43 Chapters
Medium 9781574414233

Chapter 3—The New School

Tom Killebrew University of North Texas Press ePub

C HAPTER 3

THE NEW SCHOOL

As soon as Major Long and Terrell city officials signed the agreement on June 14, 1941, construction of the airport got underway. At the same time, Terrell citizens launched a vigorous campaign to ensure passage of the countywide bond election to be held on June 28. More than one hundred Terrell volunteers canvassed the county speaking to various groups.

Airport supporters presented a two-pronged message: support of the airport would be good economically and would also be patriotic. The headline of one full-page newspaper advertisement asked, “Is Your Son’s Life Worth 16 Cents a Year?” The ad went on, “Can you deny the vital importance of training British RAF flyers on U.S. soil in Kaufman County as a step toward keeping your own son far from war-torn bomb-shattered lands?” and “Can any red-blooded citizen of Kaufman County afford to ignore even the smallest opportunity to insure our American way of life?”1 At a mass meeting, Kaufman mayor Emmett Day commented, “In times like these we must forget petty differences and unite in this nation-wide, democracy-wide undertaking.”2

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Medium 9781574416244

Chapter 3: Royal Air Force Delegation

Tom Killebrew UNT Press PDF

Chapter 3

Royal Air Force Delegation

Air Ministry officials realized that the sheer magnitude of the proposed training schemes in the United States would require considerable coordination and liaison between British and American military commands, as well as a close working relationship with the individual civilian school operators. Besides the obvious need for training supervision, accounting personnel would need to be involved due to the financial aspects of the new training programs and the complexities associated with payments to the civilian schools. Detailed records would be necessary to account for Crown funds as opposed to lend-lease expenditures. Many decisions would require approval by the British Treasury. Consideration had to be given to the maintenance of personnel records and the issuance of the necessary movement orders for the British students training in the

United States, as well as the RAF officers assigned to the various schools.

The work load required by these tasks far surpassed the capacity of the limited staff of the air attache at the British Embassy and the tasks were not compatible with the British Purchasing Commission or

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Medium 9781574414233

Appendix A List of Fatalities

Tom Killebrew University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414233

Chapter 3 The New School

Tom Killebrew University of North Texas Press PDF

The New School

Chapter 3

As soon as Major Long and Terrell city officials signed the agreement on June 14, 1941, construction of the airport got underway. At the same time,

Terrell citizens launched a vigorous campaign to ensure passage of the countywide bond election to be held on June 28. More than one hundred Terrell volunteers canvassed the county speaking to various groups.

Airport supporters presented a two-pronged message: support of the airport would be good economically and would also be patriotic. The headline of one full-page newspaper advertisement asked, “Is Your Son’s Life Worth 16 Cents a Year?”

The ad went on, “Can you deny the vital importance of training British RAF flyers on U.S. soil in Kaufman

County as a step toward keeping your own son far from war-torn bomb-shattered lands?” and “Can any red-blooded citizen of Kaufman County afford to ignore even the smallest opportunity to insure our

American way of life?”1 At a mass meeting, Kaufman mayor Emmett Day commented, “In times like these we must forget petty differences and unite in this nation-wide, democracy-wide undertaking.”2

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Medium 9781574416152

1. Overseas Training

Tom Killebrew UNT Press ePub

Chapter 1

Even before the beginning of World War II, British Air Ministry officials, drawing on the flight training experiences of World War I, recognized the need to move some aircrew training out of Great Britain in the event of war. Drawbacks to flight training in Britain during wartime included the limited size of the country, an urgent need for airfield and support facilities for operational squadrons, the often abysmal weather, and the very real possibility of enemy attack.1

In spite of the advantages of moving some flight training to Commonwealth countries, officials also recognized several drawbacks to any overseas training plan. The distances involved were in many cases daunting, literally involving potential locations on the other side of the world. Another concern involved dealing with other governments.

Initial discussions with Commonwealth governments before the war concerning aircrew training produced mixed results. Australia, New Zealand, Kenya, and Southern Rhodesia responded quickly and favorably. Other Commonwealth nations were agreeable. Even with the favorable responses, the extreme distances flight students would have to travel to and from training sites and the associated supply and support problems would be sizable. The political climate in South Africa, not always friendly to Great Britain, precluded negotiations with that country. Even in the best of political climes, the sheer distance between South Africa and Great Britain, along with primitive conditions and limited facilities in much of the country presented considerable disadvantages to training at the bottom of Africa.

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