12 Chapters
Medium 9780253015167

Egypt

Roy Armes Indiana University Press ePub

There are a number of directors with very different backgrounds, born in the 1950s, who made a first feature film in the 2000s, among them Khalid Ghorbal, Nawfel Saheb-Ettaba, Nidhal Chatta, Khaled W. Barsaoui, and Ibrahim Letaief. Ghorbal came from the theatre, Saheb-Ettaba and Chatta are marked by lengthy periods spent abroad, and Barsaoui and Letaief are products of the Tunisian enthusiasm for ciné clubs and amateur filmmaking.

Khalid Ghorbal, who was born in 1950 in Tunisia, is based in France; his earlier work, except for the short, The Chosen One / L’élu (1996), was in theatre, which he had studied first in Tunis (at the Centre d’Art Dramatique) and then in Paris (the Université Internationale du Théâtre de Paris and the École Jacques Lecoq). He directed the most widely distributed film by any of this group of older directors, Fatma, in Tunisia in 2001. The film sets out to confront the practice of repairing a woman’s vagina—just three stitches required—after she has been raped. It is Ghorbal says, “a strange compromise which seems to sort out things for everyone: the future husband, whose honor will be safe and his virility intact, as well as the young woman, who will have a husband and in that way become a wife and mother.” But underlying this is a basic hypocrisy, “which weighs only on the woman.”66

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Medium 9780253015167

The Gulf

Roy Armes Indiana University Press ePub

Contemporary Lebanese cinema in the 2000s, like Algerian filmmaking, is largely a cinema of exiles. Many of the new generation, born since 1960, have close links with Paris, among them Philippe Aractingi, Michel Kammoun, Chadi Zeneddine, and more recently, Georges Hachem.

Philippe Aractingi, who was born in 1964 in Beirut, studied at the CLCF in Paris. He began his television career in Lebanon, before moving back to Paris, where he worked for twenty years in French television, many of his documentaries dealing with Arab issues. He has subsequently made two feature films in Lebanon.

The Bus / L’autobus / Bosta (2005), described by its author as a musical road movie and a huge popular success in Lebanon, was a very conscious effort on Aractingi’s part to get beyond the constant chronicling of deaths and disasters which characterized his documentary output for French television. On the death of his father, Kamal, a composer and choreographer, returns from fifteen years of exile in France to reunite some of his dance-school classmates to present his new “techno” version of the traditional Lebanese dance, the dabke. When this is rejected out-of-hand by the authorities overseeing the national festival at Anjar, the group decide to renovate the old school bus and take their dance production on a tour around Lebanon. They are supported by a national television company which broadcasts daily accounts of their progress (but only, as Kamal finally discovers, for sordid commercial reasons).

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Medium 9780253015167

Tunisia

Roy Armes Indiana University Press ePub

There are a number of directors with very different backgrounds, born in the 1950s, who made a first feature film in the 2000s, among them Khalid Ghorbal, Nawfel Saheb-Ettaba, Nidhal Chatta, Khaled W. Barsaoui, and Ibrahim Letaief. Ghorbal came from the theatre, Saheb-Ettaba and Chatta are marked by lengthy periods spent abroad, and Barsaoui and Letaief are products of the Tunisian enthusiasm for ciné clubs and amateur filmmaking.

Khalid Ghorbal, who was born in 1950 in Tunisia, is based in France; his earlier work, except for the short, The Chosen One / L’élu (1996), was in theatre, which he had studied first in Tunis (at the Centre d’Art Dramatique) and then in Paris (the Université Internationale du Théâtre de Paris and the École Jacques Lecoq). He directed the most widely distributed film by any of this group of older directors, Fatma, in Tunisia in 2001. The film sets out to confront the practice of repairing a woman’s vagina—just three stitches required—after she has been raped. It is Ghorbal says, “a strange compromise which seems to sort out things for everyone: the future husband, whose honor will be safe and his virility intact, as well as the young woman, who will have a husband and in that way become a wife and mother.” But underlying this is a basic hypocrisy, “which weighs only on the woman.”66

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Medium 9780253015167

Palestine

Roy Armes Indiana University Press ePub

Contemporary Lebanese cinema in the 2000s, like Algerian filmmaking, is largely a cinema of exiles. Many of the new generation, born since 1960, have close links with Paris, among them Philippe Aractingi, Michel Kammoun, Chadi Zeneddine, and more recently, Georges Hachem.

Philippe Aractingi, who was born in 1964 in Beirut, studied at the CLCF in Paris. He began his television career in Lebanon, before moving back to Paris, where he worked for twenty years in French television, many of his documentaries dealing with Arab issues. He has subsequently made two feature films in Lebanon.

The Bus / L’autobus / Bosta (2005), described by its author as a musical road movie and a huge popular success in Lebanon, was a very conscious effort on Aractingi’s part to get beyond the constant chronicling of deaths and disasters which characterized his documentary output for French television. On the death of his father, Kamal, a composer and choreographer, returns from fifteen years of exile in France to reunite some of his dance-school classmates to present his new “techno” version of the traditional Lebanese dance, the dabke. When this is rejected out-of-hand by the authorities overseeing the national festival at Anjar, the group decide to renovate the old school bus and take their dance production on a tour around Lebanon. They are supported by a national television company which broadcasts daily accounts of their progress (but only, as Kamal finally discovers, for sordid commercial reasons).

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Medium 9780253015167

Lebanon

Roy Armes Indiana University Press ePub

There are a number of directors with very different backgrounds, born in the 1950s, who made a first feature film in the 2000s, among them Khalid Ghorbal, Nawfel Saheb-Ettaba, Nidhal Chatta, Khaled W. Barsaoui, and Ibrahim Letaief. Ghorbal came from the theatre, Saheb-Ettaba and Chatta are marked by lengthy periods spent abroad, and Barsaoui and Letaief are products of the Tunisian enthusiasm for ciné clubs and amateur filmmaking.

Khalid Ghorbal, who was born in 1950 in Tunisia, is based in France; his earlier work, except for the short, The Chosen One / L’élu (1996), was in theatre, which he had studied first in Tunis (at the Centre d’Art Dramatique) and then in Paris (the Université Internationale du Théâtre de Paris and the École Jacques Lecoq). He directed the most widely distributed film by any of this group of older directors, Fatma, in Tunisia in 2001. The film sets out to confront the practice of repairing a woman’s vagina—just three stitches required—after she has been raped. It is Ghorbal says, “a strange compromise which seems to sort out things for everyone: the future husband, whose honor will be safe and his virility intact, as well as the young woman, who will have a husband and in that way become a wife and mother.” But underlying this is a basic hypocrisy, “which weighs only on the woman.”66

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