86 Slices
Medium 9781601323170

An Evolving Educational Advisory Role for Computer Science

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

297

An Evolving Educational Advisory

Role for Computer Science

Andrew J. McAllister, Genevieve Audet-Perron, Amanda Gilks,

Debbie McAnany, and Rick Wightman

Faculty of Computer Science, University of New Brunswick

P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, E3B 5A3

Abstract – Recent movements like Code.org seek to have every school-aged child taught the rudiments of computer programming. The goals of such initiatives are to recognize

Information Technology (IT) skills as a foundational science in the new digital age, and to remove barriers for entry of young people into IT professions. While these goals are important, such change brings with it new needs for collaboration between post-secondary Computer Science educators and other stakeholders, which include teachers, government departments, post-secondary departments of

Education, and industry associations. This paper provides lessons learned from experience with a variety of such interactions by members of the University of New

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Medium 9781601323170

Running an Agile Class

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

436

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

R unning an Agile Class

Kevin A. Gary

Arizona State University

7171 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall

Mesa, AZ 85212 kgary@asu.edu

Abstract

Agile methods, particularly Scrum, apply an empirical process model to the complexity of software development. The reasoning, in short, is that a highly iterative process with specific short-term goals can be instrumented to provide constant feedback to change and disruption.

Agile methods focus on short iterations, adaptive work assignments, constant feedback, and process visibility to address the fundamental nature of complexity. The author is currently experimenting with agility in the classroom through the incorporation of these mechanisms and the support of online tools. Online tools can help in several ways, such as helping the instructor and teaching assistants scale up the agile teaching process. Initially we have found that the most impactful of online tools is a scrum taskboard, or Scrumboard, to make the work of the class visible to all stakeholders. In the context of the technology-supported classroom, the online

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Medium 9781601323170

Collaborative Research Project for CS and Engineering Students

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

477

Collaborative Research Project for CS and Engineering Students

Subodh Bhandari, Fang Tang, Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu, Scott Boskovich and Kevin La

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Pomona, CA, 91768

Email: {sbhandari|ftang|zaliyazici|sboskovich|kyla}@csupomona.edu

Abstract— This poster paper describes a multi-disciplinary and multi-year research project that involves students from

Computer Science (CS), Aerospace Engineering (ARO), Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Mechanical Engineering (ME). They work as a team on solving the research problem of collaboration between Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

(UAVs) and Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). 1

I. T HE P ROJECT

The problem that we are interested in is the collaboration between UAVs and UGVs to accomplish search and rescue tasks. Figure 1 describes one of the task scenario, where one UAV is flying in patterns to search a particular area for a potential object of interest. Once the geo-location of the target is found, it is transmitted over the network to the other two UAVs, which will fly near the target and drop water bottles to that location for rescue purposes. To make sure that multiple UAVs can fly at the same time, UAVS are programmed with the collision avoidance capabilities.

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The Changing Nature of Teaching and Learning Shaped by Information and Communications Technology

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

375

The Changing Nature of Teaching and Learning Shaped by Information and Communications Technology

G. Dzawo¹, M. Mbodila², and M. Kikunga ¹

Computer Science & Information Systems, University of Venda, South Africa.

2

Computer Science Foundation Unit, University of Venda, South Africa.

1

Abstract – Information and Communications Technology

(ICT) has changed the face of higher education and the nature of learning. In the 21st century, education systems have witnessed the rapid growth of information available making it imperative that students are equipped with the right skills to make choices on relevant information. Most governments today aim to offer the most comprehensive and effective education possible for their citizens within the constraints of existing funding and limited resources by increasing access to higher education. This has brought about some teaching and learning challenges some of which can be redressed by integrating ICT in the learning processes. Learning with ICT can potentially develop transferable and lifelong skills. In this paper, we highlight teaching and learning challenges faced by most higher education students in South Africa and then propose a conceptual framework for integrating ICT in teaching and learning underpinned by the constructivist theory of learning.

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Medium 9781601323170

Attachment-Theory Based Pedagogy

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

346

Int'l Conf. Frontiers in Education: CS and CE | FECS'14 |

Attachment-Theory Based Pedagogy

Karina Assiter

Department of Computer Science and Networking

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Boston, MA

Abstract

There are a plethora of formal methods for educating undergraduate students, including recommendations for classroom management, concept presentation and assignment creation. What is often overlooked is the influence that student-instructor attachment might have on performance. On the primary and secondary levels there is evidence to support what we would assume to be true; that attachment does effect performance. We then assume that, to some degree, these findings would carry over to collegebased instruction. Instructors have their preferred teaching styles (based on their personality types and learning styles), but regardless of the variations that exist and how well they correspond to student preferences, what is essential to learning is student motivation. Motivation could be influenced by a combination of factors, including inherent interest, career objectives, external pressures (i.e., parental expectation), and appropriate (based on skill level) complexity of assignments.

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