50 Chapters
Medium 9781599963525

Activity 44: That’s not what I said at all!

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44

That’s not what I said at all!

DESCRIPTION

OBJECTIVES

This activity enables participants to recognize that subjectivity can induce bias into communication processes and reduce their effectiveness.

By the end of this activity, participants will:

• Recognize the danger of introducing selectivity and

bias into reporting back procedures.

• Be able to represent other people’s views more

effectively.

PARTICIPANTS

• 6 to 12 participants

• Suitable for anyone who needs to communicate

effectively within an organization

TIME

RESOURCES

45 minutes

• Flipchart stand, paper, and markers

• Three or four sheets of 8½ x 11 paper and a pencil

or pen for each participant

METHOD

AND NOTES

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

• How often have we all heard the words, “That’s not

what I said at all”? This angry response—unless the speaker is lying—is a common reaction to being misquoted or to having one’s firmly held views contorted out of all recognition. It is one reason why many organizations place considerable importance on formal procedures like minutes of meetings; their existence is a way of ensuring agreement about what has been said and they usually allow people to challenge them—not an uncommon occurrence!

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Activity 4: Against All Odds

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4 Against All Odds

DESCRIPTION

This activity helps those new to addressing groups to overcome distractions and to concentrate on content and presentation. This activity could be followed by

Activity 23.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this activity, participants will be trained in the skill of maintaining concentration and making presentations well, in spite of distractions.

PARTICIPANTS

Any number

Anyone who needs to address a group of people formally (e.g., after-dinner speeches, reports at meetings, lectures, sales presentations)

TIME

RESOURCES

30 to 60 minutes

• Sufficient space and seating for the group to work in

independent triads

• Flipchart stand, paper, and markers

METHOD

AND NOTES

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

• One of the main fears expressed by people new to

public speaking is “I hope my mind doesn’t go blank and I can’t remember what I’m supposed to say.”

• Part of the answer to this problem is, of course, to

be well prepared. The presentation should be carefully planned: succinct notes made for easy reference during the talk and the actual presentation rehearsed so that the material, timing, etc., can be adjusted. With this amount of preparation beforehand, the chances of going blank are minimized.

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Activity 50: Why don’t you say what you mean?

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50

Why don’t you say what you mean?

DESCRIPTION

OBJECTIVES

This activity demonstrates the ambiguity of the

English language.

By the end of this activity, participants will:

• Have examined the multiple meanings of some

simple words in current English usage.

• Be aware of the importance of choosing the correct

word for effective communication to take place.

PARTICIPANTS

• Any number

• Suitable for anyone who has to speak to groups

TIME

RESOURCES

90 minutes

• Flipchart stand, paper, and markers

• Pencils or pens for participants

• Notepaper for participants

• One copy of Handouts 50.1 and 50.2 for each

participant

• One copy of the Trainer’s Notes

METHOD

AND NOTES

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

• As speakers, we often delude ourselves that our

words have been understood by our listeners in the way we intended. This is not always the case, however. Misunderstandings occur or there might be a communication breakdown. This can happen in many ways. Perhaps we have not said what we meant to convey, or our words have been misinterpreted by our listeners.

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Activity 32: Perceptions

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32 Perceptions

DESCRIPTION

OBJECTIVES

This activity enables participants to examine the accuracy of self-perception measured against the perceptions of others.

By the end of this activity, participants will:

• Understand the factors that contribute to others’

perceptions of us.

• Be more aware of the assumptions on which first

impressions are based and the dangers of acting on these assumptions.

• Recognize that how we see ourselves is often very

different from how others see us.

• Understand the importance of first impressions to

the quality of, and progress within, relationships.

PARTICIPANTS

• 6 to 20 participants

• Suitable for participants who are previously

unknown to one another, but especially relevant to sales, counseling, and interviewing courses; one-toone interactions; and group-to-one interactions.

• The activity is best conducted at the end of the first

day or at the beginning of the second day of a training program.

TIME

RESOURCES

2 hours and 30 minutes (including preparation time)

• Sufficient seating and space for a full group

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Activity 37: Self-Disclosure

Sue Bishop HRD Press, Inc. PDF

37 Self-Disclosure

DESCRIPTION

OBJECTIVES

This activity is designed to allow participants to experience and identify the benefits of self-disclosure.

This should be used only where the trainer is confident that the group, and individuals in it, are sufficiently supportive to each other to be able to derive the benefits.

By the end of this activity, participants will:

• Know the value of appropriate self-disclosure as an

aid to decision making.

• Be able to use appropriate self-disclosure as a

means of enhancing interpersonal skills with selected people.

PARTICIPANTS

• 6 to 20 participants (even numbers if possible)

• Suitable for managers and supervisors

TIME

1½ to 2 hours

RESOURCES

One copy of Handouts 37.1 through 37.3 for each participant

METHOD

AND NOTES

Step 1: Introduce the activity.

• The activity is designed to allow participants to

explore self-disclosure as a technique. The emphasis throughout this activity will be on appropriate selfdisclosure. It is not always easy or appropriate to use it, but it can have remarkable benefits when used selectively and with care. It requires a level of trust between the two people who will be involved.

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