18 Chapters
Medium 9781574414653

Photo Gallery

Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

Photo Gallery

Rangers and Popular Images

But one thing seems clear to everyone who returns from field work: other people are other. They do not think the way we do. And if we want to understand their way of thinking, we should set out with the idea of capturing otherness.

—Robert Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre and

Other Episodes in French Cultural History.

Some Lone Star scholars insist that Texas, with its heritage of slavery, segregation, and historic dependence upon cotton, is southern. Another group of historians argue that Texas is western, as evidenced by its cowboys, cattle drives, mountains, and desert. Still others say that the Lone Star State is unique, winning its independence from

Mexico during the Texas Revolution and existing as an independent republic for ten years prior to joining the Union.

—Glen Sample Ely, Where the West

Begins: Debating Texas Identity.

He must have courage equal to any, judgment better than most, and physical strength to outlast his men on the longest march or hardest ride.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414653

Rangers, “Rip” Ford, and the Cortina War

Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

8

Rangers, “Rip” Ford, and the Cortina War

Richard B. McCaslin

T

he greatest border challenge for newly elected Texas Governor

Sam Houston came on the Rio Grande, when Juan N. Cortina, a rancher and accused cattle rustler who was a folk hero to some local Tejanos, shot the Brownsville marshal and fled into Mexico.

Cortina returned to occupy Brownsville with a small force in September 1859, intending to murder those who had secured an indictment against him. He and his followers did kill several people before Jose Maria de Jesus Carvajal, the commander of the garrison in

Matamoros, convinced his cousin Cortina to stop. Cortina retired to

Rancho del Carmen, his mother’s ranch upriver, where he gathered more men by declaring that he would fight for the rights of Mexican

Texans. The federal units at Brownsville and other posts along the lower Rio Grande had been removed due to the relative peace that had fallen over the region, as well as a general decline in the town after the creation of a free trade zone in northern Mexico, so Brownsville militia had to battle with Cortina’s men. Cortina could not take

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414653

The Texas Rangers Revisited: Old Themes and New Viewpoints

Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

The Texas Rangers Revisited: Old Themes and New Viewpoints

★ 25

ther gave nor asked for quarter; and were an irregular force with no uniforms, some privately supplied equipment and provisions, and a noticeable lack of military discipline. This rough-and-ready image, which first appeared in the fight for Texan independence and the

Mexican War, left its imprint on the imagination of those writers who have recorded the exploits of outlaws and lawmen.

Although tradition played an important part in Ranger affairs, different eras in Texas history produced different types of Rangers.

Through the decades of settlement, revolution, and statehood; the period of the Civil War and Reconstruction; the growth of agriculture and industry; the rise of urban Texas; and American involvement in two world wars, the operations of the Texas Rangers can be divided into three distinct periods:

1. 1823–1874: the heyday of the Rangers as citizen soldiers.

Within this time frame ranging companies and other volunteer units engaged in a military struggle with Indian tribes and Mexicans for control of the land.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414653

The Jesse Evans Gang and the Death of Texas Ranger George R. Bingham

Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

14

The Jesse Evans Gang and the Death of Texas Ranger

George R. Bingham

Chuck Parsons

The other three desperadoes were captured and lodged in jail at

Fort Davis. Among those captured is Jesse Evans, one of the most notorious highwaymen now living. He operated in Colorado and

New Mexico, and was known by all as a brave, daring robber, who defied the officers and took possession of whole towns when it suited his purpose. This was his first trip to Texas, and to be gobbled up by Gen. Jones’ men, has no doubt disgusted him with

Texas in general and the alert wide-awake Texas rangers in general.1

W

estern buffs readily recognize Jesse Evans, the desperado whose name will be forever linked with that of Billy the Kid.

Virtually every book dealing with the Kid devotes some space to Evans. We are concerned here not only with the Texas crimes of Jesse Evans, but also the man whose death placed him behind the unforgiving walls of Huntsville State Prison: George R.

Bingham, a Texas Ranger of Company D, Frontier Battalion, who was killed in action.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414653

The Deadly Colts on Walker’s Creek

Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

4

The Deadly Colts on

Walker’s Creek

Stephen L. Moore

T

he key Indian agent in Texas from the U.S., Pierce Butler, had more resources and thus more negotiating power than Sam

Houston’s appointed agents. He found the Indians receptive when he called for a meeting of all Plains Indians to be held at

Cache Creek of the Red River in December 1843. Butler arrived with an escort of 30 U.S. dragoons and a large store of gifts.1

Butler spent 18 days with the Comanches and their associate tribes speaking of peace. He advised his superiors that the Indians would eventually need help in surviving as game became more scarce for hunting and the better farmlands were taken over by the

Anglo Texas settlers, Butler took great interest in documenting the demographics of the Indian tribes he met with. In his report of January 31, 1844, Butler counted 1,500 people in the two main Wichita towns on the upper Trinity River. He found that another 500 or

600 lived in two Wichita communities near the Wichita mountains.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters