85 Slices
Medium 9781601323279

Session - Biometrics and Forensics I + Cryptographic Technologies

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF
Medium 9781601323279

Exploring Digital Forensics Tools in Backtrack 5.0 r3

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'14 |

351

Exploring Digital Forensics Tools in Backtrack 5.0 r3

Ahmad ghafarian1 and Syed Amin Hosseini Seno2

Department of Computer Science, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA USA

2

Computer Networks Laboratory, Department of Computer Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran

1

Abstract - Computer forensics tools are essential part of any computer forensics investigation. The tools can be classified in various ways including, open source vs. proprietary; hardware vs. software; special purpose vs. general purpose, etc. In practice, software tools are more common. Each software tool has its own pros and cons. However, they all have one feature in common, i.e. installation, configuration, and setup. For some tools, the configuration process can be complicated and time consuming. To avoid this, the computer forensics investigators have the option of using the computer forensics tools that are pre installed and configured in

Backtrack 5.0 r3. In this paper, we present the results of our experiment with various digital forensics tools that are included in Backtrack 5.0 r3.

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Medium 9781601323279

Potential Vulnerabilities of the NextGen Air Traffic Control System

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF

220

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'14 |

Potential Vulnerabilities of the NextGen Air Traffic Control System

C. Giannatto1 and G. Markowsky1

1 School of Computing & Information Science, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA

Abstract— The FAA is well on its way to replacing the current air traffic control surveillance system with a new system known as Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast

(ADS-B). As with many projects, the focus is on performance and getting the system operational, with security having secondary importance. This paper describes some of the vulnerabilities of the current proposed implementation of

ADS-B and offers some suggestions on mitigating these vulnerabilities.

Keywords: ADS-B, ATC, Air Traffic Control, Vulnerabilities,

Safety, Air Travel

1. Introduction

By the late 1930s commercial air travel was starting to become a popular mode of transportation and the volume of air traffic increased dramatically. As it became more difficult to keep track of the increasing number of aircraft in operation, the airlines developed a system of radio stations to help monitor their en route air traffic. These initial radio stations were located in Chicago, Newark and Cleveland and were the precursor to our current air traffic control system.

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Medium 9781601323279

A Comparative Evaluation of Intrusion-Alert Prediction Techniques

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'14 |

117

A Comparative Evaluation of Intrusion-Alert

Prediction Techniques

Kian-Moh Terence Tan, Neil C. Rowe, Christian J. Darken, and Farn-Wei J. Khong

DSO National Laboratories, Singapore, tkianmoh@dso.org.sg

U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, 1411 Cunningham Road, Monterey, CA 93943, United States, ncrowe@nps.edu (contact author)

U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, United States, cjdarken@nps.edu

Defence Science and Technology Agency, Singapore, kfarnwei@dsta.gov.sg

Track: Network Security

Abstract—Recognition of patterns of intrusion alerts can permit prediction of future alerts and thus earlier countermeasures. Previous work has focused on building attack models to enable prediction, but this approach cannot handle novel attacks. We tested six methods of predicting novel alerts in what appears to be the first systematic comparison of their relative merits. The techniques were evaluated on real non-simulated attacks, both deliberately staged ones and those recorded by a honeypot. The best performance was achieved by an approach which exploits partial structural matching between time-grouped sets of alerts and finds analogies in them. This approach is slow in its basic form, but we found several methods to improve its speed.

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Medium 9781601323279

Teaching Cybersecurity to Wide Audiences with Table-Top Games

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'14 |

415

Teaching Cybersecurity to Wide Audiences with Table-Top Games

Tadhg Fendt

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Lewis & Clark College tfendt@lclark.edu

Jens Mache

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Lewis & Clark College jmache@lclark.edu

Abstract

Cybersecurity is a field of growing importance.

A particular challenge is that there is an evergrowing base of technology that needs securing, coupled with a shortage of security specialists.

This creates an important role for security education. Security education is considered difficult, especially with non-technical students, because the field is so broad. Table-top gaming has been suggested as an educational starting point to make a wide audience aware of the issues and to foster curiosity and enthusiasm for the field. In this paper we examine two such games, Control-Alt Hack and [d0x3d!], compare their strengths and weaknesses and feasibility in the undergraduate classroom. In conclusion,

[d0x3d!] seems preferable for use in the classroom.

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