10 Chapters
Medium 9781574411515

2 “The Light Crust Doughboys are on the “The Light Crust Doughboys are on the air!”

John Mark Dempsey University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER TWO

to sell himself to voters. The Doughboys embodied the very essence of the “golden era” of radio—live performances, the dominance of programming by advertising agencies, union disputes over the broadcasting of recorded music, and, finally, the decline of network radio programming with the emergence of television. And so it is ironic that one of the giant figures in television history has a role in the Doughboys’ story.

Over and over, the young University of Texas journalism student practiced the Doughboys’ signature greeting, to the point that his fraternity brothers were ready to toss him out of the house. The inflection of “Yahoo!” had to be just right. This was his big chance.

The hugely popular Doughboys, making one of their many tours of the state, were coming to Austin for a live broadcast from the KTUT studios, and they needed an announcer to open the show. The young broadcaster had a part-time job announcing the sports news on

Austin station KTUT, but this would let him show off his announcing skill to a much larger audience on the far-flung Texas Quality

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411515

Appendix 2 Light Crust Doughboys Discography, 1969–present

John Mark Dempsey University of North Texas Press PDF

L I G H T C R U S T D O U G H B O Y S D I S C O G R A P H Y , 1969– P R E S E N T

Appendix 2

Light Crust Doughboys Discography,

1969–present

We’re the Light Crust Doughboys from Burrus Mills

Producer: Smokey Montgomery

Light Crust Doughboys Theme: Jack Perry (Walter Hailey)

Double Eagle/Wildwood Flower

The Leaf of Love

Hear Dem Bells

Red River Valley/Yellow Rose of Texas/Beautiful Texas

Kelly Waltz/Good Night Waltz

A Fool such as I

Old Joe Clark

Beer Barrel Polka

A Petal from a Faded Rose

Tennessee Wagoner

My Best to You

I Really Don’t Want to Know

San Antonio Rose

When It’s Roundup Time in Heaven

Light Crust Doughboys Theme: Jack Perry

Date: 1969

The Light Crust Doughboys Religious Memories

Producer: Smokey Montgomery

Date: 1979

Theme: Guide and Keep Us

Turn Your Radio On

Medley: (a) It Is No Secret (b) The Old Rugged Cross (c) Take My Hand

Precious Lord (d) Amazing Grace

Lord, Take All of Me

How Great Thou Art

I’ll Fly Away

Just a Closer Walk with Thee

In the Garden

The Last Roundup

Medley: (a) Church in the Wildwood (b) the Lily of the Valley (c) When the

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411515

photo gallery

John Mark Dempsey University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574411515

3 “If you take Marvin, I’ll break up the “If you take Marvin, I’ll break up the band!”

John Mark Dempsey University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER THREE

Mill kept the band going, long after the company sent O’Daniel packing.

In fact, it may be argued, the Doughboys enjoyed their greatest popularity without Wills, Brown, and O’Daniel. Many band members would come and go in the years and decades to come. They would create their own Doughboys legacy, in much the same way that new generations of athletes have added to the heritage of the

New York Yankees or the Dallas Cowboys.

It was radio’s “golden age.” The Light Crust Doughboys would ride the crest of the wave that carried radio to the apex of its cultural importance in the heady years after World War II. But then that wave came crashing down, taking the Doughboys and many other radio stars with it. Almost overnight, television replaced radio in the nation’s living rooms.

To understand the steadily growing popularity of the Doughboys, even after the departure of seemingly indispensable members of the group, remember that many parts of rural Texas in the early 1930s were, in effect, still mired in the 19th century. And so, while the

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411515

5 “I’m going back to work for the “I’m going back to work for the Doughboys”

John Mark Dempsey University of North Texas Press PDF

“I’M GOING BACK

TO

WORK

FOR THE

DOUGHBOYS”

moted the return of the Light Crust Doughboys.

The influx of people from the countryside influenced the programming on Dallas-area radio stations, and also paved the way for the return of the Doughboys. The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area became a country music hotbed. WFAA and KRLD radio carried live country music programs that featured local, regional, and national performers. The Big D Jamboree, held in a large barn of a building called the Sportatorium on the edge of downtown Dallas, attracted some of the best-known names in country music and drew crowds of

4,000 people each Saturday night (Govenar and Brakefield, 161).

The war had brought a temporary end to the Light Crust

Doughboys, but some members of the group continued to play together. Announcer Parker Willson got a job with the Duncan Coffee

Company and hired several members of the Doughboys to play on a radio program as the “Coffee Grinders” from September 1942 to

April 1946. Kenneth Pitts, Zeke Campbell, Cecil Brower, and J.B.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters