36 Slices
Medium 9781538104118

Journal Welcomes New Board Members!

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Journal Welcomes New Editorial Board Members!

If you enjoy the journal, thank an Editorial Board member. You see, members of the Editorial Board fulfill key roles in the success of Collections. Working closely with the Editor, the Editorial Board helps to achieve the journal’s mission and, moreover, contributes to the journal in a variety of ways.

Key roles of the Editorial Board include:

•reviewing or arranging for peer review of a reasonable number of manuscripts per year and

•serving as guest editor(s), when appropriate, based on specialized expertise.

In addition, the Editorial Board:

•encourages appropriate submissions from a range of museum and archive professionals;

•provides contributor contacts for the Editor to solicit manuscripts;

•identifies books, symposia, conferences, and projects for review;

•locates reviewers for books, symposia, events, and the like;

•assists the Editor in keeping abreast of trends and issues in the field;

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Medium 9781538101391

Engaging the Materiality of the Archive in the Digital Age

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Engaging the Materiality of the Archive in the Digital Age

Mark Tebeau

Associate Professor, School of History, Philosophy, & Religious Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, Mark.Tebeau@asu.edu

AbstractThis article asks how public audiences are negotiating the material world of archives and artifacts in the digital age. The digital age would seem to have diminished the physical experience of the archive and artifact, creating a world of pure information. However, the binary of virtual and physical obscures more than it explains. In recent years, digital tools have begun to reconnect public audiences to the physical world in sometimes surprising ways. This article draws examples from interpretive projects using mobile devices, crowdsourcing in museum environments, and explorations of digital audio to show how physical experiences of cities, museums, and sound have taken on greater interpretive weight and salience as a result of digital interventions. Finally, it considers the implications of such digital interventions for curatorial practice, asking how digital tools can accentuate the ways that history is both contained in and expressed through material archives and artifacts.

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Medium 9781538101391

A Digital Voice from the Dust: The Joseph Smith Papers at the Intersection of Public and Digital History

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

A Digital Voice from the Dust

The Joseph Smith Papers at the Intersection of Public and Digital History 1

Brent M. Rogers

Historian and Documentary Editor, The Joseph Smith Papers, brentrogers2121@gmail.com

AbstractLike other documentary editing projects, the Joseph Smith Papers—an effort to produce a comprehensive edition of the papers of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, more commonly known as Mormons—seeks to provide reliable access to “the authentic voice” of its eponymous historical figure in innovative ways. As a digital voice from the dust, the project makes Smith’s words, character, and context accessible in the online representation of his papers in ways that forcefully illustrate the convergence of public and digital history. This article uses the Joseph Smith Papers Project (JSPP) as a case study to look at documentary collections at the intersection of digital and public history while exploring issues of scholarship, access, and transparency. The trends described here promise to have implications for the larger fields of digitally presented public history and documentary collections.

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Medium 9781538104118

Exploring the Concept of a “Legacy” Collection: A Study on German World War I Paper Textiles at the National Museum of American History

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Exploring the Concept of a “Legacy” Collection

A Study on German World War I Paper Textiles at the National Museum of American History

Kathleen King

Assistant Registrar, The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, 701 21st NW, Washington, DC 20052; kking15@gwu.edu

Abstract  Using a collection of surplus German military objects composed of woven paper from World War I in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History as a case study, this article questions the value of keeping objects that no longer support the current mission statement of a museum, or if they ever did. It does not aim to answer definitively such a tough question, as a multitude of factors and stakeholders are involved with such a decision, but rather it seeks to bring this subject matter to the fore of collections and curatorial management, to explore best practices, and to examine if such best practices are being readily followed. The objects’ history, manufacturing processes, materiality, conservation concerns, and significance are explored in an effort to build context around the objects and to determine the appropriateness of their occupancy within the museum.

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Medium 9781442277229

Mutual Belonging as a Collecting Criterion: African American Art at the Muskegon Museum of Art

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Janet Stiles Tyson

Independent Art Historian, stiles.tyson@gmail.com

Abstract This article analyzes the development of a collection of African American art at the Muskegon Museum of Art in terms of a relationship of mutual belonging with the city’s African American public. When the museum opened as the Hackley Art Gallery in 1912, the city’s population was more than 99% European American. Lack of an African American public and lack of cultural discourse that encouraged representation of diversity meant that even the one significant African American artwork owned by the museum was not displayed as relevant to African Americans. Today, Muskegon’s population is approximately 58% European American, or white, and 32% African American. The museum now collects and displays African American art as relevant not only to African Americans but also to all of its public. But this shift in collection management occurred only after an important member of the African American community held the museum accountable to that community.

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