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CHAPTER THREE: Torture-based mind control: psychological mechanisms and psychotherapeutic approaches to overcoming mind control

Orit Badouk Epstein Karnac Books ePub

Ellen P. Lacter

“Can we get control of an individual to the point where he will do our bidding against his will and even against such fundamental laws of nature such as self-preservation?”

(CIA Document, Project ARTICHOKE, MORI ID 144686, 1952)

Psychological mechanisms

My goal in this chapter is to analyse through established psychological principles how torture-based mind control programming is installed and exerts continued control over victims.

It is painfully humbling to study mind control. The secrets of how it “works” are buried deeply in the minds of survivors whose mental registration of the process was originally impaired by torture, drugs, smoke and mirrors, and dissociative processes, both defensive and effected by abuser manipulation, and whose capacity to later recall and reveal this trauma is limited by terror, abuser subterfuge, and the capacity of the therapist to bear witness to suchcalculated abuse. Further complicating this study is the variation in methods and forms of mind control reported by survivors.

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Appendix I - Reading List

Karnac Books ePub

Books

Allen, J., Als, H., Lewis, J. & Litwack, L. F. (2008). Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America. Santa Fe, NM: Twin Palms.

Bergmann, M. V. (1982). Thoughts on superego pathology of survivors and their children. In: M. S. Bergmann & M. Jucovy (Eds.), Generations of the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 1990.

Bizos, G. (1998). No One to Blame? In Pursuit of Justice in South Africa. Cape Town, South Africa: David Philip/Mayibuye.

Blackwell, D. (2005). Counselling and Psychotherapy with Refugees. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Bloom, S. (1997). Creating Sanctuary: Toward the Evolution of Sane Societies. London: Routledge.

Breger, L. (2000). Freud: Darkness in the Midst of Vision. Chichester: Wiley.

Bromberg, P. M. (2001). Standing in the Spaces: Essays on Clinical Process, Trauma and Dissociation. New York: Analytic Press.

Busch, F. (Ed.) (2008). Mentalization: Theoretical Considerations, Research Findings, and Clinical Implications. New York: Analytic Press.

Cameron, J. (1994). A Time of Terror. Baltimore: Black Classics Press.

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Appendix II - Introduction to the Bowlby Centre

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Promoting attachment and inclusion

Since 1976 The Bowlby Centre (formerly known as CAPP) has developed as an organisation committed to the practice of attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The Bowlby Centre is a dynamic, rapidly developing charity which aims both to train attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapists and to deliver a psychotherapy service to those who are most marginalised and frequently excluded from long term psychotherapy.

We provide a four year part-time psychotherapy training accredited by the UKCP and operate a psychotherapy referral service for the public including the low cost Blues Project. The Bowlby Centre has a wealth of experience in the fields of attachment and loss and particular expertise in working with trauma and abuse. As part of our ongoing commitment to anti-discriminatory practice we offer a consultation service to the public and private sectors and are engaged in outreach and special projects working with care leavers, women experiencing violence and abuse, offenders and ex-offenders, people struggling with addiction to drugs, alcohol, eating difficulties or self-harm, and to individuals and groups in a wide variety of mental health settings.

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CHAPTER FIVE: Working with the Incredible Hulk

Orit Badouk Epstein Karnac Books ePub

Orit Badouk Epstein

It is a known fact that working with survivors of ritual abuse mainly involves working with female survivors. Less has been said about working with male survivors. I am going to tell you about some of my experiences with a male survivor of ritual abuse. My client, a twenty-eight-year old, very intelligent and highly creative young man, came to see me after spending most of his adult life wandering from AA to SLA (Sex, Love Anonymous) trying to combat his addiction to alcohol and watching pornography on the Internet and making calls to phone sex lines.

I will name him Bruce, after the character from the film The Hulk, and later on I will explain the link. Bruce was born into an upper middle-class, well-educated family (his maternal grandfather went to Oxbridge, and paternal grandmother was from the aristocracy). He grew up in a wealthy village where the golf and rugby clubs were the hub of a well-established and well-connected paedophile ring. It was in this leafy rural setting that the most horrific childhood sexual and physical abuse and mind control took place, concealed within a middle-class environment more closely associated with cream teas, Christmas parties, and sporting activities that enhanced their masculinity and superiority. These people were wellconnected, with access to finance, weapons, factories, mansions, and even aircraft.

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Chapter Four - The Place of Fear in Attachment Theory and Psychoanalysis: The Fifteenth John Bowlby Memorial Lecture

Karnac Books ePub

Arietta Slade

Introduction

Today I will be talking about fear and its place in attachment theory and psychoanalysis. In the hierarchy of human motivations, Bowlby placed particular emphasis on attachment because it is essential to our physical and psychological survival. And he privileged fear of loss and danger because these elemental reactions drive and organise the activation and deactivation of the attachment system, regulate physical and psychological proximity seeking and contact maintenance, and shape the organisation of mental life.

At the time that Bowlby began formulating his theory of human attachment, psychoanalysis placed virtually no emphasis on the role of fear and the search for safety in the development of personality and psychopathology. This had much to do, of course, with Freud's particular interest in internal reality, and his relative lack of interest in relationships. Bowlby, by contrast, was greatly interested in actual experience, and believed that attending to the dynamics of fear and its regulation within the context of actual attachment relationships would fundamentally change psychoanalysis (1969, 1973, 1980, 1988). For Bowlby, an emphasis on fear and the search for safety offered a crucial corrective to the theories of motivation, development, and psychopathology that prevailed in psychoanalysis at the time. For many years, however, this corrective fell on deaf ears within the analytic community, which actively rejected Bowlby and his ideas for several decades.

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