15 Slices
Medium 9781574413069

Chapter 4: Vacchiano’s Rules of Orchestral Performance

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

VACCHIANO’S RULES OF ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE

“I have a question that’s always asked: ‘When the value of a note gets shorter (quarter, eighth, sixteenth, etc.), how is the length of each note treated?’ I ask them in return, ‘If you’re going ten miles an hour and the note is one inch long, how long is the note if you are going twenty miles per hour?’ They will all say a half-inch. This is wrong. If you’re going twenty miles per hour it’s twice as long. The faster you go the longer the notes will be, otherwise it will disappear. Consequently, when you double and triple tongue the double tongue has to be twice as long as the single tongue. The triple tongue is twice as long as the double tongue to counteract for the speed in the air.

“We always spread eighth-notes very short because the air could catch them very fast, but if you’re playing at a terrific speed and you continue to play the eighth-notes short, they’ll go by like a shot—you have to counteract it. In the old days we called this hammer tongue.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574413069

Appendix D: New York Philharmonic U.S. Premières, 1935–1973

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix D

New York Philharmonic U.S. Premières, 1935–1973

* Symphony Society of New York

** Stadium Concert

+ NYP Commission

Composer

Composition

Date

Delius, Frederick

Delius, Frederick

Verdi, Giuseppe

Bax, Sir Arnold

Purcell-Barbirolli

Vaughan Williams, Ralph

“Koanga,” Dance

“Koanga,” Finale

String Quartet in E Minor

The Tale the PineTrees Knew

Suite for Strings

“Job,” A Masque for Dancing

1/2/1936

1/12/1936

1/23/1936

11/5/1936

11/7/1936

11/26/1936

Barbirolli, John

Jora, Mihail

Otesco, Nonna

Bartok, Béla

Oboe Concerto on Themes of Pergolesi

Marche Juive

“De La Matei Citire,” Prelude to Act II

Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta

1/6/1937

1/28/1937

1/30/1937

10/28/1937

Rossellini, Renzo**

Canto di Palude

7/18/1938

Castelnuovo-Tedesco,

Mario**

Rossellini, Renzo**

Gomez, Carlos**

Aguirre, Julián **

Overture to “The Merchant of Venice”

6/18 /1939

Prelude to “Aminta”

Suite Andaluza

“Huella y Gato” from Two Argentine Dances

6/24/1939

7/15/1939

7/19/1939

Johnson, Horace**

Zemlinsky, Alexander

The Streets of Florence

Sinfonietta for Orchestra, op. 23

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574413069

Appendix B: New York Philharmonic Trumpet Section, The Vacchiano Years, 1935–1973

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix B

New York Philharmonic Trumpet Section,

The Vacchiano Years, 1935–1973

Season

1935–1936

Principal

Harry Glantz

Second

Third/Assistant

Nathan Prager William Vacchiano

Fourth

Max Schlossberg

1936–1937

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

Vacant

William Vacchiano

1937–1938

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

William Vacchiano

Vacant

1938–1939

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

William Vacchiano

Vacant

1939–1940

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

William Vacchiano

Vacant

1940–1941

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

William Vacchiano

Vacant

1941–1942

Harry Glantz

Nathan Prager

William Vacchiano

Vacant

1942–1943

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

James Smith

Vacant

1943–1944

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

James Smith

Vacant

1944–1945

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

Morris Boltuch

James Smith

1945–1946

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

Morris Boltuch

James Smith

1946–1947

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

Morris Boltuch

James Smith

1947–1948

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

Morris Boltuch

James Smith

1948–1949

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

John Ware

James Smith

1949–1950

William Vacchiano

Nathan Prager

John Ware

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574413069

Chapter 5: Pedagogical Methods

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter FIVE

P edagogical Methods

F

Vacchiano’s teaching career spanned seven decades as an instructor at The Juilliard School (1935–2002), Manhattan School of Music

(1937–1999), Mannes College of Music (1937–1983), Queens College

(1970–1973, 1991–1994), North Carolina School of the Arts (1973–

1976), and Columbia Teachers College.1 In addition to his tenure at these renowned music schools, he instructed many students at his home in Flushing, New York, from 1935 to 2005. Vacchiano estimated he privately taught over 2,000 students during his entire career.2

Vacchiano’s professional teaching and playing careers began simultaneously when he joined the New York Philharmonic as third trumpet

(and assistant principal) at the age of twenty-three. Due to the declining health of his former teacher, Max Schlossberg, Vacchiano was appointed to the faculty of The Juilliard School.

Teaching Style

The teaching style Vacchiano employed during his career was strikingly similar to the style learned during his studies with Max Schlossberg, focusing primarily on orchestral style, transposition, and the rudiments of playing the trumpet. Weekly lessons were comprised of studies from three main method books: Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet, Saint-Jacome’s Grand Method for Trumpet or Cornet, and

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574413069

Chapter 1: Biography

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter one

B iography

F

Family History

William Anthony Vacchiano was born on May 23, 1912, in Portland, Maine, the seventh of eight children to Rafaello and Anna Vacchiano. Of his seven siblings, Vacchiano had five older sisters, one older brother, and one younger brother. The two oldest sisters, Mary and Margarita, were born in Italy before their parents immigrated to the United

States from their hometown of Cicciano, Italy. Vacchiano’s father, Rafaello, was trained as a metal worker after serving as a member of the

King’s Guard.1 Eventually, Rafaello sailed for America where he hoped to find more financial stability and a better life for his family. Many immigrants had various family members already living in America, which made the move and transition easier. It was no different for Rafaello.

When he arrived at Ellis Island, he was greeted by his two brothers,

Megucia and Pasquale.2

Rafaello Vacchiano found a place to live on Atlantic Avenue in

Brooklyn and began working there as a grocer. A year later, after enough money had been saved, he was able to pay for his wife and two daughters to move to America. This trip was more difficult than the usual transAtlantic crossing, for the ship, the Ravelli, developed rudder problems and was forced to dock in order to make the appropriate repairs. It took almost a month for parts to arrive and repairs to be made. Passengers

See All Chapters

See All Slices