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Chapter IX Reward for Boone, Dead or Alive—His Escape

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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reward for boone, dead or alive— his escape

A large reward was offered for the capture of Boone Marlow, dead or alive, and in consequence the country swarmed with men eager to obtain this reward, either by fair means or foul.1 Boone soon learned of this, and fearing detection, he retraced his steps back to the home place and hid for the time being in a large stack of wheat straw, half a mile from the house. He tunneled into this big hill of straw for quite a ways, and excavated a room in its interior large enough for all practical purposes. No one ever dreamed he was in the neighborhood, though a crowd of men and officers seeking his life because of the high reward were continually about the premises, thinking no doubt that perhaps he might seek to communicate by some means with his family, and thereby leave some clue by which he might be traced and hunted down.

Food was conveyed to Boone by Charley’s wife, who displayed more courage and nerve than is usually shown by womankind, and showed herself to be a true heroine. This brave and true-hearted little woman made the trip from the house to the stack under cover of the darkness

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Chapter XIV The Home Besieged—One Hundred to One

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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the home besieged— one hundred to one

Brief time was there for the wounded brothers and grief stricken women to lament over the death of their loved ones, for their frail cabin had to be turned into a fortress, and hasty preparations made to defend their home and lives from the blood-thirsty horde which would be sure to arrive before long.

The brave mother was first to recover her self-possession, and commenced without delay for the siege. Charley was faint and helpless, the night’s ride having exhausted the little strength his wounds had left him. The only way in which he could breathe was when propped up in a sitting posture, and in this position, with a Winchester across his lap, he sat the following two days and nights. If anyone spoke loud or passed before him, he would instantly grasp his gun deliriously, try to draw it, then finding his mistake, sink back more exhausted than ever. The mother took command, Charley’s Alfred’s and George’s wives doing as she directed. When they had done all they could to put their little cabin in a state of defense, they busied themselves preparing cooling drink for the boys, and quietly awaited the coming of their enemies. Clift was in agony from a ragged wound in the thigh, and leaning on two guns, he continually hobbled up and down the floor, in too much pain to be quiet.

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Chapter XIII The Story in a New York Paper, in June 1891

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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the story in a new york paper, in June 1891

We make a chapter here from a detailed statement of the facts now being narrated, which appeared and was elaborately illustrated in the

National Police Gazette during the summer of 1891.1

HUNTED IN THE LAW’S NAME.

FOUR MEN IN SHACKLES AGAINST A HUNDRED.

BORDER LIFE IN TEXAS.

THE FAMOUS MARLOW MOB CASE.

There is no more startling story in all the turbulent annals of the southwest than the one that will be told when the “Marlow mob” cases are called up at the next term of the United States Supreme Court. ExAttorney-General Garland will appear for the defendants in the case, which comes up before the final legal tribunal on a writ of error.

The official records of the case, which are on file in the Supreme

Court, will, it is asserted, disclose an astounding conspiracy, which, started by designing men, finally led a whole community into a series of criminal transactions, and stained the history of [a] Texas county with blood. The story, now told for the first time, would certainly be incredible if it were not supported at all points by official records.

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Chapter VI A Dark and Diabolic Plot

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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a dark and diabolical plot

While still out on the hunt mentioned in the preceding chapter, and three or four days after the terrible experience with the wolves, the memorable blizzard that swept that section of the country with its wintry blasts in ’87 came upon them and caught them far from home and entirely shelterless. Many settlers and hundreds of head of stock froze to death in that terrible storm, and every living creature suffered from the chilling blasts of its icy breath.1 Our little hunting party tied all the blankets they had in camp over the shivering forms of their horses and then turned them loose, while for themselves they dug a deep pit and stretched a wagon cover over it. During the night they worked incessantly to keep a roaring fire in one end of their hole in the ground, and this they were enabled to do because of having over two hundred pounds of buffalo tallow to feed its flames. It was a dark and terrible night, and one which will remain in the history [memory?] of its survivors as long as they live. When those mighty blizzards of snow are blown over the great tracts of level and unprotected prairie lands in howling hurricanes that

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Chapter X Escape From Prison—Recaptured

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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escape from prison— recaptured

When the four brothers were taken to jail in Graham they were stripped naked and their clothes searched for arms or weapons of any description. Then they were shoved roughly into a small steel cage and locked and barred in with extra precaution. The turnkey and other jail officials and peace officers seemed determined to make their existence as miserable as possible, and every possible indignity and insult that could be devised was heaped relentlessly upon them. Their friends and even their mother and wives were denied admittance to them, and not a message or article of any kind was allowed to be transmitted either to or from them. The food they were given was of the coarsest kind, and not enough of it to have satisfied the hunger of one man, much less that of four strong and stalwart men like the Marlows at this time.

As day after day passed under this treatment, the realization that they were to be starved to death like rats in a cage forced its way upon their minds with all its horrors, and smarting under a hundred other insults, taunts and indignities, it is no wonder their free Western spirits rebelled, and that they resolved to make a bold break for liberty.

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