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Fort Griffin

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414875

FORT MCKAVETT

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Mckavett

Construction began on Fort McKavett during the summer of 1852, another in a line of new forts established to protect the westward advance of settlers and travelers through central Texas. The post received its name in honor of Captain Henry McKavett, an officer killed on September 21, 1846, during the Battle of Monterrey while serving with the Eighth Infantry during the Mexican War. (Sullivan 1969, 138) Five companies of this same regiment, under the command of Colonel Thomas Staniford, arrived on the banks of the San Saba River in March 1852. Orders issued by General Persifer Smith, military commander in Texas, specified the new post location at the headspring of the San Saba. This was initially adhered to, though by May a more suitable site was chosen approximately two miles downriver which afforded a natural spring and lagoon.

The post was constructed roughly three hundred yards from the lagoon and five hundred yards from the river, providing the fort with an unending supply of water. (Sullivan 1969; Crimmins 1950, 308)

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FORT BELKNAP

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Belknap

Southward from Jacksboro take Highway 4 to Graford, which takes its name from its position halfway between Graham and Weatherford.

The first settler of the community was George R. Bevers in 1854, who located at Flat Rock Crossing on Big Keechi Creek, three miles east. This became a well-known stopping place on the road between Weatherford and Fort Belknap. Today there is not much in Graford although it is the home of Big Tex porkskins. Other than for the scenic drive, you might want to bypass Graford and go straight to Graham from Jacksboro along Highway 380.

From Graford take either Highway 337, the man direct, route to Graham, or Highway 16 which stays on the Forts Trail along the west side of Possum Kingdom.

Graham was founded in 1872 by Gustavus and Edwin S. Graham, and it soon became a mercantile and milling center. The Cattle Raisers Association of Texas, which was the predecessor of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, was organized here in 1877.

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FORT RICHARDSON

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Richardson

The northernmost fort of the line to be established was Fort Richardson, located near Jacksboro on US Highway 281, 62 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

Jacksboro and Jack County were named after two Texas Revolutionary patriots, brothers William H. and Patrick C. Jack. The brothers were from a family of patriots. Their grandfather, Captain James Jack of Mecklenburg, North Carolina, was one of the signers of the famous Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence during the American Revolution. Their father, Patrick Jack, a prominent lawyer in Wilkes County, Georgia, was an officer in the War of 1812. The Jack brothers both graduated from the University of Georgia with law degrees, and shortly afterward headed for Texas. William arrived in San Felipe in 1830, and was joined by Patrick in 1832. Patrick was arrested with William B. Travis at Anahuac in 1832; William was with Sam Houston at San Jacinto.

After the war, Patrick served in the Texas House and as District Judge of the Sixth District. William served as Secretary of State under Burnet in 1836, and served terms in both the Texas House and Senate. The brothers died of yellow fever in 1844.

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Fort Davis

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF

Additional Forts •

141

of raiding Indians. A group settled in Brackettville around Fort Clark. Descendants remain as farmers and ranchers and maintain the old cemetery which includes the graves of four Medal of Honor winners.

FORT DAVIS

In October of 1854, Brevet General Persifor F. Smith, commanding the Department of Texas, selected the site of Fort Davis and named the post after Secretary of War Jefferson Davis. Six companies of the Eighth United States Infantry under Lieutenant Colonel Washington Seawell arrived at Painted Comanche

Camp, the site of an Indian village, on Limpia Creek to build and garrison the post. Confederate cavalry under Colonel John R.

Baylor occupied the fort for almost a year, then retreated to San

Antonio after failing to take New Mexico.

Federal troops under Lieutenant Colonel Wesley Merritt reoccupied the fort and began construction of a new post. Fort Davis became a major installation with quarters for more than 600 men and more than sixty adobe and stone structures. From 1867 to

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