89 Slices
Medium 9781574412772

HOOKED ON TEXAS

Kenneth L. Untiedt, editor University of North Texas Press PDF

HOOKED ON TEXAS by Clarence Jay Faulkner

[The postcards used as illustrations for this article, as well as those used for “filler pages” and division pages between chapters throughout this book, were collected by Clarence Faulkner and, as he states in his article, donated to the Texas Folklore Society for its archives. We greatly appreciate this contribution, as the postcards display a unique perspective of collectible Texana over the last century.—Untiedt]

Being a proud native Texan born in 1949 not far from the confluence of the Brazos and Bosque Rivers, (and raised in east Waco), a survivor of the devastating tornado of May 11, 1953, and a lover of Dr. Pepper and Moon Pie, I remain hooked on Texas even though I am currently far away in the Pacific Northwest.

In recent years, the hook has taken a stronger bite as I’ve embarked on a serious study of all things Texas. I scan everything for tidbits on Texas and my memberships/subscriptions include the Texas Folklore Society, Sul Ross State’s Center for Big Bend

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Medium 9781574412567

IV. Superstitions, Strange Stories, and Voices from the “Other Side”

Kenneth L. Untiedt, editor University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574412772

AN ENDURING RELATIONSHIP: THE TEXAS FOLKLORE SOCIETY AND FOLK MUSIC

Kenneth L. Untiedt, editor University of North Texas Press PDF

AN ENDURING RELATIONSHIP: THE TEXAS

FOLKLORE SOCIETY AND FOLK MUSIC by L. Patrick Hughes

A commitment to the preservation, analysis, and enjoyment of folk music underlay the 1909 creation of the Texas Folklore Society. As it was in the beginning, so it remains. Over its century-long existence, the Society has been a nurturing home for collectors and interpreters such as John A. Lomax, William A. Owens, Américo

Paredes, and others. Its publications are replete with both scholarly and popular examinations of cowboy songs, train songs, field hollers, border corridos, the blues, and Old World ballads that made their way to Texas. Annual meetings have consistently featured presentations on various aspects of folk music by both academicians and lay aficionados. Groups as varied as the Southwest

Texas Sacred Harp Convention, the Jubilee Choir, Four Boys from the Brakes, and the East Texas String Ensemble have performed the songs of our collective past at TFS convocations all across the

Lone Star State. Nor would any annual meeting be complete without the hootenanny that has been a TFS tradition for the last halfcentury. It has been and remains a symbiotic relationship that through all the years has enriched both the Society and folk music.

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"Graveyard Meanderin’; Or, Things of Life Learned Among the Dead”

Kenneth L. Untiedt, editor University of North Texas Press PDF

GRAVEYARD MEANDERIN’; OR, THINGS OF

LIFE LEARNED AMONG THE DEAD by Leslie LaRo

I have never been a particularly “normal” person, considering my unique quirks and “idiot-synchrasies” (yes, I know that’s not a real word, but what is language if it won’t do what we need it to do?). I get what my mom used to call “big ideas” as in, “what’s the big idea, anyway?” Not all of them are fuzzy, warm, or particularly comfortable for others to consider, so some of them I keep to myself until I know a person better. One is my lifelong fascination with cemeteries, or graveyards. Most folks really don’t understand this interest in walking, talking (to myself and whoever else may be listening), snapping pictures, and writing in a graveyard. I only know it has offered me images, ideas, and inspiration countless times. Oh, you may call it ghoulish, but there it is.

Never considered whistlin’ past one, but I have also never driven past a country graveyard without wishing to go spend a few hours wandering around . . . just being. I am not talking about those manicured, devoid of standing stones, everything-at-groundlevel jobs. No sir. I speak of the places where breezes tickle overgrown brush—where grasshoppers and grass burrs await your step with anticipation. This is true no matter where I find myself: Anyplace, Texas, the South or Southwest, Washington state, Ireland, or Scotland. I really come alive in a graveyard.

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"A Most Unusual Upbringing”

Kenneth L. Untiedt, editor University of North Texas Press PDF

A MOST UNUSUAL UPBRINGING by A. C. Sanders

Most men stumble into their life’s role. A chance encounter sparks a flame, a career pursued; a birthright endows one a profession.

Some drift from trade to trade until something sticks. Others simply drift. My grandfather, Bab, labored as a ranch hand, then a butcher, until finding a life’s calling when he landed a job at a furniture store sometime around 1920. The owner operated a funeral parlor in the back of the store. Eventually, Bab became one of the first licensed morticians in the Lubbock area.

Until his mind became fogged with dementia, my father often recounted with nostalgia those days at the furniture store. As a boy, he was assigned the daily duty of dusting the furniture displays.

Often a call came in from a ranch or small community out on the

Staked Plains requesting the services of an undertaker. Bab loaded his equipment into a Model T Ford, Dad hopped into the passenger seat, and off they went across the prairie, there being few roads to their destinations. They traversed one property to another. At each fence line, Dad jumped out, opened the gate, then closed it after the old Ford passed through. Flats and breakdowns were commonplace, and ruts suddenly transformed to axle-deep loblolly should a thunderstorm strike. A forty-to-sixty-mile journey occupied most of a day.

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