53 Slices
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Taneytown

Norman Renouf Hunter Publishing ePub

An Enchanting Inn May Put Love on Track

This local inn is one of the most enchanting and romantic places we've seen. Without doubt, it is worthy of a visit; even if your only outside activity is a stroll around town.

Antrim 1844 - An Antebellum Country Inn is at 30 Trevanion Road, just off Route 140 (East Baltimore Street) and a few hundred yards east of Taneytown. It is easy to miss, but if you can locate the Taneytown Bank & Trust, at the junction of Route 140 and Trevanion, you'll be warm. (The entrance to Antrim is just to the rear.) At first glance, the environment seems rather ordinary, but don't be fooled. As soon as you pull into the drive, you'll realize it's far from that. This magnificent three-story square mansion is distinguished by majestic porticoed entrances, as well as a smaller two-level addition on one side.

Antrim 1844

Once inside, you're transported back - in the twinkling of an eye - to a time of genteel grace and elegance. This inn has an authentic mid-19th century ambience that tends toward the formal. Yet it is not at all pretentious. The hosts' southern hospitality will put you right at ease, setting the tone for what will prove a relaxing weekend. Your key will be waiting for you by the door, accompanied by a hand-written card bearing your name.

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Medium 9780935161670

Ribe

Norman Renouf Hunter Publishing ePub

Copenhagen & the Best of Denmark

2nd Edition

 

Norman P.T. Renouf

 

Hunter Publishing, Inc.

 Hunter Publishing, Inc.

2012

 

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the written permission of the publisher.

This guide focuses on recreational activities. As all such activities contain elements of risk, the publisher, author, affiliated individuals and companies disclaim any responsibility for any injury, harm, or illness that may occur to anyone through, or by use of, the information in this book. Every effort was made to insure the accuracy of information in this book, but the publisher and author do not assume, and hereby disclaim, any liability for loss or damage caused by errors, omissions, misleading information or potential travel problems caused by this guide, even if such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause.

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Abingdon

Norman Renouf Hunter Publishing ePub

Where Country Meets Culture

In the southwest corner of Virginia, surrounded by majestic mountains, is a very special town. The oldest settlement west of the Blue Ridge Mountains, it is rich in tradition. But it's also a cultural center.

Back in 1749-1750, King George II granted Dr. Thomas Walker over 6,000 acres of land in what is now southwest Virginia. He eventually sold some of this land to Joseph Black, who built a small fort known as Black's Fort. In 1760, on his first trip to Kentucky, Daniel Boone pitched camp at the base of a hill here. During the night his dogs were attacked by wolves that emerged from a nearby cave. Thereafter, the spot was known as Wolf Hill.

The area originally enjoyed a period of peace between the Indians and the settlers. But in 1776, a Cherokee uprising sent many to the fort, which was subsequently enlarged. Later that year the Virginia Assembly created Washington County; Black's Fort was designated the meeting place of the first county court. Dr. Walker, Joseph Black, and a certain Samuel Briggs then donated 120 acres to establish a town. In 1778, the Virginia Assembly passed an act that made the new town, Abingdon, the first English-speaking settlement incorporated in the Mississippi watershed. Although the first structures were built of logs, frame buildings with rock foundations sprouted up within a few years, with the first brick house appearing in 1803. Abingdon grew to be the most important town in western Virginia; it was a staging point for mail as well as supplies for those settlers opening up the wilderness to the west. Although major fires in 1812, 1856, and 1864 destroyed many of the buildings, enough original structures remain for the town to be designated a Virginia Historic Landmark.

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Hanover County

Norman Renouf Hunter Publishing ePub

A Railroad Town Sets the Stage for Romance

Located about 15 miles north of Richmond and 85 miles south of Washington, DC is a county both rich in history and typically Virginian.

The history of this area's original inhabitants is recalled by the Pamunkey River on the county's northern boundary. It was named for the Indians who still maintain a reservation on the lower part of the river in neighboring King William County. In the late 17th century, English colonists patented this land and developed warehouses here to house the area's tobacco crop. During the 18th century, Hanover County was at the very center of Virginia's "Great Awakening," which was led by the Reverend Samuel Davies, founder of the Hanover Presbytery. During this period - in 1749, to be exact - Newcastle was incorporated as Hanover's first town. (It only narrowly missed becoming the state capital!) The county was also the birthplace of two great orators - Patrick Henry and William Clay - both of whom who helped shape this country's early history. Hanover's strategic location just north of Richmond made it the site of numerous battles and skirmishes during the Civil War. After that, the residents settled down to a quiet, rural life - until the coming of the railroad.

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Tilghman Island

Norman Renouf Hunter Publishing ePub

Approximately 11 miles from St. Michaels, along Route 33, you will come across unspoiled little Tilghman Island (www.tilghmanisland.com). First charted by John Smith as early as 1608, it wasn't until 1775 that it was named in honor of its then-owner, Matthew Tilghman. It sits at the northern entrance to the Chesapeake Bay's largest river, the Choptank, and just off the southern end of the Bay Hundred Peninsula. The name "Bay Hundred" originates from the early division of Maryland into "hundreds," a practice dating to Anglo-Saxon times. The island is today, as it was then, inhabited by fewer than 700 people. Many of these make the Chesapeake Bay seafood business their livelihood. Tilghman's future seemed uncertain after it suffered costly losses of resources and property at the hands of the British in the War of 1812. In 1890, however, a steamboat service was established here; it lasted well into this century. This leisurely and efficient means of access opened the island to vacationers, who were lured by its superb fishing and genteel accommodations. In those days, travelers were escorted to and from their destination by horse- or ox-drawn vehicles. Today, Tilghman is reached via a drawbridge. But once over it, little else has changed. You'll be greeted with a quiet, warm hospitality that has become the island's trademark. One main road runs from north to south over the three-mile length of the island; other roads feed off it, taking you to the waterside or other points of interest. Accommodations are available, the details of which follow; but even if you decide not to stay on the island, it deserves a visit.

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