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Chapter XVIII Retrospective—The Marlows’ Lives, Their Happiness and Grief, Past and Present

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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retrospective— the marlows’ lives, their happiness and griefs, past and present

In reviewing these pages one can not help but consider how true the saying, “truth is stranger than fiction.” It seems incredible that men could pass through such hardships, rough usage, danger, and perils untold, and yet survive to tell the tale; and it seems doubly incredible that such atrocious and heinous crimes and outrages against law, society, and human life could be perpetrated in one of the largest states of the Union, in this enlightened day and date of civilization.

The Marlow family was a race of peace-loving and contented people. The wild, free, western life they led was full of happiness for them, peace and contentment, and free from harm of any kind to their fellow men. They hunted the deer in the forest, and trapped the beaver and mink in the streams. They fished in the sparkling lakes and rivers for the speckled beauties of the deep, and roamed over the boundless prairies after the buffalo and elk. They were sons of the great wild west, born beneath its azure skies, reared in its vigorous and healthful influence and bronzed by its sun and winds. They drank into their lungs the fresh breezes which blew over the prairies and stirred the tall blue joint grasses, and bravely battled with the fierce storms which came from the mountain regions. The snows of winter which piled up in great drifts in the sloughs and draws, and the icy blasts which roared

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Chapter I Pioneer Days—An Indian Scare

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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Pioneer Days—

An Indian Scare

In Nashville, Tennessee, in 1822, there lived in happiness and comparative prosperity, a very youthful married couple, the husband being scarce eighteen years of age. This was the handsome and ever good-natured Williamson Marlow Sr. and his child wife.1

After the birth of their first child2 they moved to Missouri, and a few years later, when three little pledges of love had gathered about the family fireside, the grim King of Terrors came in the still hours of the night and robbed that peaceful little home of its dearest treasure—a mother’s love and watchful care. A tiny spark of humanity was placed in the young widower’s arms, making four little ones3 for the griefstricken Williamson to be both father and mother to, and on that memorable day life lost for him its charm. Grief for the loss of a dutiful wife and loving mother knocked at his heart with a knell and he became for a time a wanderer, a brother and sister caring for the children. But time heals all wounds, so after the keen edge of his sorrow had worn

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Chapter VIII War Clouds—Boone Gathers Another Victim

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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war clouds— boone gathers another victim

Upon arriving at Graham, George’s first efforts were endeavors to provide bail for his imprisoned brothers, but in this he was temporarily balked, and instead was himself thrown into jail with them,1 by Johnson and Criswell who, having started in, were as relentless as death in their prosecution. In the few days prior to his arrest George had secured the services of an attorney, one Robert Arnold,2 who subsequently turned

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According to the Graham Leader of October 11, 1888, Deputy Marshal Johnson arrived in town on October 7 with four prisoners he had brought back from the Indian Territory. Besides

Pete Berry, “an old violator of the law . . . for whom Mr. Johnson has been on the look out for a long time,” T. A. Atterson, wanted for cattle stealing in Wilbarger County, and Bill Murphy, charged with horse stealing in the territory, Johnson had under arrest “George Marlow, brother of the four Marlows already in custody, who is also charged with horse stealing.” The paper noted that Murphy was a nephew of the Marlow brothers and had agreed to testify as a government witness against them. A warrant for George was issued on October 7 by Commissioner Girand and signed by Deputy Marshal Johnson as having been executed that day (Case #234, The United

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Chapter IX Reward for Boone, Dead or Alive—His Escape

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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reward for boone, dead or alive— his escape

A large reward was offered for the capture of Boone Marlow, dead or alive, and in consequence the country swarmed with men eager to obtain this reward, either by fair means or foul.1 Boone soon learned of this, and fearing detection, he retraced his steps back to the home place and hid for the time being in a large stack of wheat straw, half a mile from the house. He tunneled into this big hill of straw for quite a ways, and excavated a room in its interior large enough for all practical purposes. No one ever dreamed he was in the neighborhood, though a crowd of men and officers seeking his life because of the high reward were continually about the premises, thinking no doubt that perhaps he might seek to communicate by some means with his family, and thereby leave some clue by which he might be traced and hunted down.

Food was conveyed to Boone by Charley’s wife, who displayed more courage and nerve than is usually shown by womankind, and showed herself to be a true heroine. This brave and true-hearted little woman made the trip from the house to the stack under cover of the darkness

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Chapter III Scenes and Adventures in Mexico

Revised by William Rathmell. Edited with an Introduction and Annotations by Robert K. DeArment University of North Texas Press PDF

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scenes and adventures in mexico

In the spring of ’77, rumors of the wonders of South America having reached them, Dr. Marlow and the boys, together with about thirty others, mostly relatives, sold off their stock, bought mules, wagons and other necessities for a long journey, and began a trip overland to the balmy clime and flowery land of the tropics. It was a lovely morning in March when they started on their long journey, the soft south breeze made the tall grasses growing on the prairie nod a farewell to them, and the meadow larks sang a glad carol that the beauties and benefits of the old Lone

Star State might live in their memories, as well as the trials and dangers.

The company generally made it convenient to camp at or near some small town, where such a long train of covered wagons and the fine animals ridden by the boys invariably attracted much attention.

One evening while camped at a small town near Fort Worth, an unusually large crowd of visitors came out to see them and among these was a veritable dude and tenderfoot who was out from the New England

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