60 Chapters
Medium 9781574414707

Chapter 23

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 23

Reward and Jurisdiction Squabbles

O

n the train that carried Curry to Knoxville, W. B. Carey and Walter

Padgett, with their attorney Frank Parks (or Park), struck up a deal with Lieutenant McIntyre concerning the reward. They agreed that the men of the Jefferson City posse would split the reward with

McIntyre and the other three policemen. When the train reached the city, the agreement that had been drawn up by Parks was signed by

Carey and McIntyre, with police Chief Atkins as witness. However, the next day, Monday, December 16, the other members of the Jefferson

City posse hired legal representation in the firm of Pickle and Turner.

Frank Rhoton and John Clevenger publicly stated that Carey had made the agreement without consulting them, and that they did not agree with the division of the reward. The terms specifically stated that the four officers would divide half of the reward, leaving the other half to divide among the seven posse members. The Jefferson City men argued that the officers had nothing to do with the actual capture of Curry, and therefore did not deserve to receive such a large portion of the reward.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414707

Chapter 2

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 2

Cowboys in Montana

W

hether they came up the trails from Kansas City, Missouri, a starting point for the Westward Movement, or by trailing a herd from

Texas, to New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming, the brothers were in north-central Montana Territory by early fall of 1884.1 It is really just conjecture as to the route they took, since there are only a few cryptic references in the available literature. The latter route can be inferred in part from a statement by Pinkerton Detective Charles A. Siringo. Kid

Curry, “at an early age drifted to Texas and Colorado to become a cowboy. In 1884 he got into a ‘jackpot’ in Pueblo, Colorado, and had to hit the high places to escape the officers of the law, several bullets striking the buggy in which he made his getaway.”2 This is in reference to Harvey supposedly being involved in a brawl or shooting at a roadhouse outside of Pueblo.

Another brief mention is from A. V. “Kid Amby” Cheney who said he worked with Kid Curry as a “rep” with the Circle C outfit late in the season in 1890. “The … Curry brothers … were southern cowboys who had come north and settled on a ranch near Landusky in the Little Rockies.”3

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414769

Chapter 4: Pay Back

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER 4

Pay Back

There was a light snowfall the morning of December 27, 1894, and the cold was keeping several men inside the Clothing Store and Saloon run by Jake Harris. Harris’ left leg had been amputated close to the hip after a gun battle with City Marshal George Treat of Great Falls in November 1891.1 He used a shotgun for a crutch if he expected any trouble in his saloon. Harris and Landusky were friends, and Landusky had put up the money for the building with the status of silent partner. There was a counter in the back of the saloon where cheap clothing and some food items were sold. Harris had sent to Anaconda for a friend of his named Charles Annis, who went by the name Hogan, to be his clerk. Despite being frail and tubercular, he was reputed to be a gunman. It was understood that, besides minding the store, another duty of Hogan’s was to keep the wild cowboy element, such as the Currys, in line.2

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414707

Chapter 14

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 14

The Law Closes In

A

reward poster issued by the Union Pacific Railroad and Pacific Express companies, dated January 12, 1900, and a Pinkerton National

Detective Agency poster dated February 23, 1900, stated there was

“satisfactory evidence” and it had been “definitely ascertained” that three of the robbers were Kid Curry, his brother Lonie, and their cousin

Bob Lee, with the $18,000 reward still in effect. By this time the Pinkertons were publicly vacillating on the issue of whether there were more than three involved. Their poster stated there may have been five or six men in the robbery.1

“In the files of the Union Pacific Railroad,” one writer states, “Harvey Logan was listed as the leader of the gang at Wilcox. What proof the UP officials had of this fact isn’t known, though it may have been because they considered him the most callous and dangerous of the Wild

Bunch.”2 Kid Curry’s leadership role should more likely be attributed to his possessing the intelligence to plan and carry out a successful train robbery.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414769

Chapter 14: The Law Closes In

Mark T. Smokov University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER 14

The Law Closes In

A reward poster issued by the Union Pacific Railroad and Pacific Express companies, dated January 12, 1900, and a Pinkerton National Detective Agency poster dated February 23, 1900, stated there was “satisfactory evidence” and it had been “definitely ascertained” that three of the robbers were Kid Curry, his brother Lonie, and their cousin Bob Lee, with the $18,000 reward still in effect. By this time the Pinkertons were publicly vacillating on the issue of whether there were more than three involved. Their poster stated there may have been five or six men in the robbery.1

“In the files of the Union Pacific Railroad,” one writer states, “Harvey Logan was listed as the leader of the gang at Wilcox. What proof the UP officials had of this fact isn’t known, though it may have been because they considered him the most callous and dangerous of the Wild Bunch.”2 Kid Curry’s leadership role should more likely be attributed to his possessing the intelligence to plan and carry out a successful train robbery.

See All Chapters

See All Chapters