27 Chapters
Medium 9781574411973

A POW in Vietnam: “Smart People, Dumb War”

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

BRIGADIER GENERAL DAVID W. WINN, USAF (RET.)

A POW IN VIETNAM:

“SMART PEOPLE,

DUMB WAR”

Born in Austin, Minnesota, July 20, 1923, David Winn entered the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II and earned his wings and commission as a 2nd lieutenant pilot in

February 1943. He served in North Africa, Sardinia, and Italy during the war. In 1948 he separated from the Air Force.

Recalled to active duty for the Korean War, Winn chose to make the Air Force a career and subsequently served in

Germany, Thailand, Canada, and the United Kingdom as an exchange officer with the RAF. U.S. assignments included duty in Texas, Arizona, Michigan, Colorado, Minnesota, and

Washington, DC. He saw staff duty at the Pentagon with the

Joint Chiefs of Staff. A graduate of the University of Minnesota, he later earned a master’s degree in international relations from George Washington University. He also is a graduate of the National War College.

While on a combat mission in a F-105 out of a base in

Thailand, Winn was shot down over North Vietnam and captured in August 1968. He was a prisoner of war in Hanoi until his release in 1973. As one of the senior POWs, he played an important role in establishing camp policies and conduct

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Ending the War with Japan: The Decision to Use the Atomic Bombs

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

DR. ROBERT A. DIVINE (UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS)

ENDING THE WAR

WITH JAPAN:

THE DECISION TO USE

THE ATOMIC BOMBS

Robert A. Divine, George W. Littlefield Professor Emeritus in American History at the University of Texas at Austin, received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1954. A specialist in American diplomatic history, he taught from 1954 to 1996 at the University of Texas, where both the Student Association and the Graduate School honored him for teaching excellence.

His extensive works include The Illusion of Neutrality

(1962); The Reluctant Belligerent (1965); Second Chance: The

Triumph of Internationalism in America During World War

II; and Blowing in the Wind (1978). His most recent work is Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace (2000), a comparative analysis of twentieth-century American wars. He is also the author of Eisenhower and the Cold War (1981) and editor of three volumes of essays on the presidency of Lyndon B.

Johnson. His book, The Sputnik Challenge (1992), won the

Eugene E. Emme Astronautical Literature Award for 1993.

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Foreshadowing Postwar Iraq: The U.S. War in the Philippines, 1899–1902

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

DR. BRIAN LINN (TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY)

FORESHADOWING THE

WAR IN IRAQ: THE U.S.

WAR IN THE PHILIPPINES,

1899–1902

Dr. Brian Linn is currently professor of history at Texas A&M

University. He is perhaps the foremost authority in the United States concerning the American military experience in the

Pacific in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War.

Dr. Linn received his Ph.D at The Ohio State University in 1985 and has been a member of the Department of History at Texas A&M since 1989. In 2000 he published The Philippine War, 1899–1902 (University Press of Kansas), which was a selection of the History Book Club in 2000 and winner of the Society of Military History’s Distinguished Book Prize in 2001. In 1997, he published Guardians of Empire: The U.S.

Army in the Pacific, 1902–1940 (University of North Carolina

Press). This book also was a History Book Club selection in

1997 and winner of both the Society of Military History’s

Distinguished Book Prize in 1998 and the Army Historical

Foundation’s Distinguished Book Award in 1997. In 1989 he published The U.S. Army and Counterinsurgency in the Philippine War (University of North Carolina Press). In addition to the monographs, he has published sixteen articles and book chapters as well as numerous essays, encyclopedia entries,

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Life in the Bloody 100th

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

MAJOR JOHN LUCKADOO, USAAF (RET.)

LIFE IN THE

BLOODY 100th

Born in 1922 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, John Luckadoo enlisted in the Aviation Cadet Program of the U.S. Army Air

Forces in February 1942. Immediately after graduating as a multi-engine pilot in February 1943, he was assigned to the

100th Bomb Group (Heavy) flying B-17s. Luckadoo later flew overseas to England with his group to enter combat with the

8th Air Force.

Luckadoo’s fate was to serve as a member of an air group that became known as “The Bloody 100th.” Operating from an airfield near the English village of Thorpe Abbotts, the

100th flew a total of 306 combat missions between June

25, 1943, and April 20, 1945. During that time the 100th had lost 177 aircraft in combat and another 52 planes to operational accidents. The 100th was not the group with the highest losses in the 8th Air Force, but since its early losses often came in bunches, it soon acquired the reputation of a hard luck outfit along with the name “The Bloody 100th.”

It lost nine crews on the Regensburg-to-Africa shuttle in August 1943; seven over Bremen on October 8, 1943; twelve over Münster on October 10, 1943; fifteen over

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Medium 9781574411973

B

Edited by Peter B. Lane and Ronald E. Marcello University of North Texas Press PDF

Index

American Caesar, 133

American casualties, 263

American defense attaché, 212; responsibilities, 212–13, 218–

19; “Four Bs,” 215–18; Soviet aircraft, 218; assessment of

Red Army, 225–26

American productive capacity, 31

Amon Carter Foundation, vi

Anatahan Island, 72

Antonov AN-24, 218

Appleton, Roy, 47-50

Arab-Israeli conflict, 243

Arafat, Yasir, 235

Area Studies Program (U.S.

Army), 221

Army Group Don (German), 1920

Army Group North Ukraine

(German), 23

Army Group South (German), 10,

17, 19

Army Group South Ukraine and

Romania (German), 23

Aspin, Les, 123n15

Assassins, 232–34 assessment of LBJ’s leadership as war president, 187–89

Atom bomb, use of, 79; revisionist historians, 99

Atomic bomb, top-secret development. 96

Atta, Muhammad, 239–40

Ataturk, Mustafa Kemel, 234, 241

Atterbury, Edwin, 200n18,

204n21 attitudes toward military, 180–81

Aviation Cadet Program, 31

Axis Sally, 37

B

B-17, 33; losses, 38

B-29s, 62; (Super Fortress) specifications, characteristics,

66; North Korean operations,

140

B-47, 113

B-52, 113

Bader-Meinhoff Gang, 230

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