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Chapter Thirteen: Early Prevention in Day-Care Centres with Children at Risk—The EVA Research Project

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Verena Neubert, Katrin Luise Laezer, Lorena Hartmann, Tamara Fischmann, and Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber

Contextual framework of the EVA project

Research on early intervention and prevention with so-called “children at risk” is the major aim of the IDeA Center (Individual Development and Adaptive Education of Children at Risk). IDeA is a research cooperation of the Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, the German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF) and Sigmund-Freud-Institut (SFI). The centre is an interdisciplinary research centre financed by the LOEWE initiative (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung Wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz), a huge promotional programme fostering excellent research in the federal state Hessen. About 150 scientists are engaged in thirty-four research projects from seven different disciplines dealing with social and neurocognitive risks in the development of children.1

The EVA project (Evaluation of two different prevention programmes with children of a high risk population) is one of the larger projects concentrating on the evaluation of two different early prevention programmes in day-care centres with children coming from deprived neighbourhoods in Frankfurt am Main. The aim of this article is to give a short introduction on research on early prevention done at the Sigmund-Freud-Institut. At first a short overview on the design, methods and results of the Frankfurt Prevention Study (FP) is given. Subsequently the continuation study of the FP, the EVA study, will be introduced. The chapter is ending with the first results of EVA and a perspective on ongoing research on risk factors and early prevention at the Sigmund-Freud-Institut.

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CHAPTER SIX The triadic perspective for parenting and early child development: from research to prevention and therapy

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CHAPTER SIX

The triadic perspective for parenting and early child development: from research to prevention and therapy

Kai von Klitzing

A

triadic perspective in the context of parenthood takes into account the capacity for triadic relationships, or what we have called “triadic capacity” in mothers and fathers. It involves the capacity of each parent to develop an intense relationship with her or his child (whether in internal representations or in reality) without excluding either themselves or their partners from the relationship with the infant. Such a capacity also means that the intimate relationship between the parents can develop further, even when the child is integrated as a third member of the family. A mother with high triadic capacity is able to recognise that the father also has an important relationship to the child, without being overwhelmed by her fear of being excluded. A father with high triadic capacity recognises the mother’s significance, without excluding himself from the relationship between mother and child. As the child grows older, triadic capacity also indicates the ability of parents to accept that the child enters into meaningful relationships with significant others.

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CHAPTER TWELVE History and concept development of psychoanalytically based prevention projects in preschool institutions of the city of Frankfurt: conducted by the Sigmund-Freud-Institut and the Institute for Psychoanalytic Child and Adolescent Psychother

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CHAPTER TWELVE

History and concept development of psychoanalytically based prevention projects in preschool institutions of the city of Frankfurt: conducted by the Sigmund-Freud-Institut and the

Institute for Psychoanalytic Child and

Adolescent Psychotherapy

Angelika Wolff

I

n this chapter I want to give a report on the prevention projects in preschool institutions of the city of Frankfurt/Main that we—the

Sigmund-Freud Institut and the Anna-Freud-Institut1—over a period of almost ten years have jointly conducted since 2003. More exactly, I will speak from the child analytic perspective and with this restriction—will mention the history of the projects, the ideas behind the fundamental positions and goals, the development of analytically based concepts and thereby also the upcoming questions and problems that we have to deal with during the implementation of the projects.

(A comprehensive report by Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber et al. was published in October 2011 in Psyche under the title “Early prevention of psychosocial disturbances in children at risk”. The scientific part of the projects are presented in the chapters by Leuzinger-Bohleber; Neubert et al. and Lebiger-Vogel et al. in this volume).

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CHAPTER EIGHTEEN From nameless dread to bearable fear: the psychoanalytic treatment of a twenty-two-month-old child

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CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

From nameless dread to bearable fear: the psychoanalytic treatment of a twenty-two-month-old child

Agneta Sandell

T

his is about a little girl and how I understood her difficulties. The little girl was twenty two months old when she came to see me and started treatment in what we call baby analysis (Norman,

2001). In other words, she was not actually an infant but a very young child. She was a child who had just started to talk in one- and two-word sentences. The girl was in treatment with me together with her mother and the analysis went on till she was a little more than two and a half years old, thirty-two months.

The title of my chapter is “From nameless dread to bearable fear”. I will later explain what is meant by nameless dread and how I worked together with the little girl and her mother according to a model developed by a

Swedish colleague, Johan Norman. It is psychoanalytic work with infants and little children up to about two and a half years old (Norman, 2001).

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Chapter Seven: Transition to Parenthood: Studies of Intersubjectivity in Mothers and Fathers

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Massimo Ammaniti, Cristina Trentini, Francesca Menozzi, and Renata Tambelli

Introduction

Recent developments in different areas of research, psychoanalysis, infant research, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental science, highlight the dynamic, intersubjective sense of personality organised in term of “self-with-other” (Ammaniti & Trentini, 2009).

The evolution of the human species attuned human mothers, both psychologically and neurobiologically, to the smell and the sounds of the baby, and to his expressions and behaviours; in this way, mothers can immediately understand when they need to intervene to protect or feed the baby, who is immature and helpless. At the same time, babies with higher ability in tuning and understanding others have been favoured by natural selection, gaining a better chance of survival. For this reason, human infants are very social from their birth and develop that human-specific ability to read intentions and participate in collaborative activities defined by shared goals and intentions (Tomasello, 1999; Tomasello, Carpenter, Call, Behne & Moll, 2005).

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