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Appendix 13 • Letter from Bourke regarding Lieutenant Jacob Almy's Death

Edited and Annotated by Charles M. Robinson III University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix 13

Letter from Bourke regarding

Lieutenant Jacob Almy's Death

Undated Clipping from the Arizona Miner

Volume 1, Page 187

[Handwritten comment by Bourke] Murdered May 27th 1873

[Clipping from newspaper]

“Readers of the MINER will be pained to learn of the murder, at the San Carlos Indian agency, on the 27th ultimo, of lst Lieut. Jacob

Almy, 5th Cavalry, a young officer of prominence during the recent campaign.

From the meagre details thus far furnished, I can only state that

Lieut. Almy’s death occurred while endeavoring to quell a disturbance among the Indians of the San Carlos Reservation. These disturbances, growing out of rivalry and antagonism between the former and the present agent, to which the Indians became involved. The particulars of this hostility have been known to the Indian Department in this Territory for some time.

Lieut. Almy was, I believe, a native of Massachusetts and a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, in the class of 1867.

His first services were seen in the campaign of 1867-68, against the hostile Cheyennes and Arapahoes, in which he displayed the same high qualities which afterwards made him so conspicuous in General Crook’s operations against the Apaches. He was present for duty during that campaign, from its first inception to its close, and such were his gallantry, coolness, sound judgment and enthusiastic

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19. Navajo Country

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Chapter 19

Navajo Country

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rom Fort Wingate, Bourke and Hatch journeyed to the Navajo Agency at Fort Defiance, Arizona,1 the headquarters of a 5,500-square-mile reservation set aside for the Navajos by treaty in 1868. The treaty concluded a long series of conflicts, to which Bourke alludes in this chapter. Trouble broke out shortly after the American occupation of the region in 1846. Clashes were almost continual until 1863, when Col. Christopher Carson led a contingent of troops and Ute scouts through the heart of Navajo country, destroying crops and livestock, and undermining Navajo subsistence. The Navajos were forced to surrender, and in 1864, some 8,000 were forced on the so-called “long walk” from Fort

Defiance to Fort Sumner, New Mexico, where they were interned until the 1868 treaty was formalized.2

April 24th 1881. Sunday. After Guard Mounting and Inspection, during which latter General Hatch closely examined the gun of every soldier and afterwards the arrangement and police of the quarters;

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Appendix 5 • Posts in the Department of Arizona

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8: A Summons to Washington

Edited and Annotated by Charles M. Robinson III University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter 8

A Summons to Washington

S

unday, December 12th 1880.

In obedience to the telegraphic instructions from Washington, as follows:

Washington, D.C., 12-10-80.

The President desiring to see you in regard to the Ponca Indians, the Secy. of War directs you to report to this city when convenient for you to do so.

(Sign.) R. C. Drum

Adjutant General.

General Crook, accompanied by his Aides, Captain Roberts and

Lieut. Bourke, left Omaha, Neb., for Washington, D.C. At Council

Bluffs, Iowa, we met Mr. S. S. Stevens, General Passenger Agent of the Chicago, Rock-Island and Pacific Rail Road, and Mr. Morris of the Wabash Line and Mr. Ezra Willard.

On our train, were Dr. George L. Miller, Editor of the Omaha Herald, ex-Senator P. W. Hitchcock, Mr. N. Shelton, Cashier of the U.P.R.R.,

Mr. Frank Murphy of the State Bank—all of Omaha and all en route to New York to consult with the Union Pacific officials about the erection of grain elevators at Omaha. We also met Mr. Dows, a very bright, companionable old gentleman from the Pacific Coast; and

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5: A Trip East

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Chapter 5

A Trip East

S

ept. 5th 1880. Left Omaha, viâ “Burlington” road1 for Chicago and the East. At dépôt, met my friend, Mr. William Carter, son of Judge Carter of Fort Bridger, Wyo., and also met exSenator [John Milton] Thayer of Nebraska. In Chicago dined at the

Palmer House and then took the Balt[imore]. and Ohio Express for

Washington.

Sept. 6th 1880. Major [Azor H.] Nickerson met me in the R.R. dépôt, upon my arrival. (9.20 P.M.) and took me to his neat little home on Rhode-Island Avenue (near 18th [Street]). During my stay at the

Capital, Nickerson exerted himself in every way possible to make my visit pleasurable. I did not visit many public buildings, my time being too brief, but I saw many delightful people, some of whom I had previously known personally and others through communications. Nickerson’s office was in the War Department, (in the old Navy building.) There I met numbers of officers—Generals [Samuel?]

Breck, [Emory] Upton, [William B.] Hazen, [Richard Coulter] Drum,

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