18 Slices
Medium 9781782200727

Chapter Twelve: Gerhard Schneider (Germany)

Karnac Books ePub

 

Gerhard Schneider is a DPhil, Dipl-Psych, Dipl-Math. He works in a private psychoanalytical practice in Mannheim, Germany. He is a training and supervising analyst of the German Psychoanalytic Association (DPV). He was on the board of the DPV from 2006 to 2012, and president of the DPV from 2008 to 2010. Dr Schneider was chair of the IPA Psychoanalysis and Culture Committee from 2009 to 2013. His psychoanalytic interests comprise psychoanalytic technique and attitude, internalisation and identity, culture, as well as film and the visual arts. He has written numerous papers on these topics.

 

Present: Gerhard Schneider (GS), Kerry Malawista (KM), Bob Winer (BW)

Our final interview at the Prague Congress was with Gerhard Schneider. Dr Schneider came to psychoanalysis by way of mathematics—hardly the usual route for an analyst. We were taken with Dr Schneider's youthful spirit, and the openness and curiosity he brings to psychoanalysis, including the many ways he carries forward his thinking in the areas of culture, art, and society.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781782200727

Chapter One: Stefano Bolognini (Italy)

Karnac Books ePub

 

Stefano Bolognini is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in Bologna. He is past president of the Italian Psychoanalytical Society and current president of the International Psychoanalytical Association. He is the author of two hundred psychoanalytic papers published in several languages, of specialist books (Psychoanalytic Empathy; Secret Passages: The Theory and Technique of Interpsychic Relations), and of novels (Like Wind, Like Wave; Zen and the Art of Not Knowing What to Say).

 

Present:

Stefano Bolognini (SB), Kerry Malawista (KM), Bob Winer (BW)

We had travelled from Washington, DC, for the January 2013 National Meeting of the American Psychoanalytic Association in New York City—a four-hour train trip. Our plan was to interview Stefano Bolognini and several other European analysts attending the meeting. Early in our session with Dr Bolognini, we learned that he had made a four-hour round-trip commute, Bologna to Venice, for the entire duration of his training analysis. This told us a great deal about Dr Bolognini's determination to become a psychoanalyst and his passion for the discipline. And that passion still comes through: Dr Bolognini is eager to learn new ideas, apply them to his practice, and to fashion his own way of being an analyst.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781782200727

Chapter Seventeen: Donald Moss (United States)

Karnac Books ePub

 

Donald Moss, PhD has been in private practice in New York City for over forty years. He is the author of Hating in the First Person Plural (2003), Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Man (2012), and At War with the Obvious (in press), and over fifty articles. He is on the editorial boards of Psychoanalytic Quarterly and the International Journal of Psychoanalysis.

 

Present: Donald Moss (DM), Kerry Malawista (KM), Bob Winer (BW)

In September 2014, we travelled by train to New York City to meet with Don Moss. We entered his modern Greenwich Village office, and there in the middle of the room was an oversized black leather couch. Attached to the back of the couch, where the patient's head would lie, were blue fibreglass wings—the kind you would expect to see on a fast sports car. It wasn't the last time that we discovered that Dr Moss has a distinct way of thinking and a mind of his own.

It is a curious circumstance that when people remember the striking moments from their analyses, they are often times when the analyst was in one way or another “human”, and these are generally non-interpretive events that in one way or another express the analyst's interest in the person. From the analysts’ point of view, these would probably not be the most memorable occasions in their work—for analysts, those tend to be moments when an understanding unexpectedly crystallises: “Oh, that's what that's about!” But the patient's response reflects something Dr Moss said, “I think they are alert to you as a person more than you as a speaking person.” There was such a moment for Dr Moss, in his first session with his first analyst: “At some point as I was telling him about this crashing stuff, he kind of closed his eyes as though to indicate it was practically unbearable how much this was, and it was a very, very sympathetic gesture. And I thought, yeah, this is what I want.” Dr Greenberg, in another first session, said to a patient, “Your life seems grey,” which seemed to touch the patient very deeply, and led to the patient deciding to work with him. Obviously, such moments can't be contrived, they will only feel real if they're spontaneous. A patient, narcissistically damaged and quite stuck in his treatment, had just bought a new car. His analyst, with some enthusiasm, asked to see it, and they went outside to check it out. The patient felt sceptical about the enthusiasm, thought it a bit forced and out of character for his analyst, but he appreciated at that moment how hard his analyst was trying to make contact with him, even against his own grain, and it stuck as a very significant moment in the analysis.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781782200727

Chapter Four: Rosemary Balsam (United States)

Karnac Books ePub

 

Rosemary H. Balsam, FRCPsych (London), MRCP (Edinburgh), first trained in medicine and psychiatry in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She is associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the Yale Medical School, staff member of the Department of Student Mental Health and Counseling there, and training analyst at the Western New England Institute for Psychoanalysis. She has a clinical practice in New Haven, Connecticut. She writes on gender, female development, and the work of Hans Loewald. Dr Balsam is the book review co-editor for the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, and on the editorial board of Psychoanalytic Quarterly and Imago. She has written the book Women's Bodies in Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 2012). rosemary.balsam@yale.edu

 

Present:

Rosemary Balsam (RB), Kerry Malawista (KM), Bob Winer (BW)

We had travelled by train to the offices of the Western New England Psychoanalytic Society in New Haven, Connecticut, to meet with Rosemary Balsam. We were early for our appointment, so we toured the main floor of the historic building. The walls were filled with photographs of such analysts as Erik Erikson, Muriel Gardiner, and Hans Loewald. When Dr Balsam arrived, she greeted us warmly, and we heard the traces of a lovely Irish brogue. She shared her clinical experiences with us, particularly her interest in and understanding of female psychology.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781782200727

Chapter Eight: Cláudio Eizirik (Brazil)

Karnac Books ePub

 

Cláudio Eizirik is a training and supervising analyst at the Porto Alegre Psychoanalytic Society, and a professor of psychiatry at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. Dr Eizirik is the past president of the International Psychoanalytical Association, and the author of books, chapters, and papers on analytic training, analytic practice, the process of ageing, and the relation of psychoanalysis and culture. He received the Sigourney Award in 2011. ceizirik.ez@terra.com.br

 

Present: Cláudio Eizirik (CE), Kerry Malawista (KM), Bob Winer (BW)

The only interview we held via Skype was with Cláudio Eizirik. We had planned to meet with Dr Eizirik while in Prague, but because of a family emergency, he had to cancel his trip. We worried that Skype would not provide the intimacy of our in-person interviews. Once the online interview began, our fears were allayed. Dr Eizirik's warmth and intelligence easily came through the digital divide. He offered us a view of the ongoing changes in priorities and thinking a psychoanalyst must embrace to remain attuned to his patients.

See All Chapters

See All Slices