle is information that is simply nice to know. This communication could be on any subject and not necessarily directly or indirectly related to the job. This is simply telling people about things that may be of general interest to them but that they don’t really need to know. This information could be about organizational changes, personnel announcement, business updates, or anything that may be appropriate but not necessary to share with them.

6. There is another type of information not shown on this communications model. This is information that you can’t share. One of the most difficult communications challenges for a supervisor or manager is when employees ask about information that must remain confidential and that you consequently cannot share.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874259452

Strategy #5 Selling the “Sizzle”

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Strategy #5

Relationship

+

Selling the “Sizzle”

1. Know the

Customer

6. What’s in a Name?

11. Understand the

Customer’s

Needs

16. Creating

Buying Habits

21. Teamwork

2. Build

Rapport

7. Selling Up,

Down, All

Around

12. Empowering

Customers

17. Selling

Service

22. Adapting to Change

3. Honesty is the

Best Policy

8. Contingency

Selling

13. Cutting

Costs

18. Full-Service

Selling

23. Beating the

Competition

4. Understand the Customer’s

Perspective

9. Creating the Need

14. Just-in-Time

Opportunities

19. Global

Approach

24. Creative

Selling

15. Pull-Through

Sales

20. Value-Added

Sales

25. Worth the Price

5. Selling the

“Sizzle”

10. Having the Latest

Technology

Performance

+

Sales Strategy

Relationship—lowest

Performance—lowest

You might wonder why you would ever use a sales strategy that was low in both relationship and performance. After all—what’s left? However, there are times when this might be the most effective strategy to use.

Obviously, you wouldn’t use this strategy in a circumstance in which either relationship or performance would be a critical or determining factor for the customer. The type of situation in which you could use this strategy might be when these factors are less important to making the sale (for instance, when you might be selling the same or very similar product or service as your competition; thus performance would be the same for the customer regardless of who they buy from). The customer relationship factor could also be neutralized by lack of any real opportunity to add value to it. You might simply have no opportunity to do anything more than provide the product/service to the customer. In these circumstances, it might be the “sizzle” not the

See All Chapters
Medium 9780874259452

Strategy #20 Value-Added Sales

Peter Garber HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Strategy #20

Relationship

+

Value-Added Sales

1. Know the

Customer

6. What’s in a Name?

11. Understand the

Customer’s

Needs

16. Creating

Buying Habits

21. Teamwork

2. Build

Rapport

7. Selling Up,

Down, All

Around

12. Empowering

Customers

17. Selling

Service

22. Adapting to Change

3. Honesty is the

Best Policy

8. Contingency

Selling

13. Cutting

Costs

18. Full-Service

Selling

23. Beating the

Competition

4. Understand the Customer’s

Perspective

9. Creating the Need

14. Just-in-Time

Opportunities

19. Global

Approach

24. Creative

Selling

15. Pull-Through

Sales

20. Value-Added

Sales

25. Worth the Price

5. Selling the

“Sizzle”

10. Having the Latest

Technology

Performance

Sales Strategy

Relationship—lowest

Performance—higher

The term value-added speaks almost entirely about performance. Value in this case can supersede relationships. Even the strongest customer relationship can be replaced by a value-added sales strategy. Value is the bottomline to customers, and your ability to perform to meet this critical requirement can determine if you keep or gain their business or not.

See All Chapters

See All Slices