100 Slices
Medium 9780874259803

Into the Future

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press PDF

6

Into the Future

Objective

The purpose of this activity is to give the participants the opportunity to think about themselves as being old and share their thoughts with other participants.

Time

15-20 minutes

Materials

Crayons or colored pencils

Paper

Flipchart and marker

Procedure

1. Ask the participants to draw a future picture of themselves as they think of what they will be like and what they may be doing when they are over the age of 70.

2. Divide participants into groups of four or five and ask them to share their drawings. Ask them to discuss what their expectations of the future were based on. They can then discuss the similarities and differences of the sources of their expectations, with particular attention to how they think they will be treated by younger people.

3. Reconvene and have them orally report on their discussions. Ask them to call out the various ways that older people are often treated, and record the responses on the flipchart.

Conclusion

Today, people live longer than ever before. Indeed, this generation is the first one able to look ahead, picture themselves as they might be, and perhaps make a difference.

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Medium 9780874259803

Gender Issues at Work

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press PDF

38

Gender Issues at Work

Objective

The purpose of this activity is to acquaint participants with a variety of gender issues that arise in the workplace and give them an opportunity to discuss gender-related issues they are facing in their own organizations. Included would be emotion in the workplace, power and control, support, stereotypes, sexuality, prior experiences and familiar roles (early “tape recordings”) and inclusion-exclusion issues.

Time

30 minutes

Materials

Sample Lecture

Overhead transparency (OHT) 38.1

Handout 38.1 for each participant

Flipchart

Procedure

1. Introduce topic by displaying OHT 38.1 and distributing Handout

38.1. Go over the various points and provide examples or a brief description of each issue. (See Sample Lecture and Trainer’s Notes.)

2. Divide participants into small groups of three to four and have each group select a reporter. Ask participants to discuss the following questions that you have already written on the flipchart. (Allow 15 to

20 minutes.) a. What have you noticed in your own workplace about work relationships between men and women? b. Think about a situation that you had in dealing with the opposite sex, one that you feel you handled extremely well. Describe what happened. What about a situation that turned out negatively, or in a way you did not expect? Describe that.

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Medium 9780874254983

Formulating Clear Agreements

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Formulating Clear Agreements

30–40 minutes

PURPOSE:

To provide participants with an opportunity to understand the importance of formulating clear agreements as the final step in resolving conflict. The participants will also observe what goes into making practical agreements, and gain practice developing them through role play.

EQUIPMENT: Flipchart

MATERIALS: None

PROCEDURE:

1. Begin by sharing the following: The last step in resolving conflict is for the disputants to agree on what actions are to be taken, and to be sure that each understands what the mutual expectations are. It is important that both parties participate equally in the discussion, and that the content of the agreement represents the best resolution attainable by the parties themselves.

2. Ask participants to think about phrases they have heard when a particular agreement is not clear and discuss what happens when expectations aren’t fully met. Give examples such as:

• “Although we agreed I would get it done, you didn’t say how you wanted it done. Now that I’m finished, you tell me how I should have done it.”

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Medium 9780874254983

Uncovering theHidden Agenda

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press, Inc. PDF

Uncovering the

Hidden Agenda

PURPOSE OF THE EXERCISE: To address two intertwined subjects: the interests of parties engaged in conflict, and how individuals can respond in a nonjudgmental way.

INTRODUCTION: Spoken words can mask a speaker’s actual interests and conceal a hidden agenda. The listener might find it helpful to go behind the speaker’s spoken words and try to identify his or her unspoken thoughts.

This might not happen quickly, but a well-reasoned discussion can reveal the speaker’s true interests.

At the same time, realize that any spoken words can take on meanings that the speaker never intended. A perfectly innocent word or phrase can trigger feelings and emotions in other people, exacerbating discord and transforming a mild conflict situation into full-blown conflict.

In all cases, the listener should reply with nonjudgmental responses.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION & WORKSHEET

Instead of addressing specific criticisms or complaints, use the technique of

Nonjudgmental Responses, which consists of (1) employing replies that will restate the speaker’s real interest, and (2) acknowledging his or her unspoken desires. This approach can be used by parties in conflict or by a neutral third party. If used judiciously, it can lower the temperature and transform a confrontation situation into a reasonable discussion. The essence of this technique is that the listener pays very close attention to the unstated thoughts of the speaker and prepares a careful response.

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Medium 9780874259803

Reviewing Your Itinerary

Jonamay Lambert HRD Press PDF

49

Reviewing Your

Itinerary

Objective

The purpose of this activity is to allow participants an opportunity to review their previous work histories and identify what they enjoy doing.

They will also review their competencies, as well as the kind of reinforcement that comes from their family and community.

Additionally, participants will begin to identify possible job matches that they may use in their job search.

Time

45-60 minutes

Materials

Sample Lecture

Exercises 49.1 and 49.2

Flipchart and marker

Procedure

1. Present the Sample Lecture, following the instructions to record the participants’ definitions on the flipchart.

2. Explain to the participants that prior work experience, volunteer work, training and hobbies are helpful in identifying the tasks that people enjoy and the skills they have attained. Also point out that in many cultures there are both positive reinforcements and negative attitudes about the work one does and the place one works. The participants should think about how their cultures view various types of work.

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