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Back to Jacksboro

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Back to Jacksboro

Fort Mason is the last of the forts on the Texas Forts Trail. From here the route travels north through central Texas to Jacksboro and roughly follows the military supply route to Forts Griffin and Richardson. Each of the communities along the way of the supply route benefited from the presence of military traffic as well as from the civilian supply trains traveling along the trail.

From Mason, head northeast along County Road 386 to Fredonia.

Fredonia was settled by W. L. and Samuel P. Hays in the late 1850s. After the Civil War the community began to grow as new settlers moved into the region. In 1879 a post office named Deerton was established, but the name was changed a year later to Fredonia.

The village of Voca was settled in 1879 by John Deans and named for his old home, Voca, Arkansas. Seven miles west of Voca is the site of old Camp San Saba, on the San Saba River.

From Fredonia, head back northwest along State Highway 71 which leads you by Voca in southwest McCulloch County.

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Back to Jacksboro

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF

128•Back to JacksboroTOURIST INFORMATION(When possible please call ahead to be sure these services are still available.)Brady (915 / 597-3491)PopuIatUm:5,924lAJcn and Paris:Lake Brady, City Park, Kenneth Medlock RangePoints ofinternt:Heart of Texas Historical Museum contains early ranch and home exhibits, farm implements, pioneer weapons, vintage photos, and memorabilia.Housed in restored county jail (c. 1910), still exhibiting cells and prisoner hardware. Open Saturday, Sunday, and Monday afternoons. Corner ofHigh and Main Streets, one block west of town square.McCulloch County CourthouseMcCulloch County MuseumRestored Santa Fe Depot serves as an art gallery and studio, at Depot and North Bridge StreetsAnnual events:January: County Livestock Show and SaleMarch,June, October: Texas Muzzle Loading RifleAssociationMay: Cinco de Mayo Celebration, Heart of TexasGolf Tournamen tJune: Miss Heart of Texas PageantJuly: Jubilee Celebration, 4th of July, Stan GuffeyMemorialJunior RodeoAugust: Brady Junior Rodeo

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Fort Leaton

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414875

FORT CONCHO

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor The University of Chicago Press ePub

Fort

Concho

During the 1860s Charles Goodnight, Oliver Loving, and others drove large cattle herds to New Mexico and Colorado along the Butterfield Trail, and Indian activity once again became a problem in the region. The Comanches were bellicose, and need of military protection along the upper Concho River country was imperative. Fort Chadbourne, which had more than four hundred troops, provided some security for a period, but it was not located where protection was needed most. Furthermore, the fort continued to suffer from the persistent problem of an inadequate water supply.

Accordingly, in November 1867, an army locating party selected a new site at the junction of the Concho Rivers, where the main (North) branch of the Concho joins the waters of the Middle Concho, Dove Creek, Spring Creek, and South Concho. This location served as the site for construction of a new fort to replace Chadbourne. The post was established in December as Camp Hatch by 388 men of the Fourth Cavalry under Captain George P. Huntt. The name originated in recognition of Major John P. Hatch of the same regiment. He respectfully declined the honor, and one month later in January it was renamed Camp Kelly in honor of Major Michael J. Kelly, again a member of the Fourth, whose death the previous August inspired the tribute. In February 1868, the post was renamed Fort Concho. (Bitner 1933, 10; Conger 1966, 89, 92; Haley 1952, 126, 130; Gregory 1957, 19)

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Fort Duncan

B. W. Aston and Donathan Taylor University of North Texas Press PDF

146

Additional Forts

Limpia Cottage, on the side of Sleeping Lion Mountain, 915-426-3237, 800-662-5517

Line Shack Texas, Cemetery Road, 915-426-3097

Neill Doll Museum Bed & Breakfast, Court Street,

915-426-3969 or 426-3838

Paradise Mountain Ranch Bed & Breakfast, located on a working ranch 15 miles west of Fort Davis on Highway 166, 915-426-3737, 800-648-9162.

Veranda Country Inn Bed & Breakfast, Court Street,

1 block west of the courthouse, 915-426-2233.

Historic adobe inn.

Veranda Country Inn Carriage House, 1 block west of courthouse, 915-426-2233. Located behind the inn's gardens.

Wayside Inn Bed & Breakfast, NW of downtown at the base of Sleeping Lion Mountain, 915-4263535,800-582-7510.

FORTDUNCAN

Fort Duncan, located on the east side of the Rio Grande just above Eagle Pass, was established on March 27, 1849, by Captain

Sidney Burank, and occupied by three companies of the First U.

S. Infantry Regiment. During the Civil War the post was occupied by Confederate troops of the Frontier Regiment. Federal troops reoccupied the post in 1868. It remained under military authority until 1916. Its primary purpose was to protect the trade crossing into Mexico and travelers along the road to El Paso. It was taken over by the city in 1935, and today many restored stone buildings form the center of a municipal park and country club. The old headquarters serves as a museum. For additional information call

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