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5 Growth and Transition: 1990-2000

Christie, John Down East Books ePub

The bankruptcy during the preceding decade caused ripples that brought real estate activity in the early 1990s to a virtual standstill, as potential property owners waited to see what the future might hold. The Corporation routinely reorganized its financial and equity structure with the assistance of various interested individuals, and even faced the prospect in the early part of the decade of another bankruptcy filing. It wasn’t until 1993 that the situation would begin to stabilize with the sale of some assets and the infusion of new capital.

Finances aside, Sugarloaf continued to be the destination of choice for a faithful cadre of recreational skiers, and a preferred competition site for the racing community. In 1993 the Sugarloaf Competition Department was formed, assuming what had historically been the responsibility of the Sugarloaf Mountain Ski Club. It would function as a department of the Mountain, to be assisted by the Ski Club and Carrabassett Valley Academy. This level of organization, and the Mountain’s reputation as a premier competition venue, resulted in a nearly mind-boggling succession of races held during the 1990s : U.S. Snowboard Championships, U.S. Chevy Trucks Alpine National Championships, U.S. Snowboard Grand Prix, U.S. Chevy Trucks Freestyle National Championships, U.S. Masters Alpine Championships, North American Junior Alpine Championships, and the Eastern Junior Olympics.

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Appendix B: Sugarloafers in the Maine Ski Hall of Fame

Christie, John Down East Books ePub

Karl Anderson

“Bunny” Bass

Dick Bell

Fletcher Brown

John Christie

Irv Kagan

Jean Luce

Jack Lufkin

Wes Marco

“Pat” Murphy

Roger Page

Tom Reynolds

“Stub” Taylor

Peter Webber

Amos G. Winter Jr.

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Appendix D: Sugarloaf Mountain Ski-Club Presidents

Christie, John Down East Books ePub

Horace Chapman (1950-52)

Robert Bass (1952-54)

Scott Scully (1954-56)

Bill Kierstead (1956-57)

Jay Winter (1957-58)

Harvey Boynton (1958-59)

Leo Tague (1959-61)

Burt Covert (1961-62)

Don Pfeifle (1962-64)

Charlie Clark (1964-65)

John Christie (1965-66)

Norton Luce (1966-68)

Skip Skaling (1968-70)

Peter Spalding (1970-72)

Jack Smart (1972-73)

Bernie Carpenter (1973-75)

Bob Waddle (1975-77)

Charlie Murray (1977-79)

Frank Woodard (1979-80)

Pat Andrews (1980-82)

Tina Hinckley (1982-83)

Jon Hellstedt (1983-90)

John Lacasse (1990-93)

Marvin Collins (1993-95)

Greg Foster (1995-99)

Sue Manter (1999-2001)

Charlotte Zahn (2001-03)

Lev Steeves (2003-04)

Bruce Miles (2004- )

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4 The Best of Times …The Worst of Times: 1980-1990

Christie, John Down East Books ePub

Let’s begin our story about the decade of the 1980s at Sugarloaf by explaining why it should be called “the best of times …the worst of times.” On the positive side, the decade saw the realization of two important dreams, both of which are key to the current prominence of Sugarloaf. First, the vision and foresight of Peter Webber, not to mention his personal affection for the game, resulted in the construction of what is now regarded as one of the country’s premier resort golf courses.And, second, his name is also linked inextricably with the other important development of the decade: the founding and early growth of a private college preparatory school to be called Carrabassett Valley Academy.It was clearly the best of times.

Odlin Thompson, Amos, and Stub remember tbe old days.

But up on the Mountain, despite major improvements in the uphill facilities, and seemingly rampant real estate development, dark clouds loomed over an increasingly dire financial situation. This was brought on by the combination of cost overruns in infrastructure development, and highly leveraged and expensive debt. The situation was exacerbated by discouraging results from skiing operations due to inadequate snowfall and insufficient snowmaking capacity, worsened further by customers who resisted the rising prices put in place to help support the balance sheet. Some (myself among them) would argue that a contributing factor was a major change in management focus—from ski operations to real estate and other ancillary activities—which deviated from the resort’s original raison d’être.

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2 Becoming Sugarloaf/USA: 1961-1971

Christie, John Down East Books ePub

In April 1961, after returning to the United States from a postgraduate stint studying literature at the University of Stockholm, in Sweden, I went to Sugarloaf to race in the Schuss and to get in some spring skiing. It was apparent there was going to be plenty of it, as more than 200 inches of snow would fall on the Mountain that season. All the trails were open and well covered, and there was every indication that the area would likely stay open well into May.

My old Bowdoin buddy, Bruce Chalmers, and several other friends and I were staying as Dick Bell’s guests in his old Bigelow Station at the end of the access road on the weekend of the Schuss. Come Sunday afternoon, my friends were getting ready to leave, and we had to move out of the Station. I didn’t want to leave, but I had a problem: I had no place to stay, and all the money I had in the world was the five dollars that Bruce had generously given to me. Fate intervened in the person of Wayne Wibby from Bangor, now a successfully retired oral surgeon.

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