9 Chapters
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3: Patients and their Background, and the Group-Analytic Process (S. H. F.)

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CHAPTER THREE

Patients and their Background, and the

Group-Analytic Process

Patients and their complaints.

The underlying neurotic suffering is always mental conflict.

Therapy involves creating a better balance from disequilibrium.

Social hostility to neurosis.

The real underlying causes are usually hidden. The need for

'translation •.

Psychological illness just as real as organic disease.

Psychogenetic disturbances arise from childhood conflicts.

Summary of individual analysis.

The group-analytic parallels: a network of horizontal transferences instead of a vertical transference.

The complex nature of the Iota/field of inter-personal relationships in which a disturbance arises. The patient's unawareness of this. The less change he wants, the more he needs it.

The group situation must allow for(i) 'Translation •;

(ii) An approach to the 'social unconscious';

(ill) Participation of the members themselves.

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6: The Natural History of the Therapeutic Group (E.J .A.)

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PART THREE

CHAPTER SIX

The Natural History of the Therapeutic

Group

The genesi! of conflict

Specific conflicts

Some hypothetical stages

The natural history (i) Initial phase

(ii) Intermediate phase

(iii) Terminal phase

Children's groups(i) The Nursery group

(ii) The Latency group: Discussion phase and Activity phase

(iii) The Adolescent group

Studies in psychapathology

Group exploration in psychopathology

151

CHAPTER SIX

The Natural History of the Therapeutic Group

psychotherapeutic group is a mirror not only for the patient but also for the analytic theorist, who can look in on this complex scene and note what he will. There are no limits to the possible descriptive subtleties open to him, and he may find himself exhibiting surprisingly different group models from those of his colleagues. Conceptions -will alter with preconceptions. Certain aspects of these conceptual models, however, tend to repeat themselves.

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4: Some Technical and Practical Aspects of the Group-Analytic Situation (E.J.A.)

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CHAl'TER FOUR

Some Technical and Practical Aspects of the Group-Analytic Situation

Therapy and research go on simultaneously: the group as an instrument for both

The Group-analytic Situation

Material arrangements:

The circle

Seating arrangements

Numbers

Morphology of the group

Principles of selection: (a) general, (b) specific

Heterogeneous, intermediate, and homogeneous groups

Open and closed groups

Group selection by the group

Combined treatment

Time and duration, frequency

The general management of the T-situation

Fears about group treatment

Psychological aspects:

Supportive factors

Group-analytic factors

Patterns of communication and relationship

Illustration from serial record

87

CHAPTER FOUR

Some Technical and Practical Aspects of the

Group-Analytic Situation

EvERY therapeutic episode can be regarded somewhat loosely as an experiment or essay in research. This concomitance of treatment and research is now a commonplace in medicine and is largely responsible for advances in the field of therapy. For many psychotherapists, h<;>wever, even this moderate scientific attitude is felt to interpose an emotional distance between the therapist and his patient. Research is interpreted as an active interference with the spontaneous evolution of the therapeutic relationship.

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2: Significant Features of the Group-Analytic Group, in Relation to other Types of Human Groups (S. H. F.)

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CHAPTER TWO

Significant Features of the Group-Analytic

Group, in Relation to Other Types of

Human Groups

Groups in general.

Activity groups: their manifest 'occupation', and latent 'preoccupation'.

The 'occupation' acts as a defence against personal interaction.

Therapeutic groups: No specific 'occupation' necessary, the fact of participation becomes the centre of interest.

Psychotherapeutic groups: three preconditions(i) Verbal communication;

(ii) The individual is the object of treatment;

(iii) The group itself is the chief therapeutic agent.

The group-analytic psychotherapeutic group: differentiated by the following main points (i) The use of 'free-floating discussion', 'free-group association' corresponding to 'free-association' of psycho-analysis;

(ii) The material produced is analyzed;

(iii) The 'latent' content of the discussion is treated as important.

A brief outline of the individual psycho-analytic situation.

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1: Introductory Survey (E. J. A.)

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PART ONE

CHAPTER ONE

Introductory Survey

Introductory:

The dichotomy between inner and outer standards.

The Freudian approach: its concept of' transference'.

The dynamics of the group: various views of psycho-analytically oriented authors:

S. R. Slavson's theory: psycho-analytically oriented group psychotherapy.

A. Wolf's 'psycho-analysis' ofgroups.

J. D. Sutherland's and H. Ezrlel's work: emphasis on the

'here and now' aspects of the transference between group and therapist.

S. H. Foulkes' group-analytic psychotherapy: spontaneous communications by individual me,mbers treated as 'group associations'; all members active participants in the total therapeutic process; the group-analytic situation as a transference situation analyzed in terms of structure, process and content.

Historical developments of group-analysis:

The concept of'social neurosis'.

Trigant Burrow's nation of the neurotic social order.

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