18 Chapters
Medium 9781574412826

Scientific Bird Names

Ricardo Rozzi and collaborators University of North Texas Press PDF

SCIENTIFIC BIRD NAMES

Accipiter bicolor

Anairetes parulus

Aphrastura spinicauda

Bubo magellanicus

Buteo polyosoma

Campephilus magellanicus

Caracara plancus

Carduelis barbata

Cathartes aura

Ceryle torquata

Cinclodes fuscus

Cinclodes patagonicus

Colaptes pitius

Colorhamphus parvirostris

Coragyps atratus

Curaeus curaeus

Diuca diuca

Elaenia albiceps

Enicognathus ferrugineus

Falco sparverius

Gallinago paraguaiae

Geranoaetus melanoleucus

Glaucidium nanum

Milvago chimango

Parabuteo unicinctus

90

157

67

82

196

49

187

141

206

95

105

107

131

153

209

165

174

137

71

191

99

193

87

184

199

Pardirallus sanguinolentus

Patagioenas araucana

Patagona gigas

Phrygilus patagonicus

Phytotoma rara

Picoides lignarius

Pteroptochos tarnii

Pygarrhichas albogularis

Pygochelidon cyanoleuca

Scelorchilus rubecula

Scytalopus magellanicus

Sephanoides sephaniodes

Strix rufipes

Sturnella loyca

Sylviorthorhyncus desmursii

Tachycineta meyeni

Theristicus melanopis

Troglodytes aedon

Turdus falcklandii

Tyto alba

Vanellus chilensis

Vultur gryphus

Xolmis pyrope

Zenaida auriculata

Zonotrichia capensis

102

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Medium 9781574412826

CD – II

Ricardo Rozzi and collaborators University of North Texas Press PDF

The Millennium Science Initiative Program (MSI) is an original model in the developing world whose main objective is to promote the advancement of cutting edge scientific and technological research in

Chile. This is done through Centers of Excellence in scientific research in the fields of Natural and Exact Sciences and in Social Sciences, as a relevant actor in the National System of Science, Technology and

Innovation. www.iniciativamilenio.cl

This book is a revised and amplified edition of the “Multi-ethnic bird guide of the austral temperate forests of South America,” published by Fantástico Sur – Birding & Nature, in 2003.

Cover: Branches of High Deciduous Beech (Nothofagus pumilio) with photographs of Úrsula Calderón and Magellanic

Woodpecker (top left), Cristina Calderón and Ringed Kingfisher (top right), Lorenzo Aillapan and Red-Backed Hawk, and

Ricardo Rozzi and Austral Pygmy Owl. Design by Paola Vezzani & Ricardo Rozzi. Photographs by John Schwenk (Úrsula

Calderón and Ricardo Rozzi), Paola Vezzani (branches of High Deciduous Beech or “Lenga” tree, and coastal landscape at the Beagle Channel, Navarino Island), Oliver Vogel (Cristina Calderón and Lorenzo Aillapan), Steve Morello (Austral Pygmy

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Acknowledgments

Ricardo Rozzi and collaborators University of North Texas Press PDF

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Acknowledgments for the first edition of this book in 2003:

As it was said in the Introduction, this guide is a collective work that is possible thanks to the fact that birds, forested ecosystems and very diverse people exist. In particular, the authors sincerely thank the following individuals and organizations:

Mario Chiguay, President of the Indigenous Yahgan Community of Bahía Mejillones, and all the other members of the community who collaborated in this project, especially Julia González;

Manuel Muñoz, Advisor to the Chiloé Council of Chiefs, the members of the Huilliche communities in Chanquin and Huentemó, the school teachers of Chanquin and Mr. Francisco Delgado, Chiloé

National Park, who encourage and helped the initiation of this project;

The poet Lorenzo Aillapan, who teaches in the Pullümapukimunweftuy Mapuche Academy in Puerto

Saavedra, a cultural center which this guide hopes to serve;

Dr. Víctor Fajardo, President of the University of Magallanes, Luis Oval, Vice-President for Academic

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Medium 9781574412826

CD – I

Ricardo Rozzi and collaborators University of North Texas Press PDF

Name

Time

1

Trutruka song (Lorenzo Aillapan)

1:06:51

FOREST

INTERIOR

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Magellanic Woodpecker

Magellanic Tapaculo

Black-Throated Huet-Huet

Chucao Tapaculo

White-Throated Treerunner

Thorn-Tailed Rayadito

Austral Parakeet

Desmur´s Wiretail

0:40:57

0:22:36

0:32:65

0:31:14

0:24:40

0:25:40

0:28:57

0:50:67

OWLS

10

11

12

13

14

Rufous-Legged Owl

Austral Great Horned Owl

Barn Owl

Austral Pygmy Owl

Bicolored Hawk

0:43:14

0:31:21

0:27:52

0:28:16

0:17:52

WETLANDS

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Ringed Kingfisher

Common Snipe

Plumbeous Rail

Bar-Winged Cinclodes

Dark-Bellied Cinclodes

Chilean Swallow

Blue-and-White Swallow

Buff-Necked Ibis

Southern Lapwing

0:31:60

0:39:17

0:29:27

0:25:18

0:24:02

0:31:26

0:25:24

0:33:21

0:23:18

FOREST MARGINS

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

Chilean Pigeon

Eared Dove

Chilean Flicker

Striped Woodpecker

White-Crested Elaenia

Black-Chinned Siskin

Patagonian Sierrafinch

Austral Thrush

House Wren

Patagonian Tyrant

Tufted Tit-Tyrant

Rufous-Collared Sparrow

Fire-Eyed Diucon

Austral Blackbird

Green-Backed Firecrown

Giant Hummingbird

Common Diuca Finch long-Lailed Meadowlark

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Medium 9781574412826

III. Wetland Birds, Associated with Riparian, Coastal or Prairie Habitats

Ricardo Rozzi and collaborators University of North Texas Press PDF

WETLAND BIRDS

Chéketej

Challwafe üñüm

Martín pescador

Ringed Kingfisher

CD 1 / Track 15

Ceryle torquata, formerly classified as Megaceryle (great = Gk. megas; kingfisher= Gk. ceryle) torquata, is the largest South American kingfisher, and it is the only one that reaches subpolar latitudes. Its distribution spans from Texas and Arizona in southern United States to Cape Horn in southern South America, where it receives the Yahgan name of chéketej.

It is a conspicuously colored species with an elegant white collar and a blue crest, especially marked in the male. It possesses a long, strong beak that permits it to catch fish in rivers, lakes, channels and fjords of the extreme south. It is frequently observed perched on branches or rocks that overhang rivers or the shoreline. On these, the Ringed Kingfisher waits for the appearance of marine and freshwater fish, crustaceans and larvae that it hunts on the surface of the water or by plunging itself into it. When it notices danger, it sweeps back and forth in the air, emitting its strong, repetitive calls kekereke- kekereke- kekereke.

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