10 Chapters
Medium 9781591202684

CONCLUSION: Create an Individualized Treatment Plan

Prousky M.Sc. N.D., Jonathan E. Basic Health Publications ePub

CONCLUSION

Create an Individualized Treatment Plan

If you have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and want to obtain a better and more enjoyable quality of life, it is important that the recommendations in this book are used in conjunction with a comprehensive holistic treatment plan, which includes lifestyle and dietary modifications, along with the vitamin and other treatments. To help you prioritize your symptoms and then implement treatments, I have created a step-by-step approach—the Prousky Plan—to assist you. This approach has been successfully used with many of my CFS patients. It should allow you to more effectively and precisely treat your own symptoms and overcome chronic fatigue.

The Prousky Plan

Step One: Incorporate many of the suggestions in Chapter 2: Lifestyle Modifications. These will help you create a more balanced life, and teach you to “pace” yourself in your daily activities. Pay special attention to the type and intensity of regular exercise and look for ways to make your home more ergonomically sound.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781591202684

CHAPTER 9: Treating Red Blood Cell Abnormalities and Oxidative Stress

Prousky M.Sc. N.D., Jonathan E. Basic Health Publications ePub

The relationship between impaired microcirculatory blood flow and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a neglected area of inquiry. Normal tissue function depends on an adequate supply of oxygen and metabolic substrates, which is only possible in the presence of normal capillary blood flow. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood to the tissues of the body. Since many of the smaller capillaries in the human body have diameters that are more narrow than the diameters of red blood cells (RBCs), adequate perfusion of bodily tissues depends on the ability of RBCs to change from their normal discocyte shape (a process called deformation) so that they can readily traverse (enter into) the capillaries.1

Numerous studies have evaluated microcirculatory blood flow and/or RBC deformability in subjects with chronic fatigue. In a study comparing blood filterability, samples of blood from acutely unwell CFS subjects were shown to be less filterable than blood from similarly aged blood donors.2 These subjects had prolonged blood filtration times that normalized to that of the aged blood donors once their acute illnesses had passed. Based on these findings, the investigators concluded that the numerous symptoms of chronic fatigue might result from impaired microcirculatory blood flow. A 1987 report discovered abnormal RBC shape changes among chronic fatigue patients in a state of relapse.3 The cell membranes of the altered RBCs were thought to be more rigid, thus impairing the delivery of oxygen and other nutrient materials.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781591202684

CHAPTER 1: What Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Prousky M.Sc. N.D., Jonathan E. Basic Health Publications ePub

In the autumn of 1984, in Incline Village, Nevada, local physicians Paul Cheney and Daniel Peterson documented the first cluster of approximately 200 people who became ill with a prolonged flu-like illness. They were perplexed because all of their patients had similar unexplained symptoms, including high levels of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in their blood. This mysterious syndrome was referred to as chronic Epstein-Barr virus (CEBV). About a year later, a second cluster of similar flu-like symptoms appeared in Lyndonville, New York, but this time it primarily affected children and adolescents. The media became interested in these phenomena, and soon after there were sporadic reports of similar flu-like illnesses across the United States.1

Sometime during the 1980s, CEBV was nicknamed the “yuppie flu” because it was believed to primarily affect affluent, young professionals. This is completely untrue since the majority of people having the illness are between forty and fifty-nine years of age and are mostly lower-income as opposed to high-income earners. Eventually, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) became involved and named the illness chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and they also created a U.S. case definition for diagnosis in 1988.2

See All Chapters
Medium 9781591202684

CHAPTER 5: A Detoxification Program for Chronic Fatigue

Prousky M.Sc. N.D., Jonathan E. Basic Health Publications ePub

Earlier in this book, research was presented about the relationship between toxic agents and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). It is well known that exposure to toxins can produce an illness that would be clinically indistinguishable from CFS. The most implicated toxins are the organochlorine and organophosphate chemicals that have widespread use in both domestic and industrial settings, in items such as insecticides and pesticides. People with CFS who believe they are toxic can usually recall an event or exposure that seemed to trigger the onset of their illness. They might have lived near a golf course, where the spraying of pesticides is common practice, or perhaps they grew up on a farm where chemicals were needed to spare the crops from pest destruction. Some may believe that environmental toxic exposures created their illness, and they are probably correct, since they can pinpoint the exact time and place when the exposures occurred and when their symptoms began.

For environmentally toxic CFS sufferers, a detoxification program should be instituted immediately so that fat-soluble toxins can be safely and effectively eliminated from the body. Detoxification is the body’s ability to transform a fat-soluble compound into a water-soluble compound so that it can be eliminated.1 Although the urinary route of excretion actively removes transformed fat-soluble compounds, it is not always an effective avenue of elimination. Fat-soluble toxins can persist for years or even decades because they were never effectively removed from the body. People with chronic fatigue can have excessive amounts of fat-soluble organochlorine and organophosphate compounds that continue to wreak havoc since they remain imbedded in tissues, particularly fat, and in organs such as the liver, kidneys, and even the brain.2

See All Chapters
Medium 9781591202684

CHAPTER 8: Alleviating Muscular Dysfunction

Prousky M.Sc. N.D., Jonathan E. Basic Health Publications ePub

People with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) typically complain of muscle aches and pains (referred to as myalgias in the medical literature), as well as muscular fatigue and weakness. Since muscular dysfunction is such a common problem among many with CFS, natural treatments should be instituted to not only reduce muscle pain but to also increase the ability to perform daily activities, such as walking, completing household chores, and simply moving around. Carrying out these common activities depends on a normal and healthy muscular system.

Research confirms the likely relationship between chronic fatigue and muscular dysfunction. One CFS case documented early intracellular acidosis (a state in which there is not enough oxygen) following moderate exercise.1 Another, decades-old study evaluated clinical, pathological, electrophysiological, immunological, and virological abnormalities in fifty patients with postviral fatigue syndrome.2 Many of the patients demonstrated prolonged weakness in several bodily areas (arms and legs) following specific exercises. Muscle biopsies were performed on twenty of the patients and the results demonstrated necrosis (death) in many muscle fibers, as well as evidence of early intracellular acidosis. A more recent study found an increased amount of oxidative stress and marked alterations of muscle function among chronic fatigue patients who were subjected to incremental exercise.3

See All Chapters

See All Chapters