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Chapter 11 Epilogue

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Chapter 11

Epilogue

★★★

“I want to be at home where I can get a good water to drink and milk and butter to eat and clean clothes to

[wear] and where I can go to church on Sunday.”1

—Pvt. Lorenzo Dow Fulton, Company D, 13th Texas

Unlike their friends and brothers who served east of the Mississippi, the soldiers of the 13th Texas Cavalry suffered no serious defeat in battle and were never disarmed. Most were paroled only as Union occupation forces moved through their home counties. Some, like Capt.

Charles H. Jones of Tyler County, probably delayed their personal surrender until it was discovered that he could not vote or run for office without it.2 Capt. William D. Wood of Gould’s 6th Cavalry Battalion related that rather than returning to the Yankees the famous guns of the

“Val Verde” Battery, captured in New Mexico, they were dismounted and buried by Captain Nettles and his men near Fairfield in Freestone

County, Texas.3 The average enlisted soldiers, like Privates Milton P.

Gaines or Lorenzo D. Fulton of Anderson County, had little interest in anything beyond their families, homes, and farms. The coming of peace and their return to Texas answered nearly every prayer they had written during the three years of war.4

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Chapter 3 From Red River to White River

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Chapter 3

From Red River to White River

★★★

“We was compelled to take it afoot.”

— Pvt. Thomas Rounsaville1

Leaving Camp McCulloch on July 2, the 13th Cavalry traveled through Gilmer in Upshur County and spent the Fourth of July in camp four miles north of Coffeeville on Cypress Bayou. By July 8, the regiment had passed Hickory Hill and Linden in Cass County on the way to the Texas state line. The weather was hot, but not excessively so. In the afternoons, breaks were called every hour or so, to take advantage of roadside shade. Capt. William Blewett of Company

H wrote,

Several of the boys are complaining but all of them are able to ride . . . we are traveling from fifteen to twenty miles a day which will reduce our horses but very little. So far we have found plenty of corn but the probability is that in some places between this and Little Rock we will be scarce. Our stock are generally in fine order at this time and the only difficulty now is to get them shod, a great many of them being tender footed and the roads are rocky and very rough.2

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Appendix B: Organization of Walker’s Division, April 1864

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Chapter 8 The Battle of Pleasant Hill

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Chapter 8

The Battle of Pleasant Hill

★★★

“His loss is lamented by the Regiment more than any man that has fallen.”

—Capt. James B. Rounsaville, Company E,

13th Texas Cavalry.1

The losses to the 13th Texas had been significant at Mansfield. If the experiences of the other regiments in Walker’s Division were any indication, the 13th lost at least three killed, ten wounded, and two missing.2

Of those killed, it was known that Pvt. James B. Carleton of Company

H and Lieutenant Runnels, whose company was not reported, died in battle at Mansfield on April 8.3 Initial reports listed as many as forty-six men missing, since most of the wounded were evacuated away from the regiment to field hospitals in Mansfield.4 Few soldiers of the 13th

Texas would have had more than a fitful nap on their weapons that night, knowing they were guarding the Shreveport road from thirsty

Yankees soldiers just a few yards away from the position on Chapman’s

Bayou. First light at Pleasant Grove revealed a more hopeful reality.

Union troops had not altogether lost their enthusiasm for flight the previous evening, and had silently slipped away from their defensive positions in the darkness, after capturing a few Confederates who made it clear that they intended to continue the battle. There was little time for

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Chapter 6 Texans in the Bayou Country

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Chapter 6

Texans in the Bayou Country

★★★

“I do long to be at home. My very soul is sick of all this noise and turmoil.”

—Capt. John T. Stark, Company H, 13th Texas Cavalry1

A week after the 13th Texas arrived at Delhi, the rest of the division joined the East Texans. They soon learned that General McCulloch’s brigade had enjoyed momentary success in battle at Milliken’s Bend, nearly destroying a major Federal supply storage depot. Finally, though, they had been repulsed by a Union counterattack. Their own brigade had fared no better in its Young’s Point mission than had the 13th Texas at Lake Providence. With Burnett’s regiment detached, General Hawes was at a numerical disadvantage from the beginning. The twenty-eighthour operation began with a long night march and continued with difficulties finding the bridges on the route and intense heat. The soldiers, weakened by disease and bad water, were in no condition to attack when they reached their objective. Cpl. Bluford A. Cameron of Company B, 18th Texas Infantry, described the battle. “We marched on the

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