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Chapter 10: Convince the Crowd

Katie Rogers Marzano Research ePub

10

Convince the Crowd

For high school students

Convince the Crowd is a competitive debate game in which the teacher proposes a motion and two panels of students discuss it. Before a single speech is made, an audience of classmates votes either in favor of the motion or against it. The audience casts their votes on the same motion a second time after the debate takes place, allowing everyone to see which side has persuaded the most audience members to change their vote. The side that has the highest percentage difference between before votes and after votes is declared the winner.

This game is recommended for high school students who have had lots of practice with research and argumentation. It works especially well in language arts, science, and social studies classes. The game is modeled after Intelligence Squared (stylized as intelligence2 or IQ2) debates (www.intelligencesquared.com). Motions in past Intelligence Squared debates cover a broad spectrum of topics, from politics (“The rich are taxed enough”) to environmental issues (“The natural gas boom is doing more harm than good”) to entertainment (“Ban college football”). We highly recommend showing one of these debates to students so they can get an overall picture of what a debate looks like and an idea of what form their classroom debates should take.

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Chapter 8: Rhetoric Memory

Katie Rogers Marzano Research ePub

8

Rhetoric Memory

For middle school and high school students

In Rhetoric Memory, which is based on the classic game Memory, students identify two expressions of the same concept (which have different connotations) and match them together. The student with the most matched pairs at the end of the game wins. Here’s the catch: in order to keep a match, a student must explain the connotations of both expressions.

Setup

To play, middle school students must understand the terms connotation and denotation and be able to identify various connotations of words with similar definitions. Additionally, high school students must understand how to evaluate persuasive rhetoric.

Create a set of cards for each group of students. Cards must be printed as double-sided copies and then cut apart. When created properly, one side of the card will show a term with a connotative meaning and the other side will show the definition for the term. To illustrate, figure 8.1 (page 162) shows the front and back sides of a matching pair.

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Chapter 2: Opinion Scoot

Katie Rogers Marzano Research ePub

2

Opinion Scoot

For middle elementary students

Opinion Scoot is based on a popular stations activity called “Scoot” (sometimes called “Scooch” or “Skedaddle”) in which students rotate from desk to desk and respond to a different question at each one. In this adaptation, we have added an element in which students vote on specific questions by dropping tokens in cups at each station. This game is designed to give elementary students practice with stating opinions and explaining their reasoning. To play, students need basic reading, writing, and counting skills. They do not need to know terms like claim, grounds, backing, or qualifier, nor do they need to be perfect spellers, fluent readers, or master grammarians.

Setup

We recommend setting up students’ desks for this game before they arrive in the room. First, lay a question card face up on each desk. Teachers can use the premade question cards at the end of this chapter (see pages 63–68), or they can make their own.

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Appendix A: Facts and Opinions

Katie Rogers Marzano Research ePub

Appendix A Facts and Opinions

Organized by level of difficulty

This appendix can be used for:

I Think, I Like, I Believe

Fishing for Facts

Rapid Fire

The following tables contain lists of facts and opinions to use in elementary classrooms. Middle school teachers may also decide to consult these lists for review with sixth- or seventh-grade students. The statements presented in these lists are generally designed to require little to no background knowledge to distinguish them as facts or opinions.

The facts and opinions are organized by difficulty into three tables: easy, medium, and challenging. Each table contains a set of seventy facts and opinions to use with students. Groupings are based on the complexity of the vocabulary used and the amount of content knowledge a student needs to recognize facts. Use preassessments and your judgment as a teacher to determine which list to use with your students. To illustrate, consider the following fact from the challenging list: “The eight planets in the solar system are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.” A first grader may or may not be familiar with the eight planets, but a fifth grader almost certainly will. Similarly, an easy fact, such as “One plus one equals two,” while appropriate for early elementary students, will not challenge students in upper elementary.

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Chapter 6: Which One Doesn’t Belong?

Katie Rogers Marzano Research ePub

6

Which One Doesn’t Belong?

For upper elementary, middle school, and high school students

Which One Doesn’t Belong? is based on a segment on the children’s series Sesame Street called “One of These Things Is Not Like the Others.” In the television version of the game, a group of four items is displayed, one of which differs somehow from the other three, and young viewers choose the item that does not fit. The game has since enjoyed adaptation for use in puzzles, websites, and games, including a classroom vocabulary game (Carleton & Marzano, 2010). Unlike the television show, the spin-off described in this book is not intended for preschoolers. Instead, it is designed to help upper elementary, middle, and high school students practice recognizing the various elements of effective arguments.

Setup

To play, elementary students must be able to distinguish evidence that supports an opinion from evidence that does not. Middle school students must understand the need for backing to support grounds and claims, as well as the three different types of backing (expert opinion, research results, and factual information). High school students need to understand the concept of a qualifier. They also need to know how to identify biased language, which is part of evaluating persuasive rhetoric (pages 34–35). Some high school questions ask students to identify qualifiers; others ask them to identify biased terms in statements.

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