837 Slices
Medium 9781475816846

Did the Teachers Destroy the School? Public Entrepreneurship as Creation and Adaptation

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Robert Maranto

Did the Teachers Destroy the School? Public Entrepreneurship as Creation and Adaptation

ABSTRACT: This article is based on a case study to explore a model of teacher governance and illustrate the distinct challenges of entrepreneurship in public education. In the Sedona Charter School, each classroom principal educator serves as instructional leader and resource leader. Principal educators adjust curricula, hire their teachers, determine salaries (including their own), and purchase classroom materials within the constraints of state funding. By conventional measures of market, financial, and performance accountability, the school succeeds, suggesting that this model can be replicated. Yet the school founders severed their relationship with the school and lobbied state authorities to close it, since, in their view, it violated its charter (process accountability). This case suggests that most innovative entrepreneurs may have difficulty adjusting to educational realities and must themselves be held accountable by parents and state authorities. The study further suggests that, as educational principals, parents and state regulators are more influenced by performance and financial accountability than by process accountability.

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Medium 9781475811377

School Leadership Reforms: Filtering Social Justice Through Dominant Discourses

R&L Education ePub

CATHERINE MARSHALL
MARTHA MCCARTHY

ABSTRACT: Do administrative licensure policy reforms address social justice concerns? By analyzing the policy discourse (in interviews and documents) in Indiana and North Carolina, this article shows that policy actors believe the focus on heightened standards will raise the quality of leadership candidates. In turn, they believe that this focus on quality will address diversity, achievement gaps, and other equity issues. However, they are concerned about whether higher education can and will adequately implement the needed curricular practices. The complexities of administrator shortages, budget shortfalls, and high-stakes testing complicate implementation of reforms in leadership preparation. By focusing on social justice, this analysis reveals ways in which the two states’ policy actions have treated equity and social justice as components of quality.

Reforms designed to enhance the quality of public school leaders have received increasing attention across states. We investigated how state policymakers view their reasons for reforming and creating new standards for the preparation and licensure of educational administrators. We were interested in the values guiding the process and particularly in policymakers’ talk about how social justice issues fit into their views and their policies for improving administrator preparation and school leadership. To understand how equity concerns were managed in policymaking for administrator licensure and related reforms, we developed a critical policy analysis stance.

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Medium 9781475814460

Examining College Opportunity Structures for Students of Color at High-“Minority,” High-Poverty Secondary Schools in Texas

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Melissa A. Martinez

Anjalé D. Welton

Examining College Opportunity Structures for Students of Color at High-“Minority,” High-Poverty Secondary Schools in Texas

ABSTRACT: This study conducts an intersectional analysis of two adjoined qualitative studies, reanalyzing the data using a college opportunity framework (González, Stoner, & Jovel, 2003) to examine how sources of social capital available within three high-“minority,” high-poverty high schools in Texas shape college opportunities for Latina/o and Black high school students. Findings indicate that counselors and teachers were sources of college information and support while advanced courses prepared students for college-level curriculum. However, these same support mechanisms often deterred students’ access to quality academic preparation and college information. The increased focus on state-mandated accountability measures at the schools also limited students’ level of academic preparation and college access. Additionally, state college access policies designed to increase the college participation of underrepresented groups effectively accomplished this policy intent, but these same policies influenced students’ college choice decisions.

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Medium 9781475812008

Defining and Activating the Role of Department Chair as Instructional Leader

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP R&L Education ePub

CAROLYN KELLEY
JASON SALISBURY

ABSTRACT: With strong connection to schoolwide policy and vision and to the realities of the daily life of teachers and students, the department chair is uniquely positioned to play an important role in advancing instructional effectiveness (Printy, 2008; Weller, 2001). This article provides an in-depth look at the efforts of three urban comprehensive high schools to revision the role of department chair as instructional leader. The case studies identify building a shared vision, trust, role clarity, professional development, modeling, and application as critical elements of leadership development. The article defines the role of department chair as instructional leader and examines the effects of efforts to strengthen this role. Findings suggest that department chairs found their new role to be motivating and enriching, but significant training and reshaping of school norms were needed to provide the skills and legitimacy for them to lead instructional improvement in their departments.

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Medium 9781475811551

The Power of Critical Spirituality to Act and to Reform

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

MICHAEL E.DANTLEY

ABSTRACT: The field of educational leadership is currently in flux and transition. Scholars and practitioners are being compelled to engage concepts and frames of thinking that are substantively different from the traditional paradigm that has served as the foundation for educational leadership for some time. Included in this new way of perceiving educational leadership is critical spirituality. The inclusion of critical spirituality in the leadership conversation will help to provide a space for the engagement of other voices that have been somewhat dissonant to the traditional educational leadership discourse. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to delineate the four components of critical spirituality and propose how each can serve educational leaders to bring about radical democratic reform of schools.

Educational leadership has been historically grounded in a Newtonian, scientific management motif that celebrates predictability, empiricism, and positivist/rational ways of perceiving organizations. Maxcy (1995) argues that this scientific framework, labeled positivism, prefers what he calls “sanitized language and logical rigor,” which augments the traditional paradigm’s penchant for value-free interpretations of organizations and their purpose. The field of educational leadership however is currently in flux and transition. Scholars and practitioners are being compelled to engage concepts and frames of thinking such as chaos theory (Maxcy, 1995; Wheatley, 1999; Zohar, 1990, 1997); critical and critical-race theory (Carlson & Apple, 1998; Delgado, 1995; Freire, 1998, 2000; Giroux, 1996, 1997, 2001; Wing, 1997); feminist/womanist (Hill-Collins, 1998, 2000; hooks, 2000); and caring perspectives (Noddings, 1992; Valenzuela, 1999). Concomitantly, a spiritual grammar is being added to the educational leadership discourse. It is this spiritual verbiage that for many creates the most problems and apprehensions. That is because leadership has been defined in a context where those who hold positions of hierarchical authority are demanded to engage persons in the organization from a values-neutral, objective, and mechanical perspective. Leaders, according to this traditional model, become purposely truncated in demonstration of their complete selves in that only their intellectual identities are legitimated in the workspace. And yet it is the inclusion of the spiritual parlance into the leadership conversation that will help to provide a space for the engagement of other voices that have been somewhat dissonant to the traditional educational leadership discourse.

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