849 Chapters
Medium 9781475813371

Lessons Learned From Secondary Schools Using Technology for School Improvement

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Barbara B. Levin

Lynne Schrum

Lessons Learned From Secondary Schools Using Technology for School Improvement

It’s Just Not That Simple!

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to describe lessons learned from studying the leadership in eight award-winning secondary schools and districts that were recognized for successfully leveraging technology as part of their efforts for school improvement. Data were collected through observations, interviews, and document analysis in schools and districts with ethnically, linguistically, and socioeconomically diverse students in communities facing the types of challenges that many schools face today. Based on the cross-case analysis of eight intrinsic case studies, this article offers numerous examples and lessons learned about the role that leadership and vision, technology planning and support, professional development, curriculum and instructional practices, school culture, funding, and partnerships play in leveraging technology for school improvement.

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Medium 9781475820102

Looking Back and Pushing Forward to the Next 25 Years

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Gaëtane Jean-Marie—Editor, 2013–Present

Looking Back and Pushing Forward to the Next 25 Years

Over the past 25 years, the Journal of School Leadership (JSL) has published articles and special issues on educational policy and politics, organizational theory, school–community relations, school renewal and reform, localized and globalized leadership and learning, teacher leadership, university-based and alternative preparation programs, teacher and principal evaluation, diversity issues with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer), learning style, technology integration, and so on, which have informed cutting-edge contemporary work and future scholarship. Our authors include senior and emerging scholars, as well as practitioners with a broad range of expertise, to disentangle the challenges that districts and schools encounter in bringing about school and community reform and informing not only leadership preparation programs but also policies and practices. While the journal is committed to empirical research, authors accentuate the value of application to practice, address implication for policy, and identify new areas to build on for research. The broad issues covered in JSL are valuable resources for professors to use in their classes and for district and building-level leaders to use for professional development; such topics also introduce scholars and practitioners to nuanced ideas in the literature in an engaging manner.

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Medium 9781475811834

The Relationship Between Adequate Yearly Progress and the Quality of Professional Development

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Lori A. Wolff

Susan S. McClelland

Stephanie E. Stewart

The Relationship Between Adequate Yearly Progress and the Quality of Professional Development

ABSTRACT: Based on publicly available data, the study examined the relationship between adequate yearly progress status and teachers’ perceptions of the quality of their professional development. The sample included responses of 5,558 teachers who completed the questionnaire in the 2005–2006 school year. Results of the statistical analysis show a significant relationship between adequate yearly progress status and teachers’ agreement that professional development activities (1) advance teachers’ understanding of effective instructional strategies derived from scientifically based research; (2) forward teachers’ understanding of effective instructional strategies for improving student academic achievement; (3) are developed with extensive participation of teachers, administrators, and parents in the school of district; and (4) provide training to help teachers effectively use technology in the classroom to improve instruction and learning.

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Medium 9781475817492

Problem-Based Learning in Educational Administration: Enhancing Learning Transfer

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

PAULA A. CORDEIRO1

ABSTRACT: This paper presents a model for learning in an educational leadership preparation program. The model depicts various types of teaching and learning strategies that should be included in preparation programs in order for students to learn declarative, procedural, and contextual knowledge. Specifically, the paper describes four types of problem-based learning (PBL). Grounded in research on group problem solving, reflective thinking, problem complexity, and feedback and assessment, PBL has considerable potential to increase the transfer of learning. The paper maintains that real and simulated PBL afford students opportunities to learn all three types of knowledge. Two examples capturing the process of how PBL can be used are offered.

For forty years, researchers in educational administration have discussed the importance of problem solving in the preparation of educational leaders. In 1958, Hemphill argued that “leadership and group problem-solving are central concerns of administration” (p. 85). Ten years later in a paper presented at the seventeenth UCEA Career Development Seminar held in Portland, Oregon, Keith Goldhammer urged school administrators to become clinicians (i.e., to learn and practice their skills on real problems). He recommended that preparation programs afford future administrators opportunities to apply their individual experiences and knowledge to the identification of educational problems and the search for solutions to those problems. Goldhammer (1968) called for preparation programs to be constructed with the following components: “knowledge-building experiences, skill-building experiences, diagnostic experiences, experiences in the application of knowledge and data to concrete situations, experiences in the interpretation of knowledge and its ‘reduction’ for the specific application to discrete problems and communities” (p. 181). In treating their students as clinicians, Goldhammer suggested that administrator preparation programs focus on actual problems encountered in educational settings.

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Medium 9781475811957

The Reflective Teacher Leader: An Action Research Model

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP R&L Education ePub

LEENA FURTADO
DAWNETTE ANDERSON

ABSTRACT: This study presents four teacher reflections from action research projects ranging from kindergarten to adult school improvements. A teacher leadership matrix guided participants to connect teaching and learning theory to best practices by exploring uncharted territory within an iterative cycle of research and action. Teachers developed the philosophy of critical pedagogy through the reflective practice of journal writing and highlighting innovative teaching strategies. Finally, participants collaborated through peer dialogue and mentorship to accept change and ownership of the action process and student learning outcomes. Excerpts from participants’ reflective journals exemplify growth in teacher knowledge, confidence, personal empowerment, and enhanced professional leadership.

In recent years, there is an increased acceptance of teachers to function as leaders for school improvement at the instructional level of practice. Improvement at the instructional level requires leadership by teachers in the classrooms and with colleagues (Darling-Hammond, Bullmaster, & Cobb, 1995; York-Barr & Duke, 2004). This study is intended to illustrate the way in which action research can be utilized as an inquisitive, natural approach to instructional changes in the classroom. Additionally, the practice of reflection is illustrated as an innovative way to address student needs while enhancing teacher leadership and teacher learning (Dick, 2007; Hendricks, 2009). Reflections from four instructional interventions serve to describe the development and implementation of action research that includes systematic reflective journal entries chronicled throughout the process. The element of the participants’ continuous reflection enabled the researcher and a McNair scholar/researcher1 mentee to examine teacher growth and learning that took place personally and professionally. The teacher participants, their classrooms, and the mentor/instructor are all within a diverse urban educational setting.

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