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5 Action Planning and Introduction to Interventions

Gary McLean Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

102

OVERVIEW Based on the findings of the assessment, an action plan must be created. What goals and objectives will the organization establish, and what will the organization do as a result of the assessment and feedback? This chapter includes a form to assist practitioners in the process of doing action planning as a collaborative group, relying heavily on the use of the affinity diagram process described in the previous chapter. An overview of implementation options will be included in this chapter to suggest approaches that might be included in action plans.

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ith the assessment and feedback completed, and with the input of those receiving the feedback, the steering team can now begin the process of deciding what to do in response to the assessment. This step, the Action Planning phase, is shown in Figure 5.1.

A wide range of interventions is available to OD professionals. (An intervention is an activity designed to help achieve the goals and objectives established in the Action Planning phase.) What follows in this chapter is, first, a discussion of a process for separating training needs from other types of OD needs. This will be followed by a description of one approach to creating an action plan, followed by a brief overview of the range of implementation interventions available.

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Medium 9781576753132

3 Start-up and Systems Theory

Gary McLean Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

60

OVERVIEW What are the first steps that an OD professional carries out in entering an organization or a subpart of an organization? A critical component is setting project management in place. Establishing partnerships within the organization is also critical to the ultimate success of the project. How this is done, and with whom, will be explored in this chapter. Determining when it is time to move on to the next phase will be discussed as well. The entire OD process must be set in the context of systems thinking. A brief overview of systems theory is also presented in this chapter.

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ou have been successful in connecting with a client, and you now have a contract in hand. What happens next? The Start-up phase is important in establishing an infrastructure, including project management, that will support the work being done in the organization or subpart of the organization, though in some cases parts of this stage might have been addressed in the contracting component of the Entry phase, illustrating that there is not a clear distinction between phases of the

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13 Adoption of Changes and Follow-up

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322

OVERVIEW Adoption of change is a controversial phase in today’s dynamic and rapidly changing world. Some argue that change is so rapid that an organization cannot afford to adopt or institutionalize a change but must be in the process of constant change. Opponents of this theory argue that the culture has not changed until there is evidence that the change has been adopted or institutionalized. Reconciling these two perspectives will be the goal of this chapter.

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hrough the Implementation and Evaluation phases, we have discovered that the change that was proposed in the Action Plan was successful in the pilot or initial application of the change. From this success, the organization has now decided to adopt the change throughout the organization.

As we see from the ODP model in Figure 13.1, once the Adoption phase has occurred, we return to the beginning of the cycle or move to the Separation phase. With a commitment to continuous improvement, the cycle begins again, exploring the newly created culture and its processes to determine how they, too, can be improved, with the possibility that an even better adaptation to the organizational culture can be found. In this process, the newly implemented and adopted cultural component may need to be replaced, with a new adoption following another pilot implementation. Let’s consider the Adoption phase—and the change it entails—in more detail.

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9 Implementation: Global Level

Gary McLean Berrett-Koehler Publishers PDF

198

OVERVIEW This chapter explores the meaning of culture in a country context, describes the difficulties of changing organizational culture in the midst of varying country cultures, and suggests implications for OD practice in organizations consisting of varying country cultures and subcultures. In addition to considering specific OD-related issues, it also discusses common theories of culture applicable across disciplines, explores the emotional issue of globalization, and provides a self-assessment instrument for discussion purposes.

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f all of the issues confronting the OD field, perhaps one of the most difficult yet most important is the issue of doing OD work across national cultures and borders. We live in a world that is becoming increasingly small, given advances in technology—computers

(including e-mail and the Internet), satellite and cable television, and cell phones, all of which enable us to be in touch instantly and always with any part of the world (almost). With few exceptions, all business organizations are impacted by the growing global economy: investment capital flows across the world; currency is exchanged as a commodity; purchases are made from around the globe, frequently from low-wage countries; workers are hired from across the globe (often not even requiring them to relocate); raw materials come from around the globe; the food we eat and the clothes we wear come from a myriad of countries; work is outsourced so that customer service problems in the U.K., for instance, are being addressed by workers in India; and so forth.

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