156 Chapters
Medium 9781574412239

21. The Lore of Retirement and Extended Care Facilities

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

21

THE LORE OF RETIREMENT

AND EXTENDED CARE FACILITIES by Kenneth W. Davis

Bumper sticker seen often on expensive SUVs and RVs:

WE ARE SPENDING OUR KIDS’ INHERITANCE!

Bumper sticker seen often on moderately priced family sedans:

REMEMBER! YOUR KIDS WILL PICK YOUR NURSING

HOME!

The evolution of terms used to describe what one informant called

“warehouses for the old and infirm” introduces locations in which a significant body of lore is growing actively. Many Texans remember

“poorhouse,” “county farm,” and “old folks’ home” as descriptors of residences for some elderly people. Now, thanks to mysterious processes of linguistic change brought about probably by different views of social welfare, there are fancy-Dan terms: Senior Retirement

Center, Sunshine City, Retirement Village, or Golden Year Refuge.

And to label facilities that are restricted to nursing care, there are other examples of linguistic subterfuge: “extended care facility,”

“assisted living center,” and “skilled nursing facility.” The terms are concocted by dedicated and determined marketing specialists to make the “warehouses for the old” seem like paradises on earth.

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Medium 9781574415322

Robert J. (Jack) Duncan - “Red Overton, Somervell County Cedar-Chopper"

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

RED OVERTON, SOMERVELL COUNTY

CEDAR-CHOPPER by Robert J. (Jack) Duncan

If they made a film about Red Overton, I don’t know who they could get to play him—now that John Wayne and Robert

Mitchum are permanently unavailable. Maybe there’s a stuntman out there who could pull it off, but I really doubt it.

Red Overton was a larger-than-life backwoodsman who lived in Somervell County, Texas. He was a big, raw-boned man with big hands. Some called him “Bear Track” Overton because of the size of his feet. Red stood six-foot-two. And he was as tough and gnarled as the cedar (actually juniper) growing on those rocky

Somervell County hills.

Red was a quiet man. He didn’t have much formal education, but he was wise in the ways of the woods. In the 1920s and 1930s,

Overton was a post cutter: he cut cedar posts for barbed wire fencing and sold them for a few cents apiece at a nearby crossroads store. Sometimes he traded them for cans of Prince Albert pipe tobacco, from which he rolled his own cigarettes.

Red Overton’s full name was Ebra John Hardy Overton. He was born on January 12, 1893, in Randolph, Alabama. He moved to Texas as a very young child with his family. He died on

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Medium 9781574412024

Part 5b. Language and Study

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574413205

The Lore of Wild Hog Hunting in Texas

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch02.pdf

10/6/11

8:15 AM

Page 139

THE LORE OF WILD HOG

HUNTING IN WEST TEXAS by Kenneth W. Davis

In many parts of West Texas on Friday and Saturday nights when there are neither football nor basketball games, chronological or psychological adolescents and others—male and female, from ages about fourteen through sixty or way beyond—delight in roaring around farm and ranch lands after dusk in high-powered all-wheel drive vehicles—mostly pickups equipped with strong spot lights.

These vigorous people are armed with 30.06s and similar weapons.

In a single four-wheel-drive pickup there is usually enough ammunition to quell a moderate-sized insurrection or flying saucer invasion. The presence of intrepid hunters is welcomed by owners of the land over which these Nimrods ramble frantically in search of what is considered a dangerous creature found almost everywhere in Texas: the wild hog. These hogs are a nuisance, a pestilence, threats to man and beast, and, of course, they smell bad, have ticks, and are ugly. In most species the very young are at least somewhat cute. Not so with wild hogs I have seen up close in West Texas.

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Medium 9781574412239

16. The Long Arm of the Law

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

16

THE LONG ARM OF THE LAW by Martha Emmons

Since the first law, in the Garden of Eden, man has chosen to pit himself and his judgment against any regulation of his conduct.

From the first, homo sapiens has been trying to circumvent, shortcircuit, or else stretch out the law to suit his own purpose. Overlooking all thought of the original purpose of law, either of God or of man, which has always been for the well-being of those governed, man is still playing the old game: man versus the law. Sometimes he does it by far-fetched interpretations, sometimes by unwarranted assumption, sometimes by simply gambling that he will not get caught this time.

No doubt it was true of the cave man. Certainly it was of the ancient Hebrews. Even believing as they did believe in the divine origin of their law, they still played the game. Amos thundered at their oblique methods of undermining the law. “You make the ephah small,” he declared, “and the shekel large,” and in other ways subverted justice, to the disadvantage of those most needing the law’s protection.

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