470 Chapters
Medium 9781475819281

Kaleidoscope Feature

R&L Education ePub

DEBORAH L. BLACKWELL

JANA S. PISANI

MICHAEL J. PISANI

ABSTRACT: In the year 2000, the Texas Education Agency and the Texas A&M University System teamed up to create an initiative called the University Faculty Fellows Program. Spearheaded by Texas A&M International University in Laredo, the program paired up faculty from the university with area Advanced Placement (AP) teachers in a variety of disciplines. Their goal was to help teachers prepare successful AP classes for their high school students, thereby boosting the number of students passing the AP examinations. This article focuses on the experience of three Faculty Fellows (the authors) who worked with U.S. history and economics teachers from the United and Laredo independent school districts. Using experience as their guide, the authors found the program to be highly viable with a great deal of promise but with room for improvement.

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Medium 9781475819472

Editorial: Scholarship as Pedagogy, Pedagogy as Reflexive Praxis

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

PATRICK M. JENLINK

Learning involves making oneself vulnerable and taking risks, and this is not how teachers often see their roles. . . . Teachers generally are accustomed to feeling efficacious—to knowing that they can affect students’ learning.

—Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (1999, p. 183)

A scholarship of teaching is not synonymous with excellent teaching. It requires a kind of “going meta” in which faculty frame and systematically investigate questions related to student learning . . . and to do so with an eye not only to improving their own classroom but to advancing practice beyond it.

—Hutchings and Schulman (1999, p. 13)

It is in our investigations, as academic scholars as well as practitioners, into the relational issue of the what of teaching and how it relates to learning as a teaching outcome that the enhancement of teaching and learning will take new and necessary direction. The nature of the relationship between teaching and learning is a point of nexus—not just student learning but teacher learning and not just teaching and learning in the academy but teaching and learning in all educational settings. And this investigation will require that we redefine the meaning of scholarship as it relates to both teaching and learning. We must examine the bridge between teacher understanding and student learning and at the same time take seriously Freire’s (1998) belief that there is no teaching without learning and no learning without teaching. Similarly, we must further examine the manifold nature of scholarship, which has a long history in the academy, and undertake the work necessary to moving beyond the academy. Writing in Scholarship Reconsidered, Boyer (1990) understood the importance of this when he stated “a new vision of scholarship is required, one dedicated not only to the renewal of the academy but, ultimately, to the renewal of society itself” (p. 81). The renewal of society depends on a common causeway that connects one generation to next: education. And education depends on a common relational action: teaching and learning. Therein lies the import of situating scholarship beyond the academy in other educational settings where teachers live and work, carrying out the daily rhythmic patterns in concert with students of teaching and learning.

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Medium 9781475819472

Reciprocity in Teaching and Learning: Bartering Time for Tasks

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

LORRAINE GILPIN

ABSTRACT: While there are obvious benefits of summer school for students and faculty alike, summer teaching/learning poses some unique challenges. Summer class meeting periods often have fewer contact hours but are longer and more frequent than sessions during the regular academic year. Thus, there are shorter periods between formative and summative assessments, and content is often condensed. Grounded in the scholarship of teaching and learning, this article discusses the process, products, and implications of a constructivist teaching activity in which summer class time was bartered for out-of-class application tasks. Results from 3 years of student data indicate that student learning is enhanced by the constructivist activities for which time was bartered.

While there are obvious benefits of summer school for students and faculty, summer teaching/learning poses some unique challenges and opportunities. Summer class meeting periods are often longer and more frequent than sessions during the regular academic year. The content is condensed, and there are shorter periods between formative and summative assessments. Grounded in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), this article discusses the process, products, and implications of a constructivist teaching activity in which summer class time was bartered for out-of-class application tasks.

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Medium 9781475819427

Reframing School–University Partnerships in an Era of Accountability

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

FRED L. HAMEL AND AMY E. RYKEN

ABSTRACT: In this article, we describe a school–university relationship that aims to sustain dialogue between educators who are positioned differently in relation to preservice teacher growth. We distinguish an intentional partnership model from other approaches to school–university collaboration, providing a rationale for our focus on dialogue and identity development. Using our experience, we examine discourse patterns at meetings and participant feedback to explore ways in which teacher identities are rehearsed and how identity positions are taken in relation to such issues as district-mandated curricula and state testing systems.

In this article, we document a school–university partnership effort derived within the current American context for teacher education, in which federal and state education policies have given school districts strong incentives for focusing teachers on prepackaged curricula designed to raise scores on standardized tests. In addition, these policies position university teacher education programs under increasing pressure to prepare teaching candidates who can successfully implement such mandated curricula. The purpose of our work is to define an emerging model of partnership that responds to the current policy context, to describe particular partnership practices, and to provide evidence of partnership outcomes.

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Medium 9781475832518

Prospective Middle School Teachers’ Generalizing Actions as They Reason About Algebraic and Geometric Representations of Even and Odd Numbers

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Prospective Middle School Teachers’ Generalizing Actions as They Reason About Algebraic and Geometric Representations of Even and Odd Numbers

Kadian M. Callahan

ABSTRACT: The abilities to reason about and generalize mathematical relationships and make sense of different mathematical representations are important facets of knowledge for proficiency in teaching middle school mathematics (e.g., Allen et al., 2008; Izsák & Sherin, 2003; Morris, 2007; National Research Council, 2001). Teacher preparation programs provide an avenue to develop these skills by engaging prospective teachers in reasoning, generalizing, and representational experiences as they study mathematics content (Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences, 2001, 2012). This study examined the actions of one group of prospective middle school teachers as they reasoned about algebraic generalizations and geometric representations of even and odd numbers in an undergraduate mathematics content course.

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