68 Slices
Medium 9781780490816

CHAPTER NINE The facilitating silence

Maria Pozzi Monzo Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER NINE

The facilitating silence

Dialogue with Sara Leon

Be the change that you wish to see in the world.

—Mahatma Gandhi

mp:

sl:

Well, this interview has to take place on the phone unfortunately but I hope we can meet later on and perhaps go to Amaravati

Buddhist Monastery together at some point.

Yes, that would be interesting for me.

mp:

I’d like to begin by asking you when you started to be interested in Buddhism, unless you come from that family background and were brought up as such. Also how did the two choices of Buddhism and being a child psychotherapist come about for you?

sl:

It must have been thirty years ago, a long time ago that I started with yoga. I lived in Germany at the time. I first became interested in yoga which in retrospect felt like psychoanalysis of the body.

This lead to an interest in meditation, in Eastern philosophies and religions.

mp:

Where you in Germany with your family?

109

See All Chapters
Medium 9781780490816

CHAPTER THREE The Buddha in the sky

Maria Pozzi Monzo Karnac Books PDF

CHAPTER THREE

The Buddha in the sky

Dialogue with Stephen Malloch

Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anaemic.

—Martin Luther King, Jr.

mp:

Well, this is really extraordinary for me: to have this dialogue across oceans and continents via Skype! Yes, Stephen, I can see you in your house in Sydney while I am based in the room you used when you stayed with us in London some years ago on the occasion of your book launch. Well, I would like to focus on the aspect of your working life related to your research in musicality in mother/father–baby communication and ask you how you integrate your Buddhist self into such research. To begin with, could you tell me when you first became interested in Buddhism and in researching the musicality in mother baby interactions?

sm:

I came upon Buddhism first of all when I was living in Cambridge and I was studying for my Master’s in music theory and analysis at the University of London. I was living in Cambridge with my first wife and she started going along to a group called Friends of

29

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855754584

3: Multidisciplinary early intervention with infants and young children presenting emotional, physical and speech difficulties

Maria Pozzi Monzo Karnac Books ePub

C. Bernasconi, D. Gilardoni, M.E. Pozzi, and M.L. Terragni

This chapter owes its existence to some of the members of the workshop entitled “Zero to Five”. This is part of the Italian-Swiss Association “Zero-Cinque”. A small group of Swiss and Italian professionals from various disciplines, working with infants, small children, and their families, gathered together several years ago to address their growing concern regarding the age group neonate to five years old. Psychopathology among infants and young children was increasing in an alarming way; families and professionals were respectively, needing help, and needing to know more about this age group and what to offer these families in trouble. A monthly multidisciplinary workshop “Zero to Five” was then set up, led by Pagliarani and Pozzi, a child and adult psychoanalyst and psychotherapist respectively. They met to discuss worrying situations encountered by the multi-professional members, and to read about and to deepen their understanding of early infancy and parenthood. Amongst the participants there were child psychiatrists and paediatricians, child psychologists and psychotherapists, occupational, speech and language therapists, nursery teachers, and paedi-atric nurses. All the participants, as well as having years of experience in their respective professional fields with children, had undertaken infant observation based on Esther Bick’s methodology, as well as individual psychotherapy or psychoanalysis. In October 2004 the Associazione Insubrica Zerocinque (the Zero-Five’s Centre for Insubria) was legally founded in Vacallo, in the Canton Ticino, where the workshop had been taking place. This offered a more formalized structure for training professionals in counselling infants, small children, and their families. (Insubria is an Italian-Swiss region that includes the Italian cities of Como, Varese, Lugano, and the Swiss Canton Ticino.)

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855759077

CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Under fives’ counselling as a form of assessment

Maria Pozzi Monzo Karnac Books ePub

“The encounter with what is not known is at the heart of
assessment”

Rustin & Quagliata, 2000

Introduction on assessment

I found the above statement by Margaret Rustin interesting when considering the general introduction on assessment. When a child and his or her family come to a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service with symptomatic behaviour, unhappiness and disturbance, we are dealing with something that is not known to them. What is not yet known, I would like to stress, is something unconscious, buried within the child’s or family’s mind and which will, hopefully, begin to be known and made conscious during the assessment and in the following therapeutic work. The father of a one-year-old boy comes to mind. He asked for help to manage his aggressive and out-of-character feelings towards the baby, the second child in a happy, insightful family of professional parents. In the first session of under fives’ counselling, what became apparent was his new awareness of being stuck in an identification with his older son, due to unresolved sibling rivalry. Having been the only and cherished child in his family of origin, he had never dealt with issues of sibling rivalry. When their second baby was born, he could not deal with his feelings towards the baby and was overwhelmed by dislike and rage, thus losing his parental perspective entirely. His new knowledge of his unconscious feelings, which occurred in that first session, brought resolution of this conflict, which at a six-month follow-up had been maintained.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855759077

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Mental illness in the family

Maria Pozzi Monzo Karnac Books ePub

Introduction

The family I write about here was described in a paper in the Journal of Child Psychotherapy (Pozzi, 1999). They had caused some concern to the local services due to mother’s disturbance, for which she was known to the local Adult Mental Health Service. Her daughter, the only child in this family, had been only mildly affected by her mother’s illness due to her father’s presence and care, which had provided her with relative stability. However, this child and her parents had experienced prolonged difficulties, which could be resolved fairly satisfactorily by the under fives’ counselling offered and did not necessitate a psychotherapy treatment for the child alone.

Bonny1

The health visitor referred this family because of four-year-old Bonny’s uncontrollable behaviour. She was not responding to the usual behavioural modification techniques suggested to, and implemented by, the parents. In a telephone conversation with the health visitor, I had learnt that father was rather worried about mother’s inability to cope with Bonny, that the parents were not working together and that mother had had violent outbursts, but she had never hit Bonny. When I telephoned the family, father told me that the nursery teacher, as well as his wife, had difficulties in coping with Bonny. He believed that Bonny was a hyperactive child. I had the impression that he was very preoccupied by both an uncontrollable and challenging child, who had disturbed sleep and was leading younger children into trouble at school, and by his wife who was just pregnant and unable to cope with Bonny. I could detect urgency and almost panic in his voice. Therefore, I decided to prioritize this family and to offer an early appointment with my social worker colleague and myself. The latter had wanted to join me in an under fives’ family work to learn about the approach used: we had already co-worked with families creatively, complementing each other’s different approaches.

See All Chapters

See All Slices