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Activity 4 Who am I?

Donna Berry HRD Press PDF

Activity 4

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Method

Step 1: Prepare the activity.

Notes:

Prior to participants arriving, prepare name tags with names of famous people who would be known to participants.

Names can be of those who are either living or dead, real or fictional, all of the same type, or mixed.

Some examples:

John Wayne

Madonna

George Bush

Moses

Tom Sawyer

Jimmy Stewart

Cher

Bill Clinton

Jesus

Huck Finn

Another option is to prepare name tags in pairs so that the activity has two steps:

1. Find out who you are.

2. Find the person who goes with you.

For example:

Salt/Pepper

Sugar/Cream

George/Gracie

Abbott/Costello

Bush/Cheney

Bill/Hillary

Step 2: Introduce the activity.

Notes:

Review the objectives.

Explain to participants that the greater number of people they interact with, the better their chances of being successful.

Step 3: Put a name tag on the back of each participant to prevent the individual from seeing it.

Notes:

One way to do this is to give each participant a name tag and have the group stand in two circles—one within the other.

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Activity 16 Construction

Donna Berry HRD Press PDF

Activity 16

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Method

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

Notes:

This activity is more effective if the purpose is not disclosed at the outset.

Simply inform the participants that they will divide into teams of five to six members and be given a construction project to complete within the sevenminute time limit. First, they are to select a team coach.

Step 2: Brief the coaches and distribute materials.

Notes:

Take the coaches out of the room. Give each coach a black-and-white picture of an object that can be built from this particular set of building blocks or

Tinkertoys.

Instruct them to lead their team in completing the task⎯building the object to the specification shown in the picture in the seven-minute time limit. They may share the name of the object only. They can give verbal instructions to the team, but they are not allowed to touch the building pieces or show the picture to the team.

Step 3: Brief the teams.

Notes:

Explain that their task is to construct the project, according to specification, in the seven-minute time limit. (You may want to inject the competitive component at this point. Teams enjoy the pressure of working to “beat an opponent.” You may also choose to award prizes to the winners. This is completely optional. Either way, the purpose is not affected.)

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Activity 6 Picture That

Donna Berry HRD Press PDF

Activity 6

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Method

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

Notes:

Explain that in addition to writing their name on the tent card, participants should draw a representative picture of a coaching skill they currently possess

(or a coaching skill that they need and want to acquire as a result of this training). Ask that they use the broad tip markers and prepare to interpret their artwork.

Step 2: Exchange information.

Notes:

Ask participants to share introductory information (if you are using this activity as an icebreaker) along with the skill they have depicted on the tent card. If this is the first opportunity to discuss coaching skills, the skills can be compiled on a chart as the target for training. This activity can be used to remind the trainer of the participant expectations. This is also a good indicator of the current skill level so that training can be adapted to meet the needs of the audience.

Step 3: Lead a discussion as a review of this activity.

Notes:

Questions you might ask:

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Activity 43 Coaching Miscues

Donna Berry HRD Press PDF

Activity 43

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Method

Step 1: Introduce the topic and the activity.

Notes:

Review the objectives.

Use the following (or a similar) introduction:

People make mistakes. As coaches, our job is to help them make fewer mistakes so that their performance improves.

Unfortunately, we sometimes make things worse instead of better because we make errors when we coach. Often these errors seem minor and are unintentional. Still, they can cause problems in our relationship with our employees.

This activity looks at some of those errors and how to prevent them.

Step 2: Distribute Handout 43.1.

Notes:

Review the characteristics described on the handout and compare and contrast the paired descriptions.

Ask participants for specific examples of coaches who have listening skills like those described. Ask if these coaches were effective or ineffective.

Emphasize the importance of listening when involved in a coaching situation.

You might want to spend some time discussing the concept of “active listening.”

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Activity 40 Translation, Please

Donna Berry HRD Press PDF

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